Manmade Hermit Crab Shells Mimic Human Buildings

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Artist Aki Inomata asks “Why not hand over a “shelter” to hermit crabs?”  and this is exactly what she does.  Inomata carefully scanned the structure of shells used by hermit crabs and took note of their specific needs.  Then using 3D modeling software she created new “homes” for these crabs.  Drawing a connection between humans and the hermit crabs, Inomata decorated the shells with human structures and dwellings.  Somewhat similar to humans, the crabs out grow their shells and must look for new shelter.  The project underscores the basic need of a place to live, regardless of the seeming complexity behind the issue.

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Glitch Inspired Street Art

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The art of the glitch has made its way off the screen out of the realm of the accidental.  Perhaps it’s the aesthetic source of a new abstraction.  The form has also made its way street art and graffiti.  Polish artist Krzysztof Syruć incorporates explicit glitch stylings and subtler inspiration in much of his work.  This first piece seems to use its background as a source image.  The image is distorted, ‘corrupted’, and reduced to basic values.  Other pieces seem to reference circuitry, code, and even biological systems.

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Photographs Of Humorously Pointless Products

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Giuseppe Colarusso‘s photographs and their clever manipulations betray a certain sense of humor.  His simple images of everyday objects are modified in such a way that they are rendered useless.  He portrays flimsy handled silverware, cyclops sunglasses, bottle sans top.  A commodity with out a use has no value – a sort of capitalist existentialism.  On the other hand, perhaps its just funny.

10 Street Art Images You Need To See

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This week’s images bring us surprising works of beauty, detail, and wit.  Sam3 brings a silhouette mural with an innovate use of the fence posts (I’m guessing located in rural Spain) – the piece references the expulsion of the Moors from the Ricote valley in the 16th century.  We also have a giant new mural in Poland from Sainer of the ETAM crew. Alexis Diaz also give a new mural, an elephant/octopus creature a week in the making comprised of thousands of detailed brushstrokes.  Stenciler DS smartly rebuffs the buffer – after one of his stencils was painted over DS replaces it with a portrait of the “remover man”.  David de la Mano‘s is a poetic and carefully detailed mandala-esque piece.  Ludo expounds on his theme of contrasting technology and nature with an impressive tulip-rifle mural.  Nychos new piece in San Francisco finds a tiger literally jumping out of its skin.  Finally, we have an awesome collaboration between artists POSE and Revok that followed their dual exhibit at the Jonathan Levine Gallery.

Photography, Performance, Video, And Cardboard Cut-Outs Combine For One Volatile Installation

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Katya Grokhovsky‘s series Untitled Heroic is deeply complex and familiarly conflicted.  For the series Grokhovsky makes use any medium necessary – photography, performance, video, and even a cardboard cut-out installation.  The artist seems to attract and repel.  The series is at once confrontational, seductive, and wonderfully volatile.  By way of her statement, Grokhovsky says that Untitled Heroic is, “A series of performances for photography and video, culminating in a large-scale cutboard cutout installation, whereby a female artist is dealing with frustrating desire to both attract and reject the notion of a male gaze.”  Grokohovsky’s work is also the subject of an upcoming solo exhibit at New York’s Galerie Protégé.

Photographs Of Strangers Being Intimate

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What may be most affecting about Richard Renaldi‘s series Touching Strangers is how clearly he captures something that can’t even be seen.  For the series Renaldi posed strangers together to be photographed in poses with an intimacy typically reserved for families or friends.  Arms around shoulders and waists, hands on hands, fingers interlocked are subtle gestures.  Between strangers, though, they reveal a powerful privacy we carry around with us, a sacred space rarely breached.  Once a viewer discovers the subjects are strangers, these otherwise banal photographs suddenly become intensely unsettling.

Flat Resalvaged Wood Sculptures Look Incredibly Three Dimensional

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Dutch artist Ron van der Ende‘s artworks at once deceiving and straightforward.  His wall mounted sculptures are much shallower than they may appear.  Not more than six inches deep the carefully painted bas relief pieces suggest a depth that extends beyond the wall.  This deception of perspective extends into the works’ content.  For example, a humble grain of salt depicted monumentally as if it were some extraterrestrial object.  However, van der Ende never forgets his material or attempts to hide the art’s point of origin.  For all of the trompe l’oeil effects and meticulous carving, the salvaged wood always seems to seep through.  In this way the material determines the piece as a whole, and anything secret isn’t hidden far off.

You can see Ron van der Ende’s exhibition Phasmid currently on view at Ambach & Rice gallery in Los Angeles through the 27th of July.

Ambitious Two Year Street Art Project Tackles Suburbia

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Ian Strange: SUBURBAN from Ian Strange [KID ZOOM] on Vimeo.

Australian artist Ian Strange‘s ambitious project two year in the making is difficult to pin down.  SUBURBAN isn’t quite installation, photography, performance, or video art – its really more than all of these.  The project is really Ian Strange’s investigation of and interaction with the idea of suburbia.  The sidewalk, front yard, middle class, ubiquitous rows of homes have grown with a generation of young people, and now with a second and third.  The neighborhoods and houses themselves have become symbols of something beyond their function that Strange’s work seems to seek and find.  Check out the video to get a preview of the upcoming exhibit.