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Bill Connor’s Gross Out!

Chicago based illustrator Bill Connors creates gross loose drawings with plenty of leaky eyeballs, gross slime, and beautiful deformations.

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Chester Gould

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In late 1978, an exhibition of cartoonist Chester Gould‘s (d. 1985) art for his strip, Dick Tracy, was held at the Museum of Cartoon Art (now defunct) in Port Chester, NY. In the catalog published to coincide with the show, there is a massive appendix of 200 characters Gould created for the strip over the years. Now I’ve never read Dick Tracy as it was a bit before my time, but I had absolutely no idea it was so weird. The characters have bizarre appearances and names like Flattop, Nothing, and Vitamin Flintheart. Matt Masterson, the man who put the appendix together, says:

When I asked Chet Gould where he got the names for some of his characters, he told me he used to ride the train from his home in Woodstock, Illinois to his studio in Chicago and sketch various people he observed on the train. He would exaggerate upon certain features or characteristics. The name would follow, with he one exception being Flattop, whose name came from the popular aircraft carrier of World War II.

Some of my favorites are after the jump, but if you want to see the whole collection, click here.

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Yo Shimada’s Post-It Note Structures

Designer Yo Shimada of the firm Tato Architects built this structure in conjunction with students from the Kyoto University of Art and Design.  The entire wall is made of post-it notes – 30,000 cells of post-it notes.  The brightly colored sticky notes are stuck together to create individual cells which are then stacked.  The installation exemplifies both innovative design and architecture.  Using a simple material, Yo is able to create a relatively large and sturdy artful structure. [via]

Artist Applies Paint Solvents To Photographs To Create Eerie And Surreal Images

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There is little to be found on mixed media artist Kuinexs, who claims this name as an identity and artform. For his “Photodissolutions,” the artist applies paints solvents to photographs, creating a chemical reaction that smears and blurs the colors in the photograph. The effect is at once haunting and a bit disturbing. Some of the elements of the original photograph peek through or remain untouched backgrounds to the dissolutions, presenting a jarring juxtaposition of realism and surrealism. The subjects in Kuinexs’ images are often obscured, and only the curves of faces and bodies and flesh-tone colors exist as evidence of a subject’s presence. (via juxtapoz)

Atomic Bomb Tests Recreated in Fictional Photo Series

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing  Alison Zavos’ piece on photographer Clay Lipsky.

“I was raised during the height of the Cold War, when the threat of nuclear war loomed between two superpowers. The dramatized depictions in TV and film of such an apocalyptic demise both intrigued and scared me as a child. Yet the actual historical record of the atomic age was full of antiquated, black and white images that seemed dated and a world away.

This series, Atomic Overlook, recontextualizes a legacy of atomic tests in order to keep the reality of our post-atomic era fresh and omnipresent. It also speaks to the current state of the world and the voyeuristic culture we live in.

Imagine if the advent of the atomic era occurred during today’s information age. Tourists would gather to view bomb tests, at the “safe” distances used in the 1950’s, and share the resulting cell phone photos online. Broadcast media would regurgitate such visual fodder ad nauseum, bringing new levels of desensitization.

The threat of atomic weapons is as great as ever, but it is a hidden specter. Nuclear proliferation has gained even more obscurity through the “rogue” factions that can now possess them. Meanwhile America’s stockpile of weapons continues to be modernized and will probably never cease to exist. I can only hope that mankind will never again suffer the wrath of such a destructive force, but it is clear that the world would not hesitate to watch.”

Clay Lipsky is a fine art photographer & graphic designer based in Los Angeles. His photos have been exhibited in various group shows, including those at the Annenberg Space for Photography, MOPLA, Pink Art Fair Seoul, PhotoPlace and Impossible Project NYC.

Laurence Aëgerte Photographs Of People And Objects In Front Of Classic Paintings

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Laurence Aëgerte‘s conceptual photography series, “Hermitage, The Modernists” depicts staged people and objects in front of classic paintings – by  artists like Van Dongen, Kandinsky, Matisse, and Picasso – that were on view at the Hermitage Amsterdam during 2010. Aëgerte’s series complicates the expectation of the experience of iconic works by turning them into photographic palimpsests – the patterns, textures, and colors of the people and objects are juxtaposed against the paintings-as-backdrop that frame the foregrounded subject, elevating the layers of significance of the original painting.

Aëgerte says, “I wanted to investigate our individual relation to art and our perception of iconic artworks. The more the icon is alive in our mind—by means of reproductions and stories around it—the higher is the intensity of the expectation to be confronted with its reality. But what can we really experience of it? When our vision of a work of art is altered, it becomes a reversed mirror—anchored in our present time. By layering the images, I seek the in-between spaces and bits of time that occur in the process of looking.”

“Hermitage, The Modernists” is currently on view at the Hermitage Amsterdam until February 20. (via this isn’t happiness and whitehot magazine)

Cara DeAngelis Paints Roadkill in Satirical 17th Century Still Lifes

 

Cara DeAngelis paints found roadkill in “compositions that both pay homage to, and satirize 17th century Hunting Still Lifes”. “The still lifes and portraits of animals on aristocratic laps explore the long-standing confrontations between the domestic and the wild.” But DeAngelis’ black magic goes a little further than that. The artist, who takes care to incorporate the “Tragic and the Infantile” within her work, includes children’s toys and dolls in her compositions to create an “absurd union“- nostalgia vs. violent death, innocence vs. murder. These paintings are done in oil, which somehow seems appropriate for the heavy concept scale within DeAngelis’ work. Ms. DeAngelis received her MFA from the New York Academy of Art in 2011.