Get Social:

Serrah Russell’s Muted Body As Landscape Photographs

Serrah Russell lives and works in Seattle, WA. Using instant film her work often presents the body as an ominous muted landscape. Her close-up snap shots take on the form of hazy abstractions. Her work has been described as a way to “illuminate the permanent effect that actions trace upon their environment. Her works are a tangible remnant of an abstracted and often autobiographical narrative of immutable occurrences that move forward in a flux of nature, culture and time.”

Advertise here !!!

Jonathan Monaghan’s Dauphin 007


Jonathan Monaghan updates us with his latest surreal story about a lion losing his crown and more importantly his head. Watch the full video after the jump.

Advertise here !!!

Family Photograph Geometric Collages From Randy Grskovic

Randy Grskovic rearranges family photographs.  He slices found photographs into geometric abstractions.  What were once cherished images of memories are now emptied of their sentimental meaning.  Grskovic’s collages draw attention to the process of photographing ourselves – making images of ourselves for posterity.  While photographs are often considered true and trusted documents of past events, Grskovic’s work encourages viewers to be skeptical of the idea of their objective nature.  He says:

“The memory has changed and so has the document. The photograph as well as any other document is never an accurate depiction of truth.” [via]

Dan Olsen

Dan Olsen is proof that the midwest (Toledo, OH) creates the most tripped out, bugged out, and amazing artists. I can stare at his humorous and surreal drawings  for days thinking that if I just squint my eyes a bit more I’ll unlock their epic psychedelic meaning and change my life forever. Also make sure to check out his equally bizarre collages after the jump.

Shoplifter’s Vibrant Sculptures Made With Hair

Icelandic artist Shoplifter aka Hrafnhildur Arnardottir lives and works in New York. “Her body of work as a whole exists in the gray area between visual art, performance, and design. Shoplifter has worked for several years exploring the use and symbolic nature of hair, and its visual and artistic potential. For Shoplifter hair is the ultimate thread that grows from our body. Hair is an original, creative fiber, a way for people to distinguish themselves as individuals, and often an art form. Humor plays a large roll in her life and work, sometimes subtly, but other times taking over. This humor extends to her love of playing with the juxtaposition of opposites. Like with her hair pieces- they appear beautiful evoking natural forms and plant life, but at the same time hair is considered grotesque and disturbing when it is not attached to the body, like hair in the shower drain. She uses traditional handcraft techniques like knitting, weaving, and braiding to create new forms of textiles, while referring to established methods in art. She is attracted to the playfulness found in folk art, naïvism, and handicraft which all have a strong influence on her organic process of creating work.”

Portraits Taken With A Poloroid Aura Camera

Carlo Van de Roer photography4 Carlo Van de Roer photography3

Carlo Van de Roer photography5

Carlo Van de Roer‘s Portrait Machine series is a special kind of portrait photography.  De Roer’s portraits are of friends, family, and well known personalities (you may have recognized Miranda July in the first photograph) with a Polaroid Aura Camera.  Related to spirit photography, Aura photography uses electromagnetic readings to create the “auras” of colors in the photographs as well as a report explaining the reading.  Though the process, readings, and reports are hardly scientific, they reveal much about how much we invest in portraiture.  We continually attempt to translate an inner person from outer appearances, particular from a person’s face.  The aura photography further reveals to what extent each person can be a mystery to another, even between those familiar to each other.

Liz Insogna’s Afterlife

Liz Insogna‘s Afterlife draws from Greek mythology surrounding the realm of Hades. Two bodies of water, Lethe and the Pool of Memory, offer dead souls a couple of options in how they want to handle their past life’s memories when reincarnated. Common souls flocked to Lethe to wipe the slate clean. For those who resisted the temptation of Lethe and convinced the guards to let them pass, the Pool of Memory promised knowledge of past lives as well as the future well into your new life.
It’s a rich territory that Liz Insogna explores with dream-like watercolors and oils, lingering, swirling and fading near subjects that seem despondent.

James Jean

Taiwanese artist James Jean creates beautiful illustrations and paintings. He lives and works in Los Angeles.