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Cups, Magazines And Tutus Are Swirling Around In Thomas Jackson’s Dreamlike Photographs

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There is no real connections between the center pieces of Thomas Jackson’s pictures and the landscapes in the background. We are seeing tutus, magazines, cups and streamers floating candidly in a scenery of virgin mountains, forests and beaches. The artist is offering a dreamlike visual of what can be perceived as the last moments on earth of these peculiar items.

Each image, part of the emergent behavior series, is an experimental coalition of items placed where they don’t seem to belong. This juxtaposition creates at first a feeling of well being; we foremost notice the swirl and the nature. After a deeper glance at what is really going on there’s a hesitation: are these everyday things really the focus of this beauty? The emphasis is made on industrial versus natural; reality versus imagination. Thomas Jackson’s purpose is to come up with a fresh interpretation of our daily routines. Calling for a distress, if we are brave enough to face it, of what is really going on in our ecosystem.

There has been quite a few inquisition about how the pictures where taken. They were in fact photoshopped and kept as realistic as their originals. Thomas Jackson confesses that he photographed the whole thing and then only removed the prop using photoshop: On the spectrum between “retouched image” and “real time image”, I’ve strived to make it closer to the latter”.
When a picture can create such a flow of different kind of emotions, there’s no need to question the retouching. What the artist has created is a hazy fantasy that we wish could appear in real life.

Thomas Jackson’s work will be shown at the Miller Yezerski Gallery in Boston as part of a group exhibition, until August 14th 2015.
Photos courtesy of Thomas Jackson

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Dismantling Stereotypes of Beauty and femininity


The relationships of women to themselves and their environment fuel the narratives of Jennifer Nehrbass’ paintings and are formed from the binary oppositions between the images. By dismantling the roles and stereotypes of beauty and femininity Nehrbass examines the psychology that leads women to go to extremes to maintain beauty and style.

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Eduardo Kobra’s Street Art Inserts Nostalgic Imagery Into Contemporary Environments

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Take a stroll along the High Line in NYC and you can’t help but notice Chelsea’s very own eye-popping mural by Eduardo Kobra on 25th and 10th. This towering piece of street art infuses a rainbow bolt of color into Manhattan’s skyline, emoting nostalgic imagery: re-imagining Alfred Eisenstaedt’s 1945 classic photograph “VJ Day in Times Square.” Likewise, if you live along the west coast in LA, you might have noticed Kobra’s psychedelic Mt. Rushmore redeux at 1255 La Brea Ave, exposing the art of democracy.

Interestingly, this artist is not from America, but São Paulo, where his passion for blending vintage or classic iconic imagery into contemporary settings first emerged in the late 1980s and has traveled internationally ever since. The intention was and is to pay homage to the parts of a country’s past or remind the city inhabitants of their historical precedents–  emphasizing a certain level of romanticism.

Last Day To Save 50% On The Beautiful/Decay Shop!


You only have one more day to add creativity and inspiration to your home while you save your hard earned cash.  Now you can get 50% off all books, magazines, and artist shirts and get inspired by the thousands of artists and designers that we feature in our pages. Just use discount code “happyholidays50” during checkout and save big! Sale ends January 10th at midnight PST!

Sonya Derman

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Sonya Derman is an artist and illustrator making her way in San Francisco. Her brush is unwavering and filled with anointed colors that cue the subject matter to an extremely beautiful place. Working with a very specific tone, Sonya’s work eschews the natural for a slight tilt; and it looks terrific.

She also recently produced a ‘zine that is available for only $4.

Artist Herbert Baglione Paints Eerie Shadows On The Walls Of An Abandoned Psychiatric Hospital

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Since 1999, Brazilian artist Herbert Baglione has been populating the cracked walls and floors of forgotten places with shadowy, painted specters, which are characterized by their elongated limbs and emaciated, sinuous bodies. As the years have passed, his ghostly installations have emerged in dark corners all over the world, including Brazil, Germany, and France. In July 2013, Baglione found what might be his most eerie location to date: an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Parma, Italy. Down the building’s moldering, littered corridors, the artist’s ghosts aimlessly trail their wispy bodies up the walls and through open doors. At this time, the ongoing project was officially named 1000 Shadows. Describing his creative approach to forgotten places and their inhabiting spirits, Baglione has explained that “The ‘reading’ of these places allows [him] to take the shadow to a unique path, which usually feeds and broadens the discussion because it brings light to the abandoned environment […]. It is as if the soul is leaving an invisible trail on these places” (Source).

What makes Baglione’s work so simultaneously fascinating and unsettling for the psyche is that it plays with the dichotomy of presence and absence — two states of being that we often assume are fundamentally separate. By creating these shadows, not only has Baglione left his physical “mark” (his presence) for passersby to ponder (who was here? And what does it mean?), but he reminds us that other people were there long before us, and perhaps their energy still remains, making absence a form of presence. We feel drawn to these sad specters, and perhaps a bit frightened; they are traces of a persisting darkness that inspire us, emotionally and imaginatively, to close the gap in time. The wheelchair deserted in the hallway with its accompanying ghost is a particularly visceral referent for this troubling of past and present life.

Visit Baglione’s blog, Facebook page, and Instagram and follow him as he continues to occupy our imaginations and the world’s forgotten places with his signature shadows. (Via Bored Panda)

We Never Discount Subscriptions…UNTIL NOW!


As you know we have never put our subscriptions on sale before. We count on every dollar that we make from subscription sales to keep Beautiful/Decay going as ALL our revenue comes from book sales. Our profits slim down when we discount an already discounted product (regular subscription price is already 33% off the cover price) so we need as many of you as possible to subscribe to make up for the loss in volume. The response so far has been great, with many of you putting your money where your mouth is and securing Beautiful/Decay’s future. So please spread the word about our biannual subscription sale and buy a subscription for a friend or two. You won’t get these prices for a minimum of another 6 months and you’ll help us share the work of millions of talented artists with the world.

Use discount code Discountdecaysub and get a one year subscription for only $34.00! This deal will only be good for one week and will expire on February 23rd.


Video Watch: Bill Fick Interview and Printmaking Process Footage


As part of a summer workshop at Duke University’s Center For Documentary Studies, Frith Gowan and Ayanna Seals created a short film about printmaker Bill Fick. The video cuts back and forth between an interview with Fick and footage of the artist’s lino cut process. It’s always great to get a glimpse into a talented artist’s process, but the interview is really insightful as well. Fick, who features monsters and skulls pretty heavily within his work, speaks about what his subject matter might indicate about his personality, his interests, and his response to the world. He never takes himself too seriously though, which is nice to see. Watch the video after the jump. (via)