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The Eerily Dissolving Faces of Henrietta Harris

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New Zealand-based illustrator Henrietta Harris, previously featured here, continues to compel the eye with her alluring and dreamily distorted portraits. In her pastel-toned watercolors, she renders the human figure fluid and infinite. Seemingly caught in moments of a romantic introspection bordering on spiritual transcendence, her subjects dissolve into swirls, scribbles, and line.

Here, Harris’s artistic process is inextricably fused with the completed portrait, and the creative act of art making is just as significant as the subject itself. Quick, doodled lines of primary and secondary colors become equally as material and substantial as the multiple-toned and shaded flesh itself, and the artist’s stream of consciousness thrillingly interrupts any objective reflection of reality. Individual identities collapse to form a whirlpool of ecstatic color, and the body itself becomes a cosmic landscape, revolving, twisting, and floating like a strange fleshy galaxy.

The intense movement of Harris’s work is balanced only by her soft, muted colors and the hushed expressions of her subjects. Peering sleepily downwards, her watercolor muses exude a quiet yet concentrated aura, as if lost in a meditative trance. Two-dimensional lines like static electricity course through three-dimensional bodies, slicing their features in two, and still they stare forward resolutely. Deconstructed perhaps by their own imaginations, they surrender themselves to the hand of the artist, which leaps and coils whimsically across the page. Take a look. (via The Inspiration Grid)

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De Kwok

De Kwok

 

De Kwok, out of San Francisco (currently, anyway… having lived in both Los Angeles and Seattle), photographs both everyday scenes and ones we hope are staged. His subjects range from elderly asian couples to rabbit-people to friends- always managing to have a casual yet engaging scene.

 

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Spaghettis Burger Dress

Andres Salaff serves up a steaming sub sandwich of revolution in his latest animation, Spaghettis Burger Dress.  Word around the campfire is that he plans to make a whole series of these animated paintings.  Salaff’s films have played in festivals around the world and now they’re available online.  Check out Andres’s videos on his YouTube channel.

Ryan De La Hoz’s Analog Patterns & Collages

Paper Cuts from Bradley Tangonan on Vimeo.

Long time pal and semi-recent B/D blog contributor Ryan De La Hoz not only likes to support fellow artists by blogging about them but also makes lots of wonderful work as well. In gearing up for his solo show at RVCA | VASF Gallery in SF Ryan took a few sneak peak photos for us of the new work. The show opens  Friday March 15th from 7 – 10pm and will feature an assortment of paintings, drawings, collage, and sculpture. Check out the video above for more insight into Ryan’s world and to learn about his analog art world.

The Playfully Surprising Juxtapositions Of Derek Paul Boyle

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The work of artist Derek Paul Boyle can often seem humorous.  Everyday objects are presented in simple juxtapositions that can be pleasantly surprising.  His work begins with suppositions, trusted concepts, and expectations and ‘plays’ with them.  Boyle depicts the familiar from a different conceptual angle to make his subject matter new.  He says:

“I am interested in the power of contradiction, objects as events, and incompatible states of the self – what was once bound is made free, the known made unknown. In a wavering step between angst and serenity, fear and pleasure, I want to give form to anxiety, a shape to tension.”

Peter Funch

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This series, entitled Babel Tales, is a recent work of Danish photographer Peter Funch. To create each photograph, he sat at an NYC street corner with a tripod and snapped away, eventually finding common elements amongst all the pictures and compositing those elements into one shot. The result is something familiar yet very artificial – feeling almost as if each photo is staged.

Satoshi Tomizu Traps Space, Galaxies And Planets Into Tiny Glass Spheres

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An entire galaxy trapped into a tiny glass sphere. Japanese Glass artist Satoshi Tomizu in his Space Glass series fabricates planets and dust trails by heating up glass. A traditional technique using heat energy and the talent of a man. The rendering is fascinating and creates a world of magic and fantasy.

The artist depicts the solar system and the universe inside transparent glass balls. The planets are made out of opals placed in the center, flecks of real gold and trails of colored glass that spins and twirls in concentric circles. They all are the size of an eyeball and have a small glass loop which allows the piece to be turned into a pendant. Each piece in unique and different.

Satoshi Tomizu’s work is full of details. The eye can catch the twirls of colors but quickly looses track of each individual features. There’s something magical in carrying a poetic scenery around one’s neck. Space dust, rainbow colored trails, stars and asteroids are elements which evoke fantasy and the possibility to escape the present moment. (via This Is Colossal)

Sandro Giordoano’s Twistedly-Funny Photographs Of People Falling Flat On Their Face

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With television game shows like Wipeout and American Ninja Warrior (and every slapstick movie, too), it’s no surprise that some of us derive pleasure from seeing people get hit. Photographer Sandro Giordoano’s twisted (both literally and figuratively) series In Extremis (bodies with no regret) capitalizes on the fall of others The staged images feature people comically posed in awkward and unflattering positions.

Always face down, the poor subjects are often garishly dressed and surrounded by their belongings. This is Giordano’s commentary on our attachments to our possessions; in every photograph, you’ll see the person clutching something like a watering can, oversized tennis ball, and even a power tool. To him, the characters in his compositions are oppressed by their appearance and the need to have things – and save them, even at their own expense. Their fall signifies that they hit rock bottom, and that they need to reexamine their life. (Via Laughing Squid)