Get Social:

Marius Budu Creates Structures, Patterns And Motifs Using Naked Bodies

Marius Budu - Photography 8_565x565 Marius Budu - Photography 7_565x377 Marius Budu - Photography 1_565x377 Marius Budu - Photography 4_565x377

Female naked bodies displayed on a black monochromatic background. Photographer Marius Budu uses nudity to express the human condition. Based in Copenhagen, Denmark he has been working with nude subjects since 2006.

The women’s bodies are perfectly aligned and arranged. Forming shapes where the bodies can no longer be discerned individually. The overall images depict an architectural element rather than a gathering of women. Even though they are naked, there’s no ambiguous feeling upon looking at the photographs. Marius Budu plays with the light and shade; accentuating the different tones of the flesh. The models attitude is strong and focused, creating a powerful configuration.

The message is simple and efficient: to unveil the limitless potential of the human body. In the ‘Flesh Structures’ series, Marius Budu uses the bodies of women to tell us a story, to communicate his vision. Using the most basic mean in its original form, he translates his fascination for the human body into intense visual sculptures, inviting the viewer to “wonder or simply absorb”.

Advertise here !!!

Ray Bartkus’ Clever Waterfront Mural Comes To Life Only When Viewed In Its Reflection

mirror1 mirror2 mirror3 mirror4

Lithuanian artist Ray Bartkus has recently painted an intricate mural on the sides of a building near water in the Lithuanian town of Marijampolé, depicting swimmers, dolphins, and other aquatic scenes. Upon first glance, it merely looks like upside down street art. However, this mural has one very particular characteristic: it is painted upside down, in such a way that it must be reflected into the water in order to be complete.

The reflected version of the mural makes it seem like the water is full of swans, boats and people swimming. He has managed to create a clever combination of art and nature, by painting his art upside down; he has made it dependent on the reflection of the water in order for it to reach its full potential. Once the mural is projected into the water, it becomes a whole new work of art.

On top of the originality of this idea is the execution itself. The precision with which Bartkus has painted his landscape is amazing. He gets up close to the wall to paint all the lines, dots, and shapes necessary to achieve perfect symmetry in his mural’s reflection. He has managed to paint everything upside down and by doing so, he has a created a mural that goes both towards the sky and into the water.



Advertise here !!!

Food Art, Part 2

Fulvio Bonavia, "Untitled", A Matter of Taste, 2008

Fulvio Bonavia, "Untitled", A Matter of Taste, 2008

As I mentioned last week, I thought it’d be interesting to round up a collection of artists who make art out of the surprising medium of food. Read on to find out today’s round up!

David Shaw at Feature Inc.

David Shaw, one of the featured geniuses in issue Z, is opening his solo exhibition on april 30th  in the Bowery. its the second of three exhibitions Feature inc. has curated on the theme “psycholoptical”.

Peter Buchanan-Smith


Peter Buchanan-Smith is a New York-based graphic designer whose clients include Isaac MIzrahi, Paper Magazine, Brian Eno & David Byrne, and more. I particularly enjoy his clever book covers. He also inexplicably runs a company called Best Made Co. which exclusively produces $300 painted axes.

Gil Batle Carves 20 Years Of Prison Life Onto Delicate Ostrich Eggs

Gil Batle - Carving Gil Batle - CarvingGil Batle - Carving Gil Batle - Carving

Gil Batle is an American artist who spent over 20 years in Californian prisons for fraud and forgery. He endured some of the state’s most infamous facilities, including San Quentin, Chuckawalla, and Jamestown, living in racially segregated conditions under the constant threat of gang violence. During that time, Gil’s astounding ability to draw and tattoo with extreme precision gave him an esteemed reputation among the inmates, thus protecting him from harm and intimidation.

In an exhibition titled “Hatched in Prison,” which will be featured at the Ricco/Maresca gallery in New York from November 5th–January 9th, 2016, Batle presents viewers with a fascinating, sensitive, and detailed glimpse into the hardship and abuse endured in prison by carving these experiences onto the surfaces of ostrich eggs. Brutal images of isolation, beatings from security guards, and chain gangs cover the delicate, ivory-colored surfaces. Barbed wire, gang symbols, and shivs create an ominous symmetry.

In this unique medium, Batle reveals scenes that are usually hidden away from the public eye. There is a special significance to carving trauma onto an egg—an object which Ricco/Maresca’s press release describes as “nature’s most perfect creation and manifestation of life and birth” (Source); Batle’s creations seem to convey vulnerability as well as a sense of hope, renewal, and redemption.

Visit Ricco/Maresca to learn more.

Awesome Video Of The Day: Vanishing Point


Fun video full of morphing geometry. By Japanese designer Takuya Hosogane for Bonsajo.

Wyatt W.’s Death in Rainbows

The idea of finding and re-sharing images on the internet is nothing new, but sometimes someone does it well enough it’s worth talking about. Canadian artist Wyatt W.’sDeath In Rainbows tumblr is not the usual loosely connected (or completely random) mess, it is broken down into meticulously curated sets of fascinating images. This care and direction create an experience that is both focused and full of surprises.