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John Parot

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Check out these lovely works by up and coming artist, John Parot. This recent Chicago—-> LA transplant, has great use of color, pattern, composition and collage technique, plus he’s starting to delve into the realms of sculpture and animation! Looking good.

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Found Wood Transformed Into Geometrical Musical Instruments

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While Jack Sawbridge was studying architecture at the University of Nottingham, he became interested in sacred geometries and the ratios and styles associated with the form. He often finds pre-existing pieces of wood to use as his starting point before constructing their formal geometries. Sawbridge then integrates light, guitar strings, and/or glass sound tubes, giving these seductive forms a function. These beautiful works are fully operational and patrons are even allowed to experiment with them. Sawbridge’s work articulates the meticulous and delicate balance of architecture and sculpture.

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Performance Artist Shana Robbin’s Fearless Feminine Rituals

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The mystical, mesmerizing performance works of Atlanta-based artist Shana Robbins stretch the boundaries of the real. Her jarring, costumed and choreographed rituals of passage are strange and unreal, yet compelling. The photo-documentation of each performance points to carefully constructed sets, costumes and props that set the stage for her offbeat, painterly vision of theatre.  Conceptually the works address conditions of the natural realm, feminine existence and ritual with a futuristic, pagan edge. Drawing on her own experiences as a student of Butoh movement, Robbins explores methods of movement and storytelling that pull from ancient narratives of birth, death, identity and transformation.

The Influencers

A great cast of creative thinkers come together to discuss the art of influencing pop culture. Love the concept and execution but the images of the statue every 5 seconds makes me think they are trying to virally sell me something. I hope that’s not the case as that would ruin the entire video for me. Either way worth giving a look.

Paul Rucker’s Provocative Artwork Takes Back America’s History Of Racist Imagery And