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Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 1

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 12

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 3

Meshuna Gallery - Street Art 2

Oren Fischer and Anton Avramov are the owners of the Meshuna Gallery in Tel Aviv. First thought as a studio space for both artists, they decided to dedicate one of the rooms to exhibit new artists; mainly street artists. Located in the Florentin area, surrounded by graffiti walls, Meshuna Gallery welcomed this past Saturday Prettimess, a small art collective to present the STICKERZ! exhibition. 

31 artists were invited to design all sorts of stickers. Some of them were available to buy on site, some were displayed on road signs all over the gallery, others were printed in a large version and sold as a set in collaboration with DaSilva skateboards. The rest of the stickers were sold in small packages at affordable prices (5 US$).

The idea behind the stickers is to promote “culture for the people”. An immediate, effective and fun medium to spread the artist message directly to the mass. By making exhibitions, parties and alternative events the young Israeli collective behind this event reveals young and talented culture activists (all linked to alternative sport, urban art and music scene).

So why the rise of street art in Tel Aviv? According to Nneya Richards from PaperMag the graffitis in the city are seen as a pure way to express ideas and are not always fined.
“It’s no secret that some of the best art comes out of social turmoil and, in recent years, nothing is a better reflection of this than the burgeoning street art scene in Tel Aviv”

You can check out both Meshuna Gallery and Prettimess Art Collective on their Facebook Page as well as on Instagram 

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Zadok Ben-David’s Hand-Painted Metal Meadows

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The installations of London-based artist Zadok Ben-David‘s miniscule metal flowers are detailed, dense and mesmerizing. His travelling series of the work (called Blackfield) appeared in London, Portugal, Sydney, Singapore, Berlin, Linz, Untergroningen, Seoul, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Derived from illustrations appearing in 19th century Victorian encyclopedias, each iteration contains nearly 20,000 delicate 3-D floral etchings.

Each individual flower is crafted from metal and each side is hand-painted with either a stunning meltdown of color—or a heavy coat of black. Hovering between breathtaking and completely disturbing, the flat, sketch-like sculptures seem ominous as they stand in perfect rows, tucked into a massive bed of white sand.

Video Watch: I Am Dain- Senior Citizen Street Artist Is Still At It

Brooklynite Gallery has been on some sort of weird hiatus for a while, apparently to focus on making arts related films. Well, they do make good shorts. This is one from a while back when they had an exhibition from collage artist DAIN. So there’s this unassuming elderly guy, right? Well he happens to be a fairly prolific street artist who makes collage work out of portrait photography. Just watch the video. And the next time you find yourself in a discussion lamenting what “Street Art” has become, remember DAIN, who pastes work on the street because it’s as natural to him as breathing. To him, it’s not about money or cool factor, this is just something that gives him a lot of satisfaction. Dude knows what it’s all about.

Enrico Ferrarini’s Takes Traditional Sculpture To Its Digital Conclusion

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Italian artist Enrico Ferrarini builds upon the famous art history of his country, quite literally,  in his unique style which takes traditional sculpture to its digital conclusion. By carving and casting sculptures and then creating multiples of them, Ferrrani combined them, bring a glitched, modernly repetitive styling to time-honored sculpting methods.

The Moderna, Italy-born artist has studied at the Florence Academy of Fine Arts (where some of the most famous sculptures of all time, including Donatello and Michelangelo’s Davids reside), and employs methods of sculpture which are not typically learned by today’s artists. Perhaps that is why his work has a deeper resonance; employing the methods of the past to work with the styling of today. (via myampgoesto11)

Awesome Video Of The Day: Dragonfly Love

This is probably the best short film I have ever seen using only a camera phone. Director Thomas Hilland was asked to make the most out of Nokia N8’s smartphone camera. If the quality of the film doesn’t do it for you, I know I especially enjoyed the rotund men running around in costumes, battling each other with remote controlled dragonflies. Music was by the British band, Kap Bambino.

Barry Underwood’s Light Art Installations

Barry Underwood’s images are documentations of full-scale installations that are built on-site in the landscape. Using illusion, imagination, and narrative, his photographs explore the potential of the ordinary. Approaching his photographs with a theatrical sensibility, much like a cinematographer or set designer would. By reading the landscape and altering the vista through lights and photographic effects, he transform everyday scenes into unique images. Light and color alter the perception of space, while defamiliarizing common objects. Space collapses, while the lights that he installs appear as intrusions and interventions. This combination renders the forms in the landscape abstract. Inspired by cinema, land art, and contemporary painting, the resulting photographs are both surreal and familiar. They suggest a larger narrative, and yet that narrative remains elusive and mystifying.