Get Social:

Faig Ahmed Reimagines Traditional Azerbaijani Carpets

Faig Ahmed Faig Ahmed Faig Ahmed

With a serious understanding of classic carpet-making techniques, Azerbaijani sculptor Faig Ahmed is able to stretch, distort and reinvent an iconic symbol steeped in tradition and cultural significance. “The carpet is a symbol of invincible tradition of the East, it’s a visualization of an undestroyable icon,” Ahmed states, noting that the manipulation of the woven medium gives visual form to ideas he has relating to “destroying the stereotypes of tradition to create new modern boundaries.” The rug, as a medium, works well for Ahmed, helping to deploy a deeper message about the stretching, bending and restructuring of physical and political boundaries in the Middle East. His technical mastery is evident in the movements of each thread, and his generous use of color gives the work an overall vibrancy—perhaps hinting at the artist’s sense of optimism in a time of great uncertainty and turmoil.

Advertise here !!!

Women From Iconic Paintings Replaced With Webcam Girls

omorejiecollage12 omorejiecollage2 omorejiecollage6 omorejiecollage17

Camgirlsproject was created by former fashion student Vanessa Omoregie who began the ongoing series about a year ago. The project seeks to investigate the female image within the context of the internet by presenting images of classic paintings that feature webcam selfies in the place of the painted nude female form. All images are user-submitted and present the viewer with a reappropriation or reclamation of female nudity as something to be celebrated and not shamed for.

The term – camgirl – originally applied to anyone who recorded themselves via webcam doing anything, not just sexual acts, but has been more currently associated most strongly with sexual behavior. Omoregie says, “The name has connotations of its own.The project hopefully makes people rethink what they know about the term and how they view girls who choose to be in front of a camera -sexual or not.”

Something you may notice about the submissions is that these modern-day nudes overwhelmingly represent lean, white, hairless bodies, almost a complete reflection of the bodies in the classic paintings. As a black woman, Omoregie is disappointed that more women of color and varying body types have not submitted to the project, although she has herself participated and tries to encourage more women to submit. Her hope was that women who are not typically represented by the media would feel more comfortable presenting their bodies in this sort of space, but so far, submissions of more variance have been few and far between.

While not currently taking submissions, Omoregie will be inviting followers to contribute to future projects of hers through this project’s site. She has also suggested that people follow her personal blog in order to keep up with forthcoming projects. (via telegraph and animal)

Advertise here !!!

Till Gerhard

Hamburg Germany based painter Till Gerhard’s images are psychedelic narratives with dark undertones filled with unsettling atmospheres.

“The scenes he chooses to memorialize—dimly felt moments from that tumultuous decade in 20th Century American history when counter-culture briefly flourished—are rendered with a discreet maleficence that belies their offbeat humor and whimsical color-scatterings. Thus, an otherwise banal preoccupation with “hippy bullshit” is transformed into effectual social commentary.”- David Marcus

“Gluten Free Museum” Imagines Art History Without The Grain

gluten-free-3 gluten-free-8gluten-free-1 gluten-free-4

For many people, eating gluten-free is a way of life. But, what happens when you not only remove wheat products from your diet, but from art history, too? The amusing Tumblr called Gluten Free Museum shows us just what that’d look like. It strips the offending protein from paintings, advertisements, and Chief Wiggum’s hands.

There’s a “before” and “after” element to each Gluten Free Museum post. The before, of course, is the original artwork, and the after is it sans grain. You don’t necessarily realize how integral gluten is in artistic compositions throughout history. Suddenly, though, things look bare. There’s no bread on the table, and the peasants are just picking at the ground without purpose. It demonstrates just how large of a role gluten plays in the art world, and sometimes, it’s at the center of it.

Spooky Portraits Capture Death And Ecstasy

silvia-4silvia-335

Through careful manipulation, Silvia Grav‘s ethereal black and white images capture a psychological realm where death and fear lurk around each corner, a world beyond the material where rich blacks and blinding white tones evoke a heightened anxiety and ecstasy. In her spooky portraits, the self is blurred by smoke and transparency, as if transported from the page by some unknowable force.

As with the works of the prolific photographer Francesca Woodman, Grav’s images are often set against the backdrop of the domestic space. The house, associated symbolically with the female, is no longer seen as safe or comforting; deteriorated walls and filthy floors cannot protect or contain inhabitants, and a woman rises ghostly towards a lit window. In another eerie image, the sleeping female is disturbed in sleep, her delicate floral bedding overcast by a foreboding shadow whose presence forces her to cover her breast and frightfully clasp at her back. Later, she is shown to be levitating, reaching out for the comforts of her mattress.

Within the terror of the images lies a sort of ecstasy, a dreamy surrender to instability and fright. The woman subject, surrounded by smoke clouds that seem to melt away her flesh, clasps her skeleton hands in rapturous prayer. Her nighttime slumber is seen in mysterious light, and she basks in its warmth, seeming to wriggle with delirium so that the majority of her body is pulled out of the frame.

The impressive work seems to invoke the memory of troubled women artists who came before. In one poignant image, the artist seems to mirror the famous profile portrait of Virginia Woolf by the photographer George Charles Beresford, down to the dark, pulled-back hair, the white blouse, and the ominous shadow below the eye. Contributing to the dialogue on femininity and mortality began by the likes of Woodman and Woolf, Grav adds a unique and potent modern voice. (via Colossal)

Marcus Oakley

Marcus Oakley

Here at B/D we love funny lighthearted drawings! There’s nothing like seeing a colorful little critter give you a quizzical look to start your day off with a smile. Well friends, if you agree, then you will love the work of London based illustrator Marcus Oakley. His mischievously whimsical creations start with a vibrant palette, and always seem to have furry little creatures running around acting like humans. What’s not to like about that?

Kerry Miller Dissects Old Book Illustrations To create Incredible 3D Collages

kerry Miller

kerry Millerkerry Miller

After exploring ways in which she can make use of old, discarded books, British artist Kerry Miller experimented with dissecting and rebuilding them to produce unique artworks. Layering to create a 3D effect, She utilises only the illustrations and the shell of the book, while removing the written word.

These carved 3D books provide tantalising glimpses into a rich past, becoming miniature worlds that allow you to simply tumble into them. As technology threatens to replace the printed word, there has never been a better time to reimagine the book. (via)

Chris Appelhans

Character Design for Monster House: Jenny, DJ, and Chowder

Character Design for Monster House: Jenny, DJ, and Chowder

 

Chris Appelhans has done some awesome production and character design for films like Monster House, City of Ember, and Coraline. He exhibits a fabulous range, from the ultra-dark and disgustingly well-rendered to the innocent and simple–and oftentimes the two realms overlap. How his work always seems to retain a sense of hope is beyond me! 

 

Check out his Frank and Frank cartoons as well as his modern-day adaptation of Alice in Wonderland (pictures after the jump, of course!).