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Subway Emerging from a Museum Floor

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Artist Zsuzsi Csiszer’s installation may at first seem massively out of place.  An actual subway car emerges out of the floor into the Museum Kiscelli in Budapest.  It seems poised to make a stop and move on to its next otherworldly destination.  The subway clearly references a journey – one of more significance than just from one neighborhood to another.  More importantly perhaps, subway cars transport groups of people.  Maybe it sounds cheesy, but the piece is similar to a larger journey we all make.  One in which we share with various people who come and go.

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Artist Catches Commuters Who Drive Distracted And Exposes Them On Billboards

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We know texting while driving is really dangerous. But, unfortunately, most of us still probably sneak a peek at their phone every once and awhile. Artist Brian Singer, AKA Someguy, got fed up with all of the Bay area commuters he saw on their phones and decided to take action. While sitting the passengers seat, he snapped photos of all of the people that were distracted driving. He then took it one step further and purchased ad space on a few area billboards and posted his findings. He titled the project TWIT Spotting (Texting While in Traffic).  Afterwards, he began a website in order to share more photos and include facts about the dangers of being on your phone while driving.

TWIT Spotting has received an overwhelming response and sparked controversy. It confronts those making these errors on the same roads where they occur, and it starts a conversation about this preventable problem. But, at the same time, the project was criticized as public shaming and an invasion of privacy. Singer sees this as a means to an end, and his goal is enact change by starting a dialogue. In an interview with Vice’s The Creators Project, he wants to expand the project, and explains:

What I would love is for one of the organizations who are passionate about this to help me. We’d focus on impacting teenage drivers. How can we expand this beyond what I can do? What if the AdCouncil got involved or a cell phone company or an insurance company? We might lose the localized aspect and diminished the neighborhood-focused nuances, but it could have a greater effect on behavior overall, which is ultimately the end goal. (Via The Creators Project)

Brian Cooper’s Trompe L’oeil Paintings

Los Angeles based artist Brian Cooper’s paintings look like the supply room of a crazed woodworker who has piled building materials from floor to ceiling. Employing  trompe l’oeil techniques that dazzle the eye these maze-like piles of wood, debris, tape, and other building materials are chipped away at, cut, torn, ripped, and gnawed at to reveal secret messages and Coopers personal arsenal of hieroglyphics.

“I make paintings that struggle with their function as devices for transcendent harmony. They do their job while acknowledging the disorder and uncertainty from which they come.”

When Cooper isn’t busy in the painting studio making beautiful paintings he is creating supersonic sounds with his band Earth Like Planets. Watch his latest music video for ELP after the jump.

 

An Interactive Building That Changes Colors Depending On Your Perspective And Time Of Day

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Founder of Los Angeles-based architecture and design studio Urbana, Rob Ley has yet made another venture into the world of interactive architectural installations. This time large-scale. His project “May-September” features a field of 7,000 angled multi-color metal panels constructed onto the facade of Eskenazi Hospital in Indianapolis.

According to Ley, the project began when he started wondering about the typical notion of the parking structure. Often these huge concrete constructions are unappreciated and ignored by public. Ley posed himself a challenge to turn it into a dynamic system that would interact with the viewers as they pass it by.

Together with Indianapolis Fabrications, they’ve built a huge angular aluminum and stainless steel installation (12,500 square feet) that also features an east/west color strategy (yellow and blue). The visual experience of changing colors and patterns depends on observers’ perspective and speed when they move across the hospital grounds or drive along the street. The piece also interacts with nature as every sun beam or cloud can shape the hues and saturation of colors.

As in nature, the volume and shade offered by the piece shies away from harsh, geometric patterning – instead tending towards a gentle, dappled variability in form <…> [parts of installation] work together as brush strokes to create a dynamic façade <…>.

Graffiti Ain’t Half As Bad When It’s In A Hotel

 

 

 

Welcome to the hotel Au Vieux Panier in Marseille, France where graffiti artist Tilt has literally painted graffiti on half of the room. Covering every square inch of exactly half of the room with a mix of tags, throw ups, and more drips than your last DIY paint project,  I cant help but think that Tilt’s room is a metaphor for the double lives that most graffiti artists lead. By day they are a minimalist going to work and paying your taxes and by night you are busy climbing billboards and vandalizing everything in sight.  (images big addict, via my modern met)

Meera Lee

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Illustrator Meera Lee does lovely work. What appealed to me was the mix of simple compositions with textured detail. Along with illustration, she also does watercolor and photography. You can purchase her prints here!