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Celebrate New Year’s with…Gin & Tonic Mist?

Why drink Gin & Tonics the old fashioned way through liquid, when you can suit up in a plastic hazmat rain coat and inhale your alcohol through the air? Food architects Bompas & Parr turn boozin’ into a brand new experience.

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El Anatsui Turns Bottles Caps And Tin Lids Into Expansive Morphing Tapestries

El Anatsui - Installation 15
El Anatsui - Installation 17

El Anatsui - Installation 16

A million little pieces stitched together shapes a large moving tapestry. The waves of the installation, similar to chainmail, create a voluptuous presence. Artist El Anatsui is mesmerizing our senses and attracting our curiosity. He designs from simple materials complex compositions, using all sorts of tools to merge modest means into powerful and impressive pieces. In between sculpture (for the structure) and painting (for the way colors drop from different angles), the delicate and monumental pieces cannot be categorized.

El Anatsui’s work emphasizes the fact that art is a sixth sense, an add-on and a value that’s indescribable. From liquid bottle caps, iron nails, driftwood or cassava graters the artist creates morphing mosaics that are hung up the walls of monuments and museums in major cities. Seen from far away, the meticulously assembled little pieces become an accumulation of gems. Each installation is non fixed and can be moved from one place to another without ever having the same appearance. Just like fabric, the piece is creased, folded and adjusted to its in-situ set.

The artist’s impact on one hand is for the viewer to reflect on obvious key topics such as consumption, waste and environment. The bottle caps or the tin lids that he uses represent simultaneously garbage and manpower, thinking of that while he creates helps him give a spiritual dimension to his art.
On the other hand, the pieces help make a connection between America, Africa and Europe. The fact that the installations are hung questions the part of a wall as sequestration, protection or deprivation from freedom.
“Artists are not dictators”, El Anatsui claims loud and clear next to his pieces. He doesn’t want to impose an idea because everyone’s point of view is valid.

The artist was awarded in April 2015 at the Venice Biennale with a Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. Watch the video below of one of the greatest artistic influencer amongst two generations of artists working in West Africa.

El Anatsui’s work is currently shown at Jack Shainman Gallery  until September 2015.

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Abbey McCulloch’s Evocative Paintings of the Female Figure

 

Really nice work from Australian artist Abbey McCulloch. There’s almost a fashion illustration vibe with these paintings, which feature female figures staring at you from eyes weighed down with heavy makeup. And so often when an artist does cite fashion illustration as an influence, what they really mean is straight up fashion illustration placed in a gallery setting. That wouldn’t be the case with McCulloch’s work, whether she drew direct inspiration from the realm of fashion or not. Her palette selection is so good. And the expressions on her subjects’ faces, captured with  just a few brushstrokes, are uncommonly evocative. Click past the jump to see more. (via)

Beautiful/Decay Book: 7 Sneak Peak Part 2 & Contest!

 

Attention Cult Of Decay! The latest issue of Beautiful/Decay is upon us! Sent to the printers in the last weeks, there will be only 2000 copies produced (all of which are ad-free) and only subscribers will receive their copy before anyone else does. You also save 33% by subscribing versus waiting to buy at a bookstore (plus you don’t have to go past your mailbox to get it!). Subscribe today and secure your newest addition to the Beautiful/Decay series. We’re also holding a contest for your chance to win a free copy of the book so get all the details and a few more peaks at what the new book has to offer after the jump.

 

 

Erik Jones’ Splices Together Fragments Of Women And Geometric Patterns

Erik Jones - paintingErik Jones - painting Erik Jones - painting Erik Jones - painting

Erik Jones paints a blend of vibrant, colorful, graphic-orientated paintings with hyper realistic, disconnected parts of women’s bodies. Originally from St Petersburg, Florida he moved to New York with $81 and took different jobs in the comic industry – an influence to which he owes his distinct graphic style. They are a original mix of pop styling with hard lines and distinct patterns, sporadic mark making and illustrative details of the female form. High fashion magazine-style renderings of faces, breasts and limbs are broken up and disjointed by digital-like patterns.

Realizing his passion for illustration and figure rendering, Jones initially was drawn to animation and creating stimulating visuals. Not completely satisfied by just animating, he applied the techniques he learnt to painting. He starts his creative process with a photoshoot, or various inspirational photos, then adds the figure reference and refines it digitally. He explains more:

I build on top of the figure as if they were wearing these shapes. I’ll also create patters with the shapes to move your eye around in a structured way. Despite all the clutter and chaos in these newer works, there is something soothing and comfortable in each piece, at least I feel there is. I believe it’s the patterns that you’re subconsciously finding that keep it from being completely chaotic and overwhelming to look at. (Source)

Jones uses several different types of media to build up a textured, layered, collage look. Even though his work is a blend of so many different elements, he tries to give equal weighting to each of them. He says most importantly for him is to keep a harmonious balance, and not to glorify the figure. 

