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Cheryl Archer’s Consumption Society

Cheryl Archer’s Consumption Society series take a close and personal look at what and how we consume food. These ultra detailed images of food being shoved, licked, and gently placed into hungry mouths makes me crave a burrito and wish I never had to eat again simultaneously.

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New Video by Sean Pecknold

A few months ago I had the pleasure of interviewing artist Sean Pecknold regarding his video work. He has a nostalgic, bittersweet charm to his works that evoke a feeling similar to discovering a sepia-toned portrait of your great grandparents and a dried rose from an undiscovered dusty cigar box in the attic. His animations often complement the music in strange ways, not creating direct narratives that “spell out” the lyrics of the song, but rather riff off the themes within the music in unexpected ways. He recently just completed a new video for Elvis Perkins in Dearland, a slowly sinking band presiding in a lit cave above a murky, watery world of ancient lion sculpture…haunting, beautiful and strange.

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Chris Maynard Crafts Magical Avian Worlds From Feathers

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Artist Chris Maynard creates tiny ethereal designs on feathers. His process begins by collecting feathers of birds (usually not of North America descent) from aviaries and zoos. He uses delicate, detail oriented tools such as eye surgery scissors, forceps, and magnifying glasses that have been passed down to him through his family. With these tools, he is able to achieve intimate levels of detail, crafting miniaturized fantastical avian worlds. His uses his work to transform the ordinary into something surreal and perhaps a bit magical. He explains that he would like the viewer

“to take away being able to look at the world in a different way…I want people to be able to take a breath and look at something a little differently, something that they know. Feathers are a universal symbol. Feathers for different people will mean different things, but generally, it means flight, it can mean escape, something we want to strive for, a bridge between here and the heavens. I want people to take their own message from it, but I think what comes out are some of those themes.”

The original integrity of the feathers is important to the artist. He does not manipulate the color or over arching shape with the aim to “honor the birds and the feathers.” Maynard, having a strong background in biology and ecology, has published a book titled Feathers: Form & Function. He uses his work not only to express artistic notions but also explains origin and function of his material. Each work is intricate, delicate, and whimsical.

Artist Lee Griggs Brings Internal Fears To The Surface In His Funhouse Mirror Portraits

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As if looking through a funhouse mirror where a likeness is seen in multiple forms, artist Lee Griggs creates funky portraits with the aid of 3d Scans. By distorting the face he achieves a physical illusion which plays on various fears and insecurities. Some of the faces are bloated into blockhead or more architectural shapes and through the aid of 3d Scans are manipulated into an aesthetic which bring out what someone might feel on the inside. It plays on different aspects of mood and personality which might be normally hidden and not seen. The physicality of the pieces find reference in masks but stay within strict perimeter of what is human and doesn’t divert into otherworldly fantasy. Instead it makes something fantastic out of the familiar and has a strong foothold in drawing.
Some of the specific pieces Griggs make look as if they’re about to burst from anxiety or stress. It metaphors sayings like “my head’s about to explode” and puts it in a literal sense. Some have called his drawings nightmarish which definitely holds true to some extent. There will be those who associate distortion with the unknown and therefore horror. Some actually look like the boulder-like creatures known as Gorons from the popular video game “Zelda”. When thought of in that context they lose a tiny bit of their scariness. (via thecreatorsproject)

Christoph Ruckhäberle’s Vintage Geometric Figures

Good buddy and painter extraordinaire Alison Blickle turned me onto the work of Christoph Ruckhäberle the other day and my mind was immediately blown.These paintings are completely bizarre and incredibly beautiful. Everything from the choice of color, the abstraction of the human body, and the strange vintage imagery sets it aside from work that you see on most gallery walls!

These Impressivly Spooky LEGO Sculptures Aren’t Meant For Kids

Gilcélio de Souza Chagas, Old Electric Chair

Gilcélio de Souza Chagas, Old Electric Chair

Jimmy Fortel, Scary Bear (~200 pieces)

Jimmy Fortel, Scary Bear (~200 pieces)

Dan Parker, Cavities (~1125 pieces)

Dan Parker, Cavities (~1125 pieces)

Mihai Marius Mihu, Heresy, from "The Nine Circles of Hell"

Mihai Marius Mihu, Heresy, from “The Nine Circles of Hell”

There’s a lot of impressive things built using LEGOs, and a lot of times the family-friendly toy stays PG in content. In Mike Doyle’s new book titled Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark, however, the dozens of creations are more sinister in nature. The publication includes a number of MOCs (a community acronym that means “My Own Creation”) that feature the likes of a scary bear, an electric chair, giant insects, and more. The artworks are an interesting and entertaining spin on LEGOs as they venture into adult territory. And, since we’d usually think of them as something that’s more lighthearted, it makes even more of a visual and conceptual impact. Beautiful LEGO 2: Dark comes out next month. But if you enjoy these unconventional builds and want to see more of the now, be sure to check out its predecessor, also by Doyle. It’s titled Beautiful LEGO. (Via Wired)

Ceramicist Lauren Gallaspy Creates Fantastical Sculptures Confronting Vulnerable Imbalance

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Artist Lauren Gallaspy creates unique and dynamic ceramic sculptures that play with notions of fantasy and duality. Her work, beautiful, adventurous, and full of a sense of wonder, invokes magical moments of nonsensical, yet somehow perfected, chaos. Her intention lies in finding balance in seemingly irrational binaries. She explains, “the things that I love and the things that I fear refuse to balance out. They scrap like cats, cloak and conceal like kudzu, terrify and delight, like a large, shaky lake or a dog swimming hard towards a floating ball.” The artist uses this tension to create creative and inventive ceramic sculptures, which are not only experimental by nature, but break boundaries of traditionalist methods of pottery. Experiencing Gallaspy’s work is like an investigation. Each color, each angle, each new treatment of material is expressive and fascinating. Her work screams out for a quiet attention, being open ended yet intimate. Her work emphasizes the complexity of humanity, the ups and downs of just simply being. She explains;

“My work is about that imbalance: the vulnerability of living things and the sometimes violent, sometimes pleasurable, almost always complex consequences that occur when bodies and objects in the world come into contact with one another. I use ornamentation, obsessive mark-making, and decorative imagery as a kind of devotional or transformational act, a way to render interior spaces and intense psychological experiences physically.”

 

Christopher Davison

"Tossin' And Turnin", Flashe, india ink, gouache on Rives BFK 15" x 20", 2009

"Tossin' And Turnin", Flashe, india ink, gouache on Rives BFK 15" x 20", 2009

Christopher Davison currently lives in Philadelphia, working as a freelance designer and part time professor for the Tyler School of Art.His influences in drawing come from a variety of sources including Medieval European Art, Indian Miniatures, and the etchings of Goya and George Grosz.