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Brian Belott and Jesse Greenberg, W.U.W.

Funk upon a time, Brian Belott and Jesse Greenberg teamed up to create a two man show for Gallery Loyal in Sweden.  I was wondering how to explain the work, but in the press release it says that “Not being able to pin down exactly what these objects are referring to is one of their powers,” so it’s better unexplained.  I asked Brian about the power of not knowing and funkiness once, and he explained that working funky meant the difference between drawing inspiration from the sadness of the Blues, or the celebration of George Clinton and Parliment Funkadelic.  The work in this show feels like a mash up between the ancient Egyptian religion, which at the time was thought to keep the sun rising, and today’s science fiction; a mythological range from prehistory to the future, it either expands time or contracts it depending on whether you like the Blues or P-Funk.

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Kim Dorland

Picture 7 A while back I had a chance to do an interview with artist Kim Dorland-  and was excited to learn that his show will be opening at Mark Moore gallery this Saturday, March 20th! I haven’t gotten a chance to see them in person yet, but these works are gorgeous. Dorland makes use of a sumptuous impasto creating narratives that are visceral, expansive and nostalgic all at once…all the more reason to see them in person.

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Masha Rumyantseva

A nice selection of collages from russian illustrator Masha Rumyantseva that will simultaneously take you back in time and bring you to a new future.

Ivan Sanjuan

ivan sanjuan space treeHere is some nice atmospheric work from Spanish photographer Ivan Sanjuan.  His hazy imagery fits the mood of this rainy Thursday quite well.

Dennis McNett

Dennis Mcnett

Is that an amazing relief print I spy? I do believe it is!! Dennis McNett puts his impressive carving ability to work, making striking woodblock prints that tend to include mythical animal imagery. McNett, who teaches printmaking at the Pratt Institute in New York, has also designed killer graphics for Vans, Anti-Hero skateboards, Volcom and Adidas, so you could say that he’s got the serious skills to pay the bills.

Phil Ferguson Crochets Delectable Foods To Wear On Your Head

Phil-Ferguson-4 Phil-Ferguson-8 Phil-Ferguson-7 Phil-Ferguson-1

It’s no secret that Melbourne-based artist Phil Ferguson is fond of food. After all, giant slices of crocheted pizza, cracked eggs, bacon, hot dogs, and much more are strapped onto the top or side of his head. They take the form of decorative hats and costumes that frame the wearer’s face, and their larger-than-life scale makes them a delight. Ferguson posts as @chiliphilly on Instagram where he has 14.2K fans (at the time of writing).

The artist is originally from Perth in Western Australia, and he started crocheting the food and sharing on Instagram as a way to connect with other artists in the area. It all began with a burger that was inspired by Tuck Shop Take Away, his place of work. “From that point onward I thought about how to do food hats,” he told Daily Mail. “[Food] has been the most accessible thing people can relate to and it will stay that way until I’m bored.

Depending on the design, Ferguson is able to complete a piece in two to three days. The artist describes himself as a self-taught crocheter (he watched instructional YouTube videos) who has never learnt to read patterns. Even so, he’s crafted 24 delectable creations so far. (Via Daily Mail and Milk Made)

Animal Sculptures Created Out Of Plastic Beach Litter

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

French artist Gilles Cenazandotti constructs life-size animals out of litter he’s combed from beaches, recycling a variety of plastics and other detritus. Titled, “Future Bestiary,” this series of sculptures directly addresses problems related to throw-away culture and the waste that results from conspicuous consumption. When the creatures are inserted into natural landscapes, they almost appear digitally rendered because the contrast between natural and man-made elements is so pronounced. Of his work, Cenazandotti says,

“Impressed by everything that the Sea, in turn, rejects and transforms, on the beaches I harvest the products derived from petroleum and its industry. The choice of animals that are part of the endangered species completes this process. In covering these animals with a new skin harvested from the banks of the Sea, I hope to draw attention to this possible metamorphosis – to create a trompe l’oeil of a modified reality.” (via laughing squid and junk culture)

Milana Braslavsky

I know I may be partial to artists who went to the same  art school as me (Maryland Institute College Of Art) but Milana Braslavsky’s photographs are downright quirky, playful, funny, and most importantly Beautiful. For some reason all the figures in her photos remind me of quirky art school girls with thick rimmed glasses who listen to Buddy Holly albums on vinyl.