Joe Diebes

Joe Diebes is one of those guys who is so smart you can feel the smartness coming off them in waves, like heat on blacktop. I don’t pretend to understand what he’s thinking, but like Potter Stewart explained hard core porno by saying “I know it when I see it,” it’s easy to see something intense happening in Diebes’ sound and video collage.  He created a recording of a musician, the cellist Rubin Kodheli, and then sort of collaged it back together using a mathematical algorithm.  One interesting conceptual aspect of this video, Scherzo, is that it never repeats.  And I don’t mean that it doesn’t repeat in this little one minute snippet, I mean that if you played it for one hundred years and sat there – it wouldn’t repeat the same sequence twice.  I told you, this guy’s smart.  You can see Scherzo at Paul Rodgers 9w gallery until December 2nd, and at the Liverpool Biennial until November 28th.

Teale Coco Designs Empowering Accessories Inspired By Occultism, Fetish, And Human Anatomy

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Lunar Eclipse” catsuit, “Lucifer” fullbody harness, “Starlight” bloomers, and “Lunar” bralette. Photo: Tasha Tylee | Makeup: Brianna Rourke

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blackmass” fullbody harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blk Magic” thigh garter, “Cult” bloomers, and “Widows Peak” crop. Photo: Taygan Bassi

Teale Coco - Fashion

Left: “Lucifer” fullbody harness and “Starlight” bloomers. Right: “Cult” bloomers, “Coven” bralette, and “Demonic Possessions” shoulder harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco is a Melbourne-based designer, photographer, and international model who has crafted her own dark and fascinating brand of handmade accessories. Inspired by occultism, fetish, and human anatomy, Teale’s designs are characterized by powerful statement pieces influenced by occult symbols — such as the pentagram and sign of the triple goddess — in addition to harnesses that mold to the body in provocative ways. As a synthesis of dark themes and alternative culture, Teale’s work is a holistic approach to fashion, one that melds personal identity with empowering aesthetics.

“Fashion is art,” Teale wrote in a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay. “I don’t have boundaries with what I create, and I set no limitations. […] Human anatomy is one of my biggest influences. The shapes, sizes, lumps, bumps, bone, flesh: everything is derived from a natural source — even our technology today was first inspired by the mystery that is nature.” And, referring to how her “Medusa” full leg harness is an evolution of the garter (a time-honored fashion item), she goes on: “I am expanding these traditions and creating something unearthly.”

At the core of most subcultural fashion is a dissenting spirit that seeks expression beyond societal norms and limitations. The same energy drives Teale’s work as she endeavors to create pieces that foster individual empowerment. Following designer Yohji Yamamoto’s perspective on the seemingly paradoxical beauty of black — a “modest and arrogant” “color” that says “‘I don’t bother you, don’t bother me’” — Teale’s versatile pieces are both assertive and romantic, and can be hidden under clothes or displayed over top (Source). Furthermore, the harnesses are gender neutral and made to adapt to all body types, placing no restrictions on who can wear them. “I want people to love themselves, feel good, wear what they want to wear, and not judge themselves,” Teale wrote, explaining how body positivity was important to her project. “It’s not about what other people think about you, it’s how you feel about yourself — and my designs are here to help liberate you.”

Teale Coco the Brand is a passionate project that is destined to go far. In just over a year, after transforming her Etsy store into its own company, Teale’s work has gained an impressive, international following. All of the styling, designing, editing, creative direction, makeup, and social media are currently done by Teale herself, with a team of artisans sewing the designs. Check out the brand’s website, Facebook page, Tumblr, and Instagram to learn more. 

A Different Type Of Food Porn: Aurel Schmidt Draws Fruit And Vegetables With Genitals

Aurel Schmidt - Drawing Aurel Schmidt - Drawing

Aurel Schmidt - Drawing

Aurel Schmidt - Drawing

In two of Aurel Schmidt’s more recent series, the artist’s highly rendered drawings depict leafy vagina lettuce and ginger toes, among other inventive combinations of body parts and edibles. Her older drawings focused more on hedonism and a kind of consumptive chaos. She created party beasts constructed from accumulations of coke baggies, cigarette butts, pabst cans etc. They mischievously smiled out at the viewer like a visualization of a hangover. Even with discarded condoms and burn holes, she’s always had a tendency for beauty, though.

In contrast, the ideas in FRUITS are refined to a few poignant elements. There is a strong focus on associative forms, and Schmidt’s choice to pair white grapes with a plump penis emphasizes the gravity in the image. The nippled melon is equally sumptuous, and it’s great to finally see melon and breast united in one. Her style is laborious, but it doesn’t show in her drawings. She’s funny, with an I-don’t-give-a-fuck attitude that’s present throughout her work. It’s not indignant or aggressive; it’s joyful and celebrates absurdity and decay.

Black Drawings returns to a more standard subject matter for Schmidt, and the drawings become more severe without colour, maybe even cult-ish. The bellybuttons are the most seductive, because of their subtlety and curiosity. It takes a while to identify them for what they are. This series definitely demonstrates Schmidt’s breadth of ability, where the spurting penis cross is much more in your face than the bright sunflower nipples.