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Garbage Played Their Last Headline Show Of The Year At A Casino… Everybody Won!

Shirley Manson from Garbage sings to an adoring fan, “Why do you Love me?” at the San Manuel Casino on December 6, 2012.

It was a long trek in rush hour traffic from Los Angeles to Highland, CA to see Garbage‘s final headline show of the year at the San Manuel Casino, but well worth it! I was lucky enough to catch their “rehearsal” back in early April at the Bootleg Theatre and I can tell you that even after touring most of the year (Shirley announced that this was their 100th show of the tour), they still have incredible energy and power and obviously love playing together.

They performed songs from their new record Not Your Kind Of People and of course many  hits from their entire catalogue. During the opening of Stupid Girl, Shirley went down and did 20 perfect push-ups sharing with the crowd that she’s still in amazing shape after all these years. I’m sure I’m not the only one that would pay to see Gwen “Abs of Steel” Stefani and Shirley Manson in a push-up contest. Shirley went on to dedicate, #1 Crush to Bean from KROQ’s Kevin & Bean morning show stating how incredible and brave he was. Bean recently underwent kidney transplant surgery to help long time KROQ staffer Scott Mason, It was actually one of the most touching song dedications I have ever heard at a concert.

Garbage heads to New Zealand and Australia starting in February, 2013 so definitely check them out if you’re able to!

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Across Borders: A Haunting Photographic Journey Shows The Stark Reality Of Illegal Immigration Into America

Gonzalo, turned 22 during his trip as an undocumented person in Mexico. His family in Honduras hopes that he’ll make it to the U.S. He left a message on this board for his wife and 9 month old daughter: "Lorena, Rafaela, I miss you a lot. Back soon " - Ixtepec, Oaxaca, 2011

Gonzalo, turned 22 during his trip as an undocumented person in Mexico. His family in Honduras hopes that he’ll make it to the U.S. He left a message on this board for his wife and 9 month old daughter: “Lorena, Rafaela, I miss you a lot. Back soon ” – Ixtepec, Oaxaca, 2011

The Backpack of Salvador Santo. Salvador Santo, 21, has written inside the phone number of a relative in Honduras. The need to hide information arises to prevent abductions and extortion of family while he crosses Mexico. According to the National System of Public Security (SNSP), abductions reported to the Attorney General in 2013 were more than 3,600 cases compared to 1,259 in 2012. - D.F., Mexico, 2014

The Backpack of Salvador Santo. Salvador Santo, 21, has written inside the phone number of a relative in Honduras. The need to hide information arises to prevent abductions and extortion of family while he crosses Mexico. According to the National System of Public Security (SNSP), abductions reported to the Attorney General in 2013 were more than 3,600 cases compared to 1,259 in 2012. – D.F., Mexico, 2014

Wendy fled from Honduras with her three children (Jared of 18 months, Jazmin of 3 years, and Eduardo of 8) because of the attempted murder she suffered by her husband, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha 18, one of two of the largest gangs in Central America. The complaint filed against her husband for domestic and sexual violence towards her and their three children had no solution in Honduras due to corruption. - Tapachula, Chiapas, 2014

Wendy fled from Honduras with her three children (Jared of 18 months, Jazmin of 3 years, and Eduardo of 8) because of the attempted murder she suffered by her husband, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha 18, one of two of the largest gangs in Central America. The complaint filed against her husband for domestic and sexual violence towards her and their three children had no solution in Honduras due to corruption. – Tapachula, Chiapas, 2014

(pictured left) Armando, El Salvador. His destination was the United States, but he was deported in Baja California while riding in the cargo train crossing Mexico. He wanted to retry the trip as undocumented via Tenosique, Tabasco. This time, while trying to get on the train, he fell and the very train amputated his arm. He awaits the document certifying him as a refugee. - Tapachula, Chiapas, 2014.  (pictured right) Celso’s prosthesis. Celso, Honduras, 31, victim of an accident while riding the freight train they call the Beast. - Tapachula, Mexico, 2014

(pictured left) Armando, El Salvador. His destination was the United States, but he was deported in Baja California while riding in the cargo train crossing Mexico. He wanted to retry the trip as undocumented via Tenosique, Tabasco. This time, while trying to get on the train, he fell and the very train amputated his arm. He awaits the document certifying him as a refugee. – Tapachula, Chiapas, 2014.
(pictured right) Celso’s prosthesis. Celso, Honduras, 31, victim of an accident while riding the freight train they call the Beast. – Tapachula, Mexico, 2014

Photographer Nicola Okin Frioli has been documenting the heartbreak, failures, misery, grief and victimization of thousands of migrants over the past twelve years. Having extensively traveled and documented his way through Northern Mexico, India, Pakistan, Kashmir, and Sardinia, Frioli has seen the desperate measures people will go to in order to create a better future for themselves and their families.

His latest project, titled Al ‘Otro Lado’ del Sueño / The Other Side of the American Dream is a harrowing reminder of the many hardships people face while chasing what seems like an impossible goal. This series focuses on men, women traveling alone, the elderly, and children, all of whom come from Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua and are attempting to get to ‘the other side’ – across the American border. The extent of these hardships are often underestimated: not only is there exploitation, discrimination and abuse from migration authorities, but also from gangs (Maras Salvatruchas) connected with smuggling and protection fees. Frioli says:

The intention of this project is clear: to gather documents and testimonies of the complaints and all of the abuses the migrants suffer; to be more knowledgeable about the abuse and corruption that the Mexican border authorities direct against Central American migrants; and to use pictures – painful and touching images – to reveal the physical scars, the pain, and the humiliation of those who at one point allowed themselves to dream of something better. (Source)

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E1000’s Geometric Abstraction Graffiti

When you think of graffiti geometric abstraction isn’t the style that comes to mind but E1000 has managed to mix graffiti and the long and rich history of geometric abstraction on city streets. Filled with rich warm hues that gradate from dark to light E1000 is bringing minimalism and geometry into the most unexpected places.

Ali Bailey

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Chicago youngster Ali Bailey comes correct  (again) with his second major Midwest exhibition, It’s The Real Thing @ Andrew Rafacz Gallery.  Live the American dream after the jump!

Franz Szony- Photographic Painter

Described as a “photographic painter” or “character portraitist”, Franz Szony transcends traditional photography in order to open windows into a lush, seductive, and intricately detailed world of fantasy and dreams where his seductive imagery fuses the classical with the modern, and depicts baroque aesthetics with a bizarre twist.

Szony’s work explores the intention and meaning behind beauty, evoking a mythical, archetypical atmosphere that has the potential to summon a meditative, imaginative, and even transcendental state of mind. Many of the photographs find their direct inspiration from Szony’s dreams, which he keeps meticulously logged in a dream diary. “The worlds and characters I’ve dreamt have inspired both minute details, as well as entire works of art, both aesthetically and emotionally. ”

Franz explains that, while most people consider themselves unconscious while sleeping, many philosophies teach that we are, in fact, more conscious while asleep than while awake… “If so, I can’t help but think our dreams to be more real and truthful than the physical world.”

See Szony’s solo show at Project One in San Francisco from July 11th-August 4th, 2012.

Emily Burns’ Pin-up Ladies and Taxidermy

Paintings and drawings by Emily Burns.

“My recent work references a variety of artistic techniques and influences from traditional oil painting and modern digital photography to the iconography of ancient Egypt , the American pin-up and nineteenth-century taxidermy. In this group of work, I seek to chronicle the relationship between the genesis of female icon objectification and its historical development. These works describe the psychological juxtaposition between the inherent urge to exploit one’s own short-lived youth and the pressures of adhering to social expectation. I explore the push and pull of these two concepts, asking how they have affected the female psyche and as well as how society has actively created its own vision of the idealized female.

My source material includes a range of visual elements, attempting to portray diverse visualized vernaculars, both past and present, into single compositions. My centralizing of the female figure illustrates the tensions and conflicts between the power of their beauty and strength of their character, as well as their inevitable vulnerability. Historically, artists have exploited the tradition of realistic oil portraiture not only to create a likeness, but also to embody the essential character of the subject. My paintings reconcile traditional portraiture with the more modern idea of an active subject, depicted not solely based upon her social status, but immortalized for her beauty and appeal. Similarly, the inclusion of taxidermied trophy animal heads alludes to the vulnerability of a creature that is prized for its beauty, complicating the notion of power attributed to the anthropomorphized deities of the ancient Egyptians. Finally, the figures are foregrounded against fragmented views of digital interruption and pixilation, serving to remind one of how computerized communication has profoundly affected how we reimagine the female form.”

Ana Strumpf Redesigns Fashion Magazine Covers By Adding Eye-Popping Colors And Patterns

Ana Strumpf - Mixed MediaAna Strumpf - Mixed Media

Artist Ana Strumpf uses creative color schemes and patterns to redesign fashion magazine covers. In her series Recover, trend-setting magazine like Vogue and Vanity Fair are transformed into whimsical worlds with eye-popping patterns complete with quirky make-up added on to the models. Striking, beautiful women posing for the camera are given pink hair, rosy cheeks, and green eye shadow, turning them into silly, fun characters. The primary colors and simple shapes are reminiscent of childhood and dress up games. Although her clashing patterns and neon colors at first may remind you of doodles, they all somehow look amazing. The interesting color palettes Strumpf chooses to add work beautifully in their own unique way.

Strumpf is a jack of all trades in the arts, as she designs and fabricates chairs, couches, lamps, and pillows on top of being an interior designer. Based out of New York, the artist studied fashion design at the Fashion Institute of Technology, which accounts for her love of high fashion magazines! Her cover redesigns are funky enough to be album covers, with the models now radiating lines and shapes along with the occasional third eye. Her wild stripes and spots form fresh new designs that really look like they belong on the cover of a magazine, like they are the next big trend in fashion. (via Honestly WTF)

Christopher Schreck

Schreck_1 Christopher  Schreck‘s photos have such a cool feel they almost seem as if you were dreaming when you see them. I don’t know if i’m dreaming or not now!