Get Social:

Steve Jobs Cheese Head Supreme

SteveJobsCheeseHead4

Chef Ken has taken Mac Fanboy-dom and food sculptural likenesses to a…ahem…cheesy new level. Savor the delights of Steve Jobs head on an appetizer platter, in a sizzling plate of “iPad Thai” or in a festive nacho concoction.  A big ghastly when his head melts all over the chips. I can’t really say much more.

Advertise here !!!

Advertise here !!!

Delightfully Morbid Still Lifes Feature Disney Princesses And My Little Pony

disney princesses

8

13

9

The surrealist artist Cristina Burns creates tiny, magical worlds made of skulls, toys, and delightfully kitschy knickknacks; her series Through the Mirror appeals to the subconscious mind, inviting viewers to engage with seemingly disparate materials that together form a strangely cohesive narrative. Inspired in part by the Oniric movement, the bizarre and delightfully pink work allows viewers to make surprising associations within carefully constructed scenes; the familiar and the frightful work in tandem, frantically blurring the lines between fantasy and reality.

Burns’s images, imbued with the innocent connotations of budding flowers, baby deer figurines, and Victorian lace, introduce comically dark elements: a round eyeball, brains served on a platter with a fork. Together, the delightful and the dangerous work to create arrangements that might be viewed as manic and surreal altars to the dead. In one elegant image, a skeleton attracts the attentions of a large beetle, an insect often symbolic of decay, with the presence of budding funereal flowers and sweets.

The meticulous symmetry of Burns’s compositions heightens the idea of supernatural harmony between purity and sin, between life and death. Much of the work centers around a symbol of man and especially womankind’s fallenness: Eve or Snow White’s skull bites an apple, or a mermaid figurine peers woefully at a deteriorating skull at her feet. In this state of death and corruption, there exists too a powerful sense of play, as seen through delicate china mice, candy hearts, and Disney princess dolls. In this way, Burns’s imaginative and feminine dreamscapes capture the allure of mischief, for in our disobedience and fallenness lies a magical sort of madness and celebration.

Make something cool every day

"MSCE 1/07/09: i printed out a screen grab of the tool bar and asked my wife to hold it against the screen. "

"MSCE 1/07/09: i printed out a screen grab of the tool bar and asked my wife to hold it against the screen. "

…is the name of illustrator/design (and creative director at Carmichael Lynch in Minneapolis) Brock Davis’ project where he makes something every day. The way he approaches the daunting task of having to physically create a new object every day amazes me- his ideas are so fresh! I really feel like I will never look at the objects in the same way again! Smart design that’s hard to come by these days…

 

A Day In Decay: Vicious Italian Smily Face Graffiti

italian graffiti

Has anyone else noticed the vicious smily face graffiti gang that owns the streets of Italy? These guys go from town to town painstakingly scribbling their frightening faces all over the city walls. Lets pray that these blood thirsty happy face bandits don’t attack the red, white, and blue next! As community service to the Italian nation, I began a catalog of these horendous crimes in hopes of tracking down these criminals and once and for all turning their smiles upside down!

Carol Milne Intricately “Knits” Glass To Create Dainty And Beautiful Objects

Carol Milne - Glasswork Carol Milne - Glasswork Carol Milne - Glasswork

Carol Milne is a Seattle-based artist originally from Canada who has been making beautiful “knitted” objects out of glass. A knitter since she was ten and long fascinated by the sculptural arts, Milne invented an interesting glass-forming technique that combines these two passions. First, she wraps the soft glass around a knitting needle to get the coils, which she then unfurls into “stiches.” After that, she interlocks the stitched pieces together to create the knitted texture. Each sculpture is an experiment in color, resulting in everything from pastel hues to rainbow gradients. Watch this video from Heather DiPietro for a longer description of her process.

Milne has a lot of experience sculpting with other materials (such as bronze casting and metalwork), but she has always been fascinated by glass. As she states in this article by The Creators Project, “[glass] can take on an infinite number of forms and textures. It can show an interior image and an exterior image simultaneously. It’s translucent and transparent. It plays with light. It looks cool when it’s hot” (Source). Exploring the malleability of her medium, the result is a series of endearing and delicate pieces that change the way we see ordinary knitted objects, enlightening us with new forms of everyday beauty.

Visit Milne’s website and Facebook page to view more of her sculptural work. (Via The Creators Project)

Michal Macku’s Manipulated Gellage Self Portraits

Since the end of 1989, Michal Macku has used his own creative technique which he has named “Gellage” (the ligature of collage and gelatin). The technique consists of transfer the exposed and fixed photographic emulsion from its original base on paper. This transparent and plastic gelatin substance makes it possible to reshape and reform the original images, changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer.

“I use the nude human body (mostly my own) in my pictures. Through the photographic process [of Gellage], this concrete human body is compelled to meet with abstract surroundings and distortions. This connection is most exciting for me and helps me to find new levels of humanness in the resulting work.
I am always seeking new means of expression and, step by step, I am discovering almost unlimited possibilities through my work with loosened gelatin. Photographic pictures mean specific touch with concrete reality for me, one captured level of real time. The technique of Gellage which I am using helps me to take one of these “time sheets” and release a figure, a human body, from it, causing it to depend on time again. Its charm is similar to that of cartoon animation, but it is not a trick. It is very important for me to be aware of the history of a picture and to have a sense of direct contact with its reality. My work places “body pictures” in new situations, new contexts, new realities, causing their “authentic” reality to become relative. I am interested in questions of moral and inner freedom. I do what I feel, and only then do I begin to meditate on what the result is. I am often surprised by the new connections I find in it. Naturally, I start out with a concrete intention, but the result is often very different. And there, I believe, lies a hitch. One creates to communicate what can not be expressed in any other way. Then comes the need to describe, to define.” (via)

uberkraaft

British artist Matt Williams A.K.A Uberkraaft  should be renamed Uberkool! He’s got a beautiful portfolio full of ultra detailed black and white illustrations as well as perfectly colored pieces that are bold but not too pushy. More visual eye candy after the jump!