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York Christoph Riccius

York Christoph Riccius’ work is proof that commercial photography doesn’t have to be dull and boring. York  photographs for some of the worlds biggest brands and manages to push the boundaries of what corporate America will accept for their campaigns.

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Mary Ann Heagerty


I found Mary Ann Heagerty on our friend Graham’s blog (Future Shipwreck): she is a sensational sculptor, chic craftswoman, radical rock collector, and also his roommate. Here are some of her work, which includes dentures made out of lollipops and wood chips, hand castings, a giant three-dimensional mirror diamond, hair trapped in wax hexagon, and a series of carefully hollowed-out eggs incubating invitations to a MOCA opening. She also does these awesome video shorts that are uploaded on her Youtube channel about crafts with unlikely materials.

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Street Art Utopia’s Best of 2011

 

I couldn’t help but direct everyone to fellow public art loving blog Street Art Utopia as they have compiled a pretty decent list of the best street art of 2011. If you are just getting into the wonderful world of pasting, spraying or making the streets a more creative place, this list is a great place to start (short of  Wall and Piece). One of the best things about this genre is it’s diversity – you can decided what you find gimmicky/twee or meaningful and awe-inspiring. Street art has always been the public’s voice, and the art world has yielded success to those with great ideas and a call for change. More from the list after the jump!

Family Values: 5 Artists Draw Inspiration From Family

Zhang Xiaogang

Zhang Xiaogang

Song Dong photography

Song Dong

Seonna Hong

Seonna Hong

The saying “home is where the heart is” very rarely relates to contemporary art.  And though the works featured here are not directly about home, they are informed to some degree by immediate family,relationships and experiences that stem from it.  In a global spectrum of east meets west these five artists come from genres ranging from Chinese Avant Garde to lowbrow painting, from surrealism to contemporary portraiture, to name a few.  The paintings, mixed media works and digital media stills of artists: Song Dong, Brooke Grucella, Seonna Hong, Aaron Holz and Zhang Xiaogang exemplify the diversity with which the artists’ loved ones have become not only the subject for the works, but also at times part of the process, as well as a platform to tell a story that becomes increasingly universal.

I recall visiting the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco a couple of years ago to see Song Dong’s massive solo exhibition of works made with his family members as subjects, as well as a massive installation that incorporated decades worth of of family possessions as material.  His work is deeply personal, with a strong narrative thread, and truly draw you into his world with their reverence and profoundly flawless execution.  Zhang Xiaogang’s works from his series Bloodlines uses other family portraits as a vehicle for conveying the experiences of his immediate family that they experienced as he came of age during the Chinese Cultural Revolution.  Each piece in this series has a thin red line that weaves throughout the composition, symbolizing the connection of heritage and family.

Awesome Video of the Day: Reloaded by Baskerville

Claymation at its finest can be found in this video by Baskerville. Tagged as “a scientific experiement gone terribly terribly wrong”, It’s so detailed right down to the smoke which is made out of hair! Watch the video after the jump.

Jennifer Sullivan- Bad Means Good

Jennifer Sullivan Paintings

When I first saw Jennifer Sullivan’s work I didn’t like it. But after looking at it for a few days it’s slowly growing on me. At first glance the paintings may seem naive and referencing the late 90’s craze of “bad painting” but I think there are some interesting things going on in the work that deserve a closer look.

Make sure to visit her site and explore the installations that sometimes accompany the work as well as Jennifer’s hilarious “feelings/Ideas” section where she ponders everything from “art based outfits” to “Artists That I Think Are Really Cool”.

Interview: Bryan Dalton





Bryan Dalton is a multi-faceted artist creating a broad range of projects, from a website entitled “Sweet Gifs” devoted entirely to the increasingly popular early 90’s proto-web-wizardry of, you guessed it, sweet gifs, to a bi-annual independently published “pyschedelic field trip” ‘zine. On top of this all, he runs a freelance photo-illustration, design and animation firm in Portland Oregon. The unifying aesthetic that unites all his divergent practices is a playful irony and with a touch of kitsch-magic.

Teppei Kaneuji’s Ready Made Plastics

Japanese artist Teppei Kaneuji’s assemblages of ready made objects could be described as ‘time based sculpture’, not only due to their process of making, but also because of the ideas he works with. In his White Discharge (Built-up Objects) series for example, objects are categorized by form and color, dismantled, and then piled up and connected to other objects, with white polyester resin poured gradually over the final construction. Kaneuji does not seek meaning the materials he selects or the forms he builds. Rather, he dislocates objects, depriving them of their original function and value as consumer goods. His method is rooted in his own physical senses and the rhythms of contemporary life as he experiences it; he compares his process to that of a music mix-tape, which links songs together using personal criteria.
(via junk culture)