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Chrissy Angliker’s Meaningful Drippings

The focus of Chrissy Angliker’s painting style lies in creating a balanced relationship between the controllable and the uncontrollable.  Paint drips from every deliberate brush stroke, challenging it.  By contrasting form and free-falling dribble, she seeks to illustrate the duality in life between our best-laid plans and the host of chaotic shit that can befall them.

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Katy Krantz

communing couple

Katy Krantz makes magical collage/painting hybrids.  They bring to mind the French Surrealists’ favorite quote: “beautiful as the chance meeting on a dissecting table of a sewing machine and an umbrella”.*

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Timothy Archibald Photographs His Autistic Son As Therapy

autistic Photography Photography

autistic son

Echoliia, a collection of photographs taken by Timothy Archibald, is a heart-warming study of the photographer’s 5-year-old autistic son, Eli. In hopes to get his frustrations out through creativity, Archibald photographed his son’s odd but endearing behaviors in order to understand him better and create a stronger, trustworthy relationship between the two of them.

The collection reveals the child’s unique perspectives and interaction with the world around him. With a trashcan on his head and a cardboard tube ’arm’, Eli conquers his world. His dad couldn’t be prouder to capture the uniqueness he exudes.

“I never wanted [Eli] to think that he was normal. I wanted him to be aware of how different he was and see that as an asset.”

Through this series, not only do you acknowledge Eli’s quirks, but also witness Archibald’s accepting and loving gaze.The father and child collaboration is available in book form on the artist’s website. (via My Modern Met)

Björk was as elusive to me as the Northern Lights, but both made brief appearances at Iceland Airwaves 2012

Sigur Rós performing on the final night of Iceland Airwaves 2012

I’ve been back for a few days now from Reykjavik and still find it difficult to put into words how Iceland Airwaves 2012 was… amazing, cold, epic, windy, sleepless, beautiful? All of the above! It’s still a bit hazy to me what actually went down. Did Sigur Rós perform a new song? Did Útidúr actually play six shows? Did I fall in love with Sóley? Did the Blue Lagoon turn into the Ice Lagoon thanks to Hurricane Sandy? All of these things happened, but it still feels like a dream. So many musical highlights that it’s hard to name just a few, but when Sigur Rós took the stage at Laugardalshöllin Arena on the final night of the festival, I knew that there was no other place in the world I’d rather be. While I missed seeing Björk around town and a rather brief appearance by the Aurora Borealis, I did manage to make some new friends, eat a ton of Pylsur (Icelandic hot dogs), and discover EXITMUSIC who took my breath away at Harpa. Early bird tickets to next year’s festival go on sale December 1st  and like every year, it’s gonna be sold out before you know it. 

Artwork Of The Day: Michael Clinard

Michael Clinard photography

Michael Clinard is one of the many, many, many talented creative minds that make up the Beautiful/Decay creative community. Michael didn’t ask to be posted on the blog and didn’t submit his work. I found his site while reading a comment he left on one of our blog posts. Lucky for me (and you) Michael happens to be a brilliant photographer whose photographs are smart, playful, and conceptual all at once.Hope this makes up for the auto play video Michael!

Vhils Carved Street art portraits

Vhils doesn’t just apply his street art on top of walls but actually carves into them creating a permanent site specific image that is ingrained onto the surface of the buildings. Becoming one with the pre-existing architecture Vhils chips, scratches, and cuts away at the walls revealing images that were there all along but that no one could see.

Photographer Giorgio Cravero’s Color-Seeping Fruits And Veggies Express The Pain And Perseverance Of Nature

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Giorgio Cravero is an Italian photographer who has combined food photography with social criticism, producing a series of surreal images that metaphorically explore environmental degradation and the perseverance of nature. The color seeping from each fruit and vegetable represents humankind’s brutal exploitation of natural resources, as our unsustainable practices seek to strip nature of its very essence. In a vampiric fashion, like lifeblood drained from a body, the fruits and veggies blacken where the color filters down. However, hope remains, as the top holds its pigment. As Cravero explains:

“Men are poison for the earth. […] Nature will outlive us: in the fruit and toxic vegetables, where color slides away, there’s the upper part which firmly holds the color of life. Do we really think that we can make a difference? Do we really think, in the age of technology, that we can lay down mankind’s law to the extent that we dominate the law of nature?” (Source)

At the core of Cravero’s series is a message about the inevitable pitfalls of human arrogance. As our technological capacities have increased, so has our pride, and so we manufacture our own destruction. “The blackened chicory, the abandoned carrots are the clear images that, okay, we needed a knife to tear the meat off our prey, therefore we are technical beings for survival,” he writes, explaining where the inflated sense of confidence and self-importance came from, “but Earth had also imposed on us to be humble.” Cravero maintains that, for us, this is a fatal type of arrogance, but nature itself will survive in some form. “Nature defeats us in silence, or in any case, it will stay here for longer than us, it will be run-down, but it will still be there. […] Nature doesn’t give a damn about our pain or our profit logic” (Source).

Visit Cravero’s website, Facebook page, and Behance to see more of his work. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Sophia Collier’s Water-like Portraits Of The Wind

Sophia Collier Sophia Collier Sophia Collier

Working in her studio in Sausalito, CA, sculptor Sophia Collier uses a combination of acrylic block and algebraic function (with a little help from a CNC router), to carve sculptures of wind. The clear, floating relief works look like freeze-frame slices of the water’s surface. She spends a great deal of time replicating the effects that both wind and light create on a large body of water using custom rendering software and sound recordings of the wind. Collier carefully mimics its movements and reactions with a series of digital “brushes” she has created, working to develop unique strings of information to carve out each piece. The sound waves move and fluctuate in the digital space just as they do in the physical realm—and the result is a crystallized portrait of the wind, giving the visual effect of sunlit water. She outlines her entire process here.