Jelly That Makes Electronic Sounds

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NOISY JELLY from Raphaël Pluvinage on Vimeo.

Designer Raphaël Pluvinage has designed an innovative way for you to play two things you were taught not to: food and electricity.  His prototype “game” is appropriately named Noisy Jelly.  “Players” first mold jelly using various provided molds and colors.  The jelly is then placed on a board that is connected to a computer.  Touching the jelly produces a fun array of sounds.  Different tones are produced depending on the size and shape of the jelly, the salt content of each mold (determined by the color), as well as where and how the jelly is touched.  Check out the video to hear the noisy jelly.

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Creepy Ultra-Realistic Body Painting

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The people pictured here are not modified, mutilated, or even Photoshopped.  Rather they are only covered in acrylic paint.  The Artist Chooo-San carefully paints extremely realistic extra eyes and mouths, zippers, cords, and plugs on directly on to the bodies of her subjects.  Her work is so realistic, it’s nearly disturbing at times and surprising it isn’t digitally manipulated.  She says:

“But I guess I was a little sick of everyone making pictures with their computers and wanted to see how far I can go without those technologies such as Photoshop.  My works are all done with acrylic paints.  They are all painted on skin directly and I don’t use computers or anything to change the picture afterwards.”  [via]

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Abstract ‘Paintings’ Made From Coogi Sweaters

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The abstract ‘paintings’ by artist Jayson Musson (also known by his alter-ego Hennessy Youngman) are created from piecing together Coogi sweaters, a brand of sweater popular in the late 1980’s and early 90’s.  The sweaters carry especially specific associations – Clifford Huxtable of the TV sitcom the Cosby Show or the rapper Notorious B.I.G.  However, the sweaters are also known for a specific style that lends itself well to abstract art.  Musson elaborates:

“The thing I found most alluring about Coogi sweaters was how painterly they were. They seemingly lingered on the borders of gestural abstraction. I made the joke, “That Coogi looks like a Pollock”. Over the course of the following weeks, I began collecting images of the sweaters, studying their composition. They seemed to defy the traditional logic of the textile, opting instead to appear spontaneous and created by hand rather than machine-made. Each sweater, though a manufactured object seemed to seek its own authenticity.” [via]

Huge Black And White Street Art Murals Start As Small Pen Drawings

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Brazilian street artist Claudio Ethos creates huge black and white murals often cover entire buildings.  His unique highly detailed style resembles wildly enlarged drawings.  However, this isn’t entirely far from the reality of Ethos’ process.  His pieces often begin as  meticulous ball point pen drawings.  Ethos’ talent isn’t only in his creative imagery or drawing skills, but his ability to replicate these drawings on an enormous scale.  The resulting style is one that is large in size without being imposing, personal as if you were holding the page yourself.

Sculptures That Seem To Extend Infinitely

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Artist Ivan Navarro is known for his work with neon and fluorescent lighting.  Using the lights in with a one-way mirror and a regular mirror Navarro’s sculpture to extend endlessly.  They appear to extend on into infinite darkness, adding a weighty metaphorical layer to his artwork.  His work conveys a certain uneasiness with each pieces ambiguous text, which exacerbated by the visual abyss.  “There is a certain amount of fear in my pieces”, he has appropriately said.  “I make spaces in a fictional way to deal with my own psychological anxiety.”

Time Lapse Of Fog Flowing Into San Francisco Two Years In The Making

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Adrift from Simon Christen on Vimeo.

Photographer Simon Christen calls Adrift, his two year in the making video, “a love letter to the fog of the San Francisco Bay Area.”  The often daily fog is just one feature that makes the San Francisco peculiarly wonderful.  Christen worked through out the two year period to catch the images fog a few seconds at a time.  An ocean of fog appears to flow like water down hills, through and under the Golden Gate Bridge, and into the city.  Set to a custom score by Jimmy LaValle of The Album Leaf, Adrift underscores the beautiful mystery of unique area.

Photographs Of Super Heroes As Saints

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Perhaps the digital artwork of Antonio Strafella isn’t so profane as it may at first seem.  His series Spiritual Hero at once compares and juxtaposes saints and superheroes, the holy and the vulgar.  Comic books are often thought of as the exclusive domain of young people, rarely taken serious.  However, in a strange way the superheroes don’t seem exceptionally out of place in Strafella’s work.  Indeed, many of the grand story lines of the characters featured by Strafella have clear Biblical references.  He goes on to say:

“These icons have various aspects in common: saints do miracles and superheroes have superpowers, both are venerated, opening the conflict between faith and zealotry.”

Street Art Interventions To Disrupt Your Walk In The City

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To the street artist known as R1, the city is a living thing and he creates his ‘interventions’ accordingly.  The city and its streets are something we interact with each day.  R1’s simple interventions reveal our relationship with our urban homes.  Perhaps more importantly, though, it challenges us to interact with the city in an entirely new ways.  R1 says of his process:

“I consider the street as an open canvas. I work with urban interventions and collect every day found materials, transforming them and placing them back where they came from, to become a part of the city’s journey. The resulting artwork is tactile, moving within the motion of the cityscape.  Like the street, the work finds its meaning once an interaction with the passer-by takes place.”