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Diana Chyrzynska Remixes Beautiful Faces To Surprising Effect

Diana Chryzynska - Photography Diana Chryzynska - Photography Diana Chryzynska - Photography Diana Chryzynska - Photography

Diana Chryzynska’s photoshop-ed female faces seem surprising natural upon first sight. With most of the pieces of a normal face present, the viewer’s brain mashes them together to make sense of them, when actually they’re quite reworked. It’s fascinating how well your brain is able to reconcile two noses and two mouths sandwiched between two hands with eyes on top. Somehow, it takes a few seconds to realize what you’re seeing is completely surreal. Of course you realize what you’re looking at isn’t quite right, but it takes a while for your brain to sort out exactly what that is.

Maybe what makes the images more consumable is the appealing features: big eyes, luscious lips, unblemished skin.  I don’t think it’s that, though. It’s like when you read a word like baeufitul, and your brain is able to organize it into beautiful (with some coaxing). The see-through hands over the faces are the most interesting in terms of theme. They feel like veils, hiding the strange faces from view, though not entirely. It feels like the women are hiding their mixed up faces, but some are peaceful while others are confrontational. Most close their eyes, but the confrontational ones stare out from behind their hands, self-consciously aware of their strange arrangement.

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Made With Color Presents: Pop Culture And Vintage Comics Colide In The Work Of Emmett Potter

Emmett Potter - Design 40Emmett Potter - Design 36Emmett Potter - Design 35Brawl_BlackFinal.jpgWe’re glad to introduce, via the website building platform Made With Color, new artists weekly. Made With Color is an interactive website builder helping creative people design their portfolio without a complicated set up. The templates are minimalistic in their structure and their colors, allowing the eyes of the readers to focus on the art pieces.  This week we’re excited to share the work of Made With Color user Emmett Potter.

Vibrant colors and figurative shapes live in Emmet Potter’s art pieces. The artist uses mid 20th century comic graphics, advertisements, found objects and photography. His subjects therefore become mixed media pieces blending collage and paint. He calls them ‘handmade ready-mades’. Characters in action involving guns, missiles, love and war in a vivid and  expressive environment. The content depicted by Emmett Potter is inspired by Pop culture and Jungian archetypes. A chosen process to help increase communication with the mass and unfold collective consciousness. The rendering takes the form of traditional canvas paintings or unusual sculpture composition.

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“Vaginal Knitting” As Activist Performance Art

casey Jenkins vaginal knitting

casey Jenkins vaginal knitting

Melbourne based artist Casey Jenkins is a self-described “craftivist” who founded Craft Cartel, an organization that seeks to combine crafting and political activism, in 2007. “Craft imbues you with power because you’re forced to contemplate the issue you’re addressing. It’s very reflective in a sense of when you put that message out into the world, people know you must really care because you’ve devoted that much time to it,” Jenkins says.

Jenkins’ most recent performance project, “Casting Off My Womb” (Aussie TV calls it “Vaginal Knitting”) involves the artist spending 28 days (the average length of a menstrual cycle) knitting from a new skein of wool that she has placed inside of her vagina each day. Jenkins explains that her performance would not be a performance if she didn’t include menstruation. While she is menstruating, Jenkins says it becomes more difficult to knit because the wool is wet, and she has to tug on the thread a bit harder. Overall, though, she claims the process is slightly uncomfortable, but can also be arousing at times. For Jenkins, she enjoys that her performance associates the vulva – something that can be found offensive or vulgar or invoke a level of fear – with the comfort and warmth that knitting provides and evokes.

“The fact that [cunt’s] considered the most offensive word in the English language is a real marker of the time that we’re living and of the society’s attitude towards woman. There’s nothing possibly negative about it. It’s just a deep, warm and delightful part of the female anatomy.”

As Gawker notes, this performance is reminiscent of other feminist performance pieces like Yoko Ono’s “Cut Piece,” Carolee Schneeman’s “Internal Scroll,” or even Mary Kelly’s pre- and post-partum documents, so Jenkins is not necessarily a trailblazer in the context of this aesthetic; however, that fact that pieces like this still shock and provoke viewers means that there is still much work to be done in the movement to empower women and destigmatize female anatomy. (via gawker and broadsheet)

Catherine Nelson’s Incredible Digital Floating Worlds

Catherine Nelson is a visual artist who uses the digital medium to create orbital worlds of  imaginary landscapes. Her ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Trained as a painter in Sydney and London and with years of experience in the creation of visual effects for feature films like Moulin Rouge and Harry Potter, she now has dedicated her skills to her own art work combining the techniques from both these worlds into a new contemporary art medium.

Christian Weber Photography

Christian Weber‘s photography definitely catches your attention. Whether it’s a screaming baboon or just a straight on portrait, his shots are memorable. My favorite is of the one and only Karl Lagerfeld.

Carole Epps

02CEPPEnter the miniature world of Carole Epps.  Sinister. Cute. Dark. Mysterious. Wabbits & Mickey Mouse.  Seems like a fun and slightly scary world to live in.  I wouldn’t mind staying for a while.

Vik Muniz’ Huge Scrap Metal Animals

Vik Muniz installation6 Vik Muniz installation7

Vik Muniz installation1

Brazilian artist Vik Muniz created these images of animals using scrap metal.  You can get idea of the huge scale of Muniz’ work by looking at the first image – notice the pile of car doors on the left.  Much of Muniz’ art is an accumulation of what many would consider garbage to create fine art.  He creates huge ‘collages’ from these objects, photographs them, and returns them to their smaller scale.  You may recognize Muniz and his work from the acclaimed documentary Wasteland in which his process was detailed. [via]