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The Sensual World

"The Sensual Presidents of the United States (1984)" by Eric Timothy Carlson. He took a presidential calendar and replaced all their faces with roses.

Here are some pictures that I took from the Synch Space opening two Saturdays ago to cobble together a follow up post albeit, ahem, very tardy (the show closed this past Saturday). It was really hilarious and awesome to see so many different interpretations of Kate Bush’s image and persona. Though, to tell you the truth, I don’t know too much about her and read up only about her the day before the opening (yikes!). I hope you won’t judge me on that admission tooo much.

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Kar­ley Feaver’s Stuffed Birds With Bizarre Haircuts





New Zealand-based artist Kar­ley Feaver creates assemblages that involve a mix­ture of stuffed birds and various costume-like adornment ( human hair, gold plated metal, wood, and more). The artist claims that the animals she uses are ethically sourced and have died of natural causes.

Through her grotesque yet beautiful sculptures, the artist explores the idea of trans­for­ma­tion and adorn­ment, as her cur­rent inter­ests rest in nature’s abil­ity to sur­vive in dif­fer­ent forms by adapt­ing, adjust­ing, and mutat­ing into an increas­ingly man-made environment.

She intends to make these birds look other-worldly. Interestingly enough, she is successful at doing this by using materials that we are very familiar with (human hair, gold, and wood). She makes an interesting juxtaposition between the natural and the unnatural, the familiar and the unfamiliar- specifically to make a point about the unnatural efforts animals (in general) have to make in order to survive in a man-made environment.

Through the ages peo­ple have made beau­ti­ful things for them­selves and oth­ers by using mate­ri­als from their nearby envi­ron­ment. Birds are known to do the same, espe­cially when seek­ing to attract a mate. Feaver’s new works bring the image of beauty almost to the edge of absur­dity, their appear­ance is both bizarre and extra­or­di­nary, unlike any other crea­ture on earth.

(via Brown Paper Bag)

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Tara Donovan Transforms Index Cards And Plastic Rods Into Incredible Organic Sculptures


Untitled, 2014. Acrylic and adhesive.


Untitled, 2014. Styrene index cards, metal, wood, paint and glue


(detail) Untitled, 2014. Styrene index cards, metal, wood, paint and glue

Tara Donovan (previously featured here) has famously used inorganic materials to emulate organic shapes, resembling hives, mountains and other natural configurations. Her most recent exhibition, Tara Donovan, at Pace Gallery’s Chelsea, New York, expands on the artist’s use of inventive materials, including index cards, a first for Donovan. Featuring two large-scale works, “the artist continues to explore the phenomenological effect of work created through the accumulation of identical objects” 

The former Macarthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Grant recipient is known for her commitment to process, inventive materials, and evocative installations.  Says Donovan,

“There is a sense I get of wanting to choreograph someone’s experience of my work, because the surfaces of my work do often shift and follow the perspective of the viewer, there is a perceptual movement that coincides with a person’s physical movement within the gallery space.’”

(via from89 and designboom)


Party Food is a project Joseph Gillette started in 2006. It incorporates a collage filled landscape of video, performance, sculpture, drawing, music- framed in an all encompassing Sesame-Street-on-Crack-ness. He has written, produced and performed three chapters so far, and is currently writing the fourth with the hopes of showing in LA some time this summer. This video in particular creeps me out and makes me laugh at the same time, which is great! It kind of reminds me of the uncanny valley– between a totally impossible and and familiar object.

Adeline Mai Explores Profound Intimacy Inn Her Breathtaking Nudes

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Like looking into the private thoughts of a diary, photographer Adeline Mai creates narratives of intimacy, portraying poetic scenes of human interaction.  In her body of work, she creates ethereal images of profound closeness between her subjects.  With titles like J’ai Embrassé L’Aube D’Été, French for I Embraced the Summer Dawn, Weightlessness, and Dirty Weekend, the names of each series are just as lyrical as the photographs itself. The Parisian artist captures stunning images of contorting bodies, displaying breathtaking views of the human body. In her series I Embraced the Summer Dawn, each photograph contains a stark emptiness except for the two, nude figures beautifully entwined as if they are attempting to become one body. This same sense of intimacy is embodied in her series Dirty Weekend. Only instead of gracefully posed, flawless bodies, we are now given a view of a more natural nudity, out in the woods and in more candid positions. Mai not only captures a playful kind of nakedness, but a shared closeness between clothed subjects as well.  She is a master at capturing tender moments between her subjects and laying them out for all to see.

Mai having the ability to brilliantly capture light on her subjects, her series Weightlessness includes floating figures with soft, warm light consuming their surroundings. These figures appear to be floating, but they are actually underwater! The photographer has turned this normally cool-colored environment into a glow of yellows, reds, and oranges. Adeline Mai’s entrancing photography pulls you in to its intimate scenes of magnificent nudes being swallowed up by a sea of color or by human embrace.

Evan Holm Plays Records On A Turntable Submerged Underwater

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California based artist Evan Holm, creates Submerged Turntables, a kinetic installation featuring salvaged objects, turntables, records, and dark, murky water. The piece, which Holm used to perform at San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art but now resides in his studio in Oakland, is meant to serve as a reminder that “all tracings of human culture will dissolve back into the soil under the slow crush of the unfolding universe.” By playing the records in the piece’s pitch-black pool, Holm is “enacting a small moment of remorse towards this loss.”

For this work, Evan submerged a working turntable in a dark liquid; he then proceeds to pick a record from his wall, which then is inserted onto the wet record player. The functioning underwater turntable is a mystery, and I think that that’s the most enticing part of the work; the turntable’s ability (against all odds) to play music under water, it is quite remarkable.

The work, heavy on symbolism, relies on our negative notions of pairings involving electricity and water (a parallel to doomed feelings). How can we ever think that an electric turntable could effectively work under water? It is this notion that brings Holm’s concept to a clearer view. By making this possible, he brings forth an “optimistic sculpture, for that just after the moment of submergence..the tone, the melody is pulled back out of the pool, past the veil of the subconscious, out from under the crush of time, and back into a living and breathing realm.” (via IGNANT)



Scanner Glitch Photography from Federico Ferrari

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The intentional glitchiness of the photography of Federico Ferrari is at once familiar and surprising.  This series appears to be still life photography interrupted by a scanner malfunction.  A section of each image is dragged across the plane reducing it to simple lines of color.  Small pieces of photographs are severely exaggerated in size.  It abstracts otherwise benign photographs and plays with the viewer’s perception of a simple scene scene.

angela bacon kidwell’s Waking Dream

Angela Bacon Kidwell’s photographs come from her long obsession of exploring how her subconscious generates dreams. She uses a variety of props and constructed sets  to create images of what a waking dream might look like.