A’ Design Awards & Competition – Call For Submissions

Images of The Other Me by Tomo Miura

Images of The Other Me by Tomo Miura

Snow Breweries-Ying Xiong Pu Beer by Tiger Pan

PIXIO Magnetic Сonstruction Set by Ivan Khalus and Oleh Berezovskyi

PIXIO Magnetic Сonstruction Set by Ivan Khalus and Oleh Berezovskyi

Images of Arachne- A 3D Printed Building Facade by Lei Yu

Awards are the icing on your CV, if you know what I mean. So why not take advantage of a new entry date for A’ Design Award and Competition?

Essentially, the A’ Design Award and Competition is the world’s most inclusive and largest design competition that rewards creatives with highly sought-after prizes and industry insights and feedback. It aims to highlight the best designs, concepts and design-oriented products around the globe each year. The deadline for submission is September 30th, 2018.

If you’re a designer (of any kind), there is a category in the competition for you. The full list includes 100 different categories such as Good Industrial Design, Good Architecture Design, Good Product Design, Good Communication Design, Good Service Design and Good Fashion Design. You can find more design categories here.

Nominate your designs for award consideration here.

Advertise here !!!

Cleverly Designed Sustainable And Interactive Food Packaging By Tomorrow Machine

Tomorrow-Machine-Design-Packaging-1

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. - A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. This package is made for oil-based food.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. – A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. This package is made for oil-based food.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. - To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water.

This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package. – To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water.

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This Too Shall Pass, 2012. Oil package.

Swedish design studio Tomorrow Machine experiments with unusual materials to create revolutionary food packaging concepts. Pursuing the modernist principle of form follows function, Tomorrow Machine unites visual appeal with highly innovative and operational technologies to create both aesthetic and pragmatic design.

Their project This Too Shall Pass addresses the increasing issue of environmental pollution and recycling. Using biodegradable materials, studio has created food packaging that shares the symbiotic life span with the food housed inside. Vividly colored and minimalist in shape, these concept containers for oils, dry foods and liquids disintegrate when the contents they store are used.

“Is it reasonable that it takes several years for a milk carton to decompose naturally, when the milk goes sour after a week? “This Too Shall Pass” is a series of food packaging were the packaging has the same short life-span as the foods they contain. The package and its content is working in symbiosis.”

Besides their environmentally friendly attempts, Tomorrow Machine creates interactive product packaging to shape the innovations of tomorrow. Collaborating with Swedish research company Innventia, designers created self-opening and self-expanding packages based on the use of the 100% biodegradable material they developed together. According to Tomorrow Machine, “this is the new generation of sustainable package design, using materials that are both smart and environmentally friendly”. (via Packaging | Uqam)

Advertise here !!!

Collaborative Team’s Chandelier Shadows Room With Trees

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Forms in Nature from Yeray Lopez Portillo on Vimeo.

Artists/design team Thyra Hilden and Pio Diaz collaborated to create, Forms in Nature, a chandelier which, when alight, creates shadows in any (reasonably sized) room that appear to be intertwined tree branches or entire root system. Describing their collaborative process as combining “existing cultural icons and basic elements, which they transform and modify to tamper with the common perception”, the duo essentially reconnects modern technology to more primitive, natural elements.

The creators say of the piece, “The shadows engulf the room and transforms the walls into unruly shadows of branches, bushes, and gnarled trees. Mirrorings are thrown out upon the walls and ceilings and provide weak Rorschach-like hints of faces, life and flow of consciousness.” (via mymodernmet) 

Edible Art Supplies: Design Firm Nendo Creates Chocolate Paint Tubes and Pencils

Nendo - Chocolate Art Supplies Nendo - Chocolate Art Supplies Nendo - Chocolate Art Supplies

If you have a huge sweet tooth like I do, then the chocolate art supplies by design firm Nendo are probably whetting your appetite. These tubes of paint and pencils are completely edible, and the paint tubes are full of different sweet fillings. You can sharpen the “pencils” and use the shavings to enhance other desserts.

Nendo originally created the chocolate pencils in 2007 for patissier Tsujiguchi Hironobu. Art and cooking (especially the art of plating food) go hand in hand, and the designers considered this with their initial idea. They write:

We wanted our plates to show off the beauty of meals and desserts like a painting on a canvas. Based on this idea, our “chocolate pencils” come in a number of cocoa blends that vary in intensity, and chocophiles can use the special “pencil sharpener” that comes with our plate to grate chocolate onto their dessert. Pencil filings are usually the unwanted remains of sharpening a pencil, but in this case, they’re the star!

The paint tubes have an edible label that tell you what flavored syrup to expect. They range from green tea to honey to caramel. Nendo describes their new creation as “…design that combines the childhood excitement of opening a new box of paints and the thrill of opening a box of chocolates you’ve been given unexpectedly.” What a perfect gift for someone who is both a sweets and artist. Yum! (Via This Is Colossal and Yatzer)

Eric Johnson’s Reclaimed Furniture Design

Eric Johnson is a brilliant carpenter who designs and builds furniture out of completely salvaged materials. Armchairs from boat masts, rocking chairs from milk crates, lamps from moped scraps. A lot of “recycled” product design can end up looking not too different from the garbage it started out as, but Johnson does an incredible job of using clean, shrewd designs to make objects that stand on their own regardless of their history. The combination of his intelligent designs and recycled materials is inspiring in its own right too, quietly encouraging us all to see the potential in the mountains of discarded objects that overwhelm our modern lives. So kudos on three levels, Eric. Keep your eyes on Mr. Johnson, I smell a bright future.

Izhar Gafni’s $20 Cardboard Bicycle

Israeli inventor Izhar Gafni recently developed a bicycle that is pretty amazing in a lot of different ways. Not only is it made out of cardboard, it’s sustainable, durable, functional, super light, looks like a bike, and only costs 9$ to produce, which means he can sell it for $20 a piece. Everything about it is amazing. Not the least of which is his inspiring determination to realize such a seemingly impossible idea. I’m really crossing my fingers that this goes into mega production and opens some doors for a lot of people who wouldn’t otherwise have access to the wonderful world of bicycles and transportation. Watch the video after the jump to see his process; it’s a real day-maker.( via )

Bina Baitel’s Hybrid Furniture


Bina Baitel
 is a French product designer whose takes previously distinct pieces of furniture–futons, stools, lamps– and combines them to make some wild looking objects. Like most great product design, they look more like sculptures than they do products. We could all probably use some more melting lamps in our lives. (via)

Kristine Five Melvaer’s Designer Lamps that Look like Plant Buds and Water Droplets

 

Kristine Five Melvær is a Norwegian designer who brings a really subtle, but affective approach to the table. This Bloom lamp series is great. Inspired by natural forms, the shades call to mind “buds, fruit, or water”. Each of the three lamps are a different height, which promotes a sense of organic incongruity.  The shades are made of canvas, which, though a possible fire hazard, goes along nicely with the earthy vibe of each piece. (via)