Get Social:

Book 4 Sneak Peek: Exclusive Print Insert


To get you excited about the release of Book 4, we’re giving you a sneak peak at the one of a kind hand-silkscreened original print that will be included in the issue. Friends and design studio Two Rabbits have been slaving away on a unique Exquisite Corpse themed mini-poster, featuring a collaboration between their artists.

And, if that’s not enough, subscribers will receive a premium, limited edition, multi-color edition that can’t be bought in any stores. So be sure to subscribe today to insure you get this special print!

Picture 3

Advertise here !!!

Brian Blomerth

blomerth dyptich

I met Brian Blomerth a few years ago, he is an interesting guy who makes art about Pomeranian dogs and Alysssa Milano.  He combines those two themes with acid colors, mysticism, and snazzy design.  He also lived in a (now closed) building called The Church of Crystal Light, and was from what I saw he inspired that group of people.  They were Richmond Virginia’s version of Fort Thunder.

Advertise here !!!

Joel Shapiro’s Gravity Defying Installation





Interested in the floor, the wall, their flatness and the way his sculptures engage with both of them, artist Joel Shapiro’s installations and sculptures are dynamic and engaging.   Suspending sculptures at various points and angles throughout a space, Shapiro seeks to create a sense of movement that depends on the forms and their relationships to one another.  Though not site-specific, his installations are in direct dialogue with architecture.  Shapiro is compelled by what he refers to as that “capricious” moment where forms come together to become something else.

Born in Sunnyside, Queens to a physician and microbiologist Shapiro tried to follow his parents into science, but realized that he had to become an artist.  Of the need to make art he says, “You have to have some real drive and deep belief, a combination of ego and humility, so it’s difficult. You have to have some sense of self and have to have some doubting sense of self in order to externalize your interior, so it’s a peculiar combination of factors, at least in my case, that you sort of, in retrospect, allow. I’m always surprised that the work looks good!”

The extreme structural and architectural nature of Shapiro’s work, however, perhaps begs at that scientific inclination.  There is a precision to his abstraction that is challenging in the way it defies gravity and logic.  Catch his show currently up at LA Louver through January 14th.

Neil Krug’s Vintage Sex

I just recently discovered Neil Krug‘s website but I’ve been seeing his work all over the place for years. Neil’s photos and videos combine a perfect mix of vintage, psychedelic, and sex.  If I ever start a band this guys getting a phone call.

Kevin Christy’s Allegorical Paintings

Kevin Christy lives and works in Los Angeles. He utilizes unyielding iconography to present allegories about the world we inhabit. Christy seems to have a firm grasp on popular culture and historical events and uses it to mock and enlighten. From a strikingly humorous depiction of Adolf Hitler slipping on a banana peel to an extended tee shirt adorned with the American Flag Christy channels the present and the past in his satirical depictions.

Court Side Glam: Victor Solomon Recreates Basketball Backboards With Stained Glass

Victor Solomon - stained glass backboard Victor Solomon - stained glass backboard Victor Solomon - stained glass backboardVictor Solomon - stained glass backboard

It is common knowledge that superstar athletes are paid handsomely. But artist Victor Solomon reminds us of that fact in a beautifully colorful and decorative way. He spent over 100 hours hand making stained glass window-style backboards for the basketball court. He makes the connection between the luxury life a lot of professional athletes live, and the historical opulence that once existed in homes and interior design.

After designing the backboards in a traditional ‘Tiffany‘ style, he cut the glass, soldered the frame together, strung together different style nets to suit each design, and even gold plated the rims. He has weaved jewels, gems and chains together, attaching them to the Art Nouveau style designs. Literally Balling is his collection of three different backboards, and what started out as a joke between friends, quickly turned into a labor intensive project centered around luxury and grandeur.

The thought of someone haphazardly throwing a basketball at one of these intricate and fragile creations is quite an unsettling one. Solomon cleverly points out that the attachment to, and respect we have for beautifully handcrafted objects, is also the same we have toward celebrity sports stars and professional sports. We can look, but it’s probably better not to touch. (Via Design Boom)

Sufi Influenced Cosmic Collages Explore Existence And Identity

Ala Ebtekar collage9 Ala Ebtekar collage7

Ala Ebtekar sufi collage2

The art of Ala Ebtekar is as simple as it is effective.  Ebtekar was born in the United States and raised in California but retained a strong connection to the land of his heritage, Iran.  You can nearly see in Ebtekar’s work a gazing at home from far away, a sort of portal.  Ebtekar is definitely referencing the cosmic with this work.  He says of the Sufi influence behind his work, “Sufis believe that existence is of two natures – both earthly and divine – and it’s that transition between these two states that’s represented by an arch. The arch could be in architecture, but it could also be a beloved’s eyebrow, and how that’s an entrance to that other space.”  Ebtekar also subtly uses Western imagery in addressing this “other space” – you’ll notice some of these pieces printed on the back of science fiction movie posters.

Carl D’Alvia

Carl D’Alvia’s furry and fuzzy sculptures made out of resin, ceramic, and bronze draw inspiration from megalithic monuments, toy design and the Baroque,  to create  work that is minimal in form but has a tongue and cheek humor to them that I find refreshing.