Get Social:

Mother And Daughter Collaborate On Surreal Illustrations

HendricksIllustration2 HendricksIllustration4 HendricksIllustration5 Mother And Daughter

It’s hard not to be absolutely delighted with this story and these illustrations. Mica Angela Hendricks is an illustrator and graphic artist who used to keep her art projects separate from her daughter’s as a way to maintain control of artistic direction. One day, that changed when her 4-year-old insisted that Hendricks share her new sketchbook with her, finally berating her with, “we might have to take it away if you can’t share,” something Hendricks told her daughter often. So Hendricks let her finish the bodies of many faces she’d started (informed by old black and white movie stills), and was surprised and delighted with the results. Hendricks claims her daughter often has a focused direction when finishing a piece, and that her imagination is unpredictable.

After her daughter finishes drawing, Hendricks adds color and highlights, texture and painting to complete them. Her daughter critques most of them a bit harshly, but ultimately enjoys their collaboration. As for Hendricks, the collaboration means more to her than the creation of interesting and unique illustrations:

“…From it all, here are the lessons I learned: to try not to be so rigid. Yes, some things (like my new sketchbook) are sacred, but if you let go of those chains, new and wonderful things can happen. Those things you hold so dear cannot change and grow and expand unless you loosen your grip on them a little. In sharing my artwork and allowing our daughter to be an equal in our collaborations, I helped solidify her confidence, which is way more precious than any doodle I could have done. In her mind, her contributions were as valid as mine (and in truth, they really were). Most importantly, I learned that if you have a preconceived notion of how something should be, YOU WILL ALWAYS BE DISAPPOINTED. Instead, just go with it, just ACCEPT it, because usually something even more wonderful will come out of it.”

You can purchase prints of these delightful illustrations here. (via)

Advertise here !!!

Advertise here !!!

Clemens Behr

Jaw-dropping installations made from cardboard and tape, colorful and geometric paintings on discarded wood or subway car interiors, highly-patterned murals on the streets — Clemens Behr creates a little bit of everything. Or, rather, the Berlin-based artist makes A LOT of everything, much to the delight of his followers. Full disclosure: Yes, I am one such enthusiast.  

View/Source exhibition at Think Tank Gallery

VIEW / SOURCE presents two conflicting projects that deal with the phenomenon of “source code” hidden within our everyday experiences. Friedland’s work explores the integration of cross-lateral human understandings, while Manos’ systems aim to speculate their irrelevance. Two B/D featured artists will be presenting work at Think Tank Gallery in downtown LA this thursday! Aurelia Friedland (B/D feature), and Matt Manos (Book 1, Future Perfect, and B/D feature).

Opening: 12/08/11, 7-11 PM
By Appointment through 12/17/11

Ian Pfaff

Ian Pfaff’s demo reel is a classic. In my mind, the guy nailed it. While partying really, really, hard while on spring break, Ian multitasks by writing, editing, directing, animating, building props, and making music. All around killer.

VIA ChangeTheThought

Renaud Marion’s Floating Cars Of The Future

Hover boards are still not a reality and cars don’t fly in space. We all know this. However reality didn’t stop Michael J. Fox from skating in the sky and it sure as hell didn’t stop French photographer Renaud Marion from creating this extremely well executed series of classic cars that have been turned into sleek floating vehicles of the future. Marion kept all the best elements of the classic rides sans the wheels to create cars that even the Jetsons would be proud to ride in. (via)

Stefan Fürtbauer’s Viennese Fast Food Stops

Stefan Fürtbauer’s Eiterquellen project is an ongoing series of photographs documenting the Viennese diners and fast food culture. Most of the time these diners are isolated islands of food with their own unique look and style, resisting the global look (and probably taste) of the fast food chains that most of us are familiar with.

Mitch Griffiths’ Paintings Mix Old Master Technique With Contemporary Culture

British artist Mitch Griffiths‘ work is inspired by the light and the composition of the Old Masters, but his context and content depict issues that concern modern culture. In his work, Griffiths addresses the disposable nature of contemporary culture by immortalizing this transience with the perceived permanence of the painting medium. His figurative portraits are dark and foreboding and often turbulent. The drama depicted in his paintings, though contemporary, feels universal, historical, and personal. Though many of his images resonate with religious iconography, the “symbolism reflects a modern quest for redemption from the overriding self-obsession and consumerism of contemporary society, with its vanity and greed, addictions and needless suffering.”