Bringing The Outside In With Abelardo Morell’s Camera Obscura

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Photographer Abelardo Morell brings that outdoors in in his series Camera Obscura. Morell installs a lens or prism in a window and transforms an entire room into a camera obscura. The view outside is then projected on the opposing wall – upside down through the lens and right side up through the prism. A long-exposure photograph captures the outside world as its projected within the room. He says of the process and series:

“Over time, this project has taken me from my living room to all sorts of interiors around the world. One of the satisfactions I get from making this imagery comes from my seeing the weird and yet natural marriage of the inside and outside.

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Colored Pencil Drawings Of Chewing Gum

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The first fantastically pliable medium we ever enjoyed sloppily sculpting with our teeth, molding around our gums, and blowing joyful pockets of life into, is the perfect subject matter for artist Julie Randall, whose entire body of work teeters between mystical and marvelously grotesque.

“Blown,” her most recent series, is a deep meditation on, yes, chewing gum: it’s strange shapely pleasure, born from a certain oral fixation which moves beyond youth and into darker more cryptic mouths. 

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Wim Delvoye’s Intricate, Twisted Gothic Towers

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Belgian artist Wim Delvoye is rolling out a new installation at the Sperone Westwater this month, composed of his iconic site-specific laser-cut metal towers. Intricate, decorative architectural spirals are made even more fascinating with Delvoye’s sly, humorous metal manipulations. Aided by the seemingly limitless possibilities of computer-aided design tools, he is able to execute mind-blowingly detailed sculptural works. Some pieces are pristine, acting as models for larger sculptural installations made of heavy, untreated steel. Once the actual pieces are created and placed in Delvoye’s chosen site, the sculptures quickly take on a rusted patina—and an instant “aged” look that makes each piece seem like it has existed there for centuries, even though it’s work that could only be made in present day.

His work is on view at the Sperone Westwater In NYC from May 10th – June 28th, 2013.

A Neon Message From Your Environment

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We interrupt this broadcast to bring you an important message from your environment courtesy of Jung Lee, master translator, whose photographs place neon signage in unconventional places, working as emotive subtitles.

Each piece reminds us– it’s not necessarily the people we are searching for in relation to love, but the lingering romanticism of time and space: the feeling of earth cradling our fall.

New Hyperrealistic Sculptures from Ron Mueck

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As the Fondation Cartier points out, ‘a Ron Mueck exhibition is a rare event.”  His hyperrealistic sculptures are worked over carefully for countless hours.  Thus new work is especially exciting.  Mueck’s current exhibit at the Fondation Cartier introduces three new sculptures.  Couple Under an Umbrella, featured here, illustrates Mueck’s style well.  His amazingly lifelike sculptures are only betrayed as inanimate objects by their surreal size.  The giant couple beside their creator makes for a bewildering sense of scale and reality.  [via]

Igor Eskinja Creates Optical Illusions With Simple Materials

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Igor Eskinja’s simplistic installations are elegant and optical illusory. Using basic and inexpensive materials such as tape, wires, and cords, Eskinja practices his art with precise measurements and an architectural eye. His work straddles the transition between 2D and 3D perception. He thoughtfully uses the space of the wall and floor of his installations, requiring viewers to stand at a particular angle in order to experience the effect given in these photos. The simplicity of his form and the perception between what is visible and not introduce space for interpretation and meaning. Oftentimes, after the installation is over, the work is thrown out due to the instability of his work, drawing attention to the impermanence of the forms he creates.

The Direct And Poetic Installations of Adel Abdessemed

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The work of artist Adel Abdessemed is at once direct and poetic.  He often uses common imagery and objects as a point of departure.  However, the mundane beginnings of these objects only further underscore the weighty nature of his art.  Abdessemed’s installations are able to provoke a sudden impact of its viewer.  Still, the installations communicate complex ideas that unfold over extended viewing.  At times controversial, his work is effective in piquing thought and discussion.

Claire Falkenberg’s Eerily Painted Apparitions

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With a toxic mix of oil-based paint, the surfaces of artist Claire Falkenberg‘s large-scale photos are transformed into mysterious and eerie clouds.  The ominous, milky clouds obscure the space directly in front of the photographer, delaying the viewer’s ability to understand what lies just under the surface of each picture plane. This inclusion is generous, because it offers another layer of surface detail to the viewer who is willing to inspect the ghostly swirls of oil paint. The slick, snapshot-style images of trash slowly begin to reveal themselves—vanishing almost entirely at the center, and bringing into question just exactly what Falkenberg has chosen to cover up in her series.