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Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

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The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

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Chocolate Nikes, Golden Sewer Grates, And Leather Park Benches By Joost Goudriaan

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Often it seems the most useful objects are the most overlooked.  Much of the work of artist and designer Joost Goudriaan is set upon changing our relationship with such items.    A park bench, an object whose aesthetic is nearly entirely defined by its use, is transformed with traditional craftsmanship.  Goudrian uses leather and walnut wood to turn a typically stark bench into luxuriant public seating.  Also pictured, is a replica of the classic Nike Air Max made from chocolate.  While the original may be prized and collected, Goudriaan compelled anyone who bought his chocolate replica to sign a contract stipulating that they would eat the shoe.

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Robert Buelteman Scalps, Electrocutes And Paints On Flowers To Create Exquisite Camera-Free Pictures

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Flowers and plants glowing in the dark. These pictures are the result of a titanesque work performed on each nature based element by Robert Buelteman. The California based artist is not using anything else than flowers, photographic films, electricity and a fiber-optic probe to create his work. The result is captivating and intriguing.

Robert Buelteman starts his process by picking fresh flowers and plants from a field. He lays them onto a photographic film in darkness after scalping them until they are sheer. He then throws a 80,000 volts current with his car battery, illuminating their unique energy field and exposing the film to their ultraviolet corona.
The artist painstakingly applies the fiber-optic probe, which is the size of a human hair. By tracing over the shapes, some light is reflected, some absorbed, but the light that penetrates the subject exposes the film with the color and form of its’ source. This method requires, for a one successful picture at least 150 tries.

This camera-free, non-digital process only uses the natural and genuine energy of the plants. A statement dear to Robert Buelteman, a former classic photographer, who decided to counteract the growth of digitalized photography by going back to simplicity and craftsmanship. His is attempting to demonstrate that creativity is in the hands of everyone, for the ones that are willing to put the work. And that a piece or art doesn’t need to have a particular meaning. He prefers to let the electrocuted flowers speak for themselves.

Robert Bueltman’s pieces will be displayed at Adler & Co Gallery in San Fransisco until December 28th 2015

Andreas Fischer

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Andreas Fischer’s “Ghost Town” is currently on view in our lovely city of Chicago. Ghost Town, which is on view at two separate venues, Hyde Park Art Center and The Gahlberg Gallery, shows us two distinct selections of Andreas’s portraiture and imagined landscapes. There is a nice anonymous quality to these  locations and figures, with titles like “Original Location” and “Sunday Best”. Plus, the work actually becomes more engaging after you read about it, which in my opinion, is often not the case.

The Culture Of Thailand’s Ladyboys

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In Thailand, the term ladyboy is a nickname for transgender women, and they are a population often met with intolerance and prejudice. Their place in society is explored through photographer Soopakorn Srisakul’s series Mistress, in which he captures the daily life of his girlfriend and four other ladyboys. They all work at bars and as call girls in the infamous red-light Nana district in Bangkok.

Srisakul’s images are his journey in understanding his partner and the others experiences. There are few positions that are hiring transgendered women, so this community typically finds work in department stores, makeup counters, and cabaret venues. Those that are bargirls generally make better the better wages, which allows them to save up for gender reassignment surgeries.

Mistress presents us with poignant pictures of both work and home. There are moments of dark clubs, sure, but there are also quiet scenes in bright bedrooms. Srisakul writes:

They go out working, come back to their room, go relaxing outside, occasionally go back to visit family in the countryside, and then go to work. They, like anyone else, just try to get by. They laugh for joy, cry for sorrow, they work to earn a living, and they have an argument with their boyfriend, just like anyone else. In this sense, what makes them so different from us as to warrant a harsh treatment from the moral society, and do they deserve it at all? (Via Feature Shoot)

Plywerk Your Work Contest Winners!

Thanks to everyone who submitted their artwork in our Plywerk Your Work contest. Unfortunately though, we can only have one winner…

Artwork by Natalia Sanabria

…congrats to Miss Natalia Sanabria, artist, photographer, and designer based in Costa Rica! We really liked her collage and fashion illustration-esque elements. Runner ups are after the cut. Keep making awesome art! We’ll keep having more contests like this in the future.

Scott Hocking’s Bad Graffiti

Scott Hocking has documented one of my favorite things, bad graffiti. Starting in 2007 scott has photographed hundreds of scribbles in and around Detroit. Maybe it’s the shakey lettering, potty mouth humor,  or the never ending typos but I rather see some bad graffiti over real graffiti any ol’ day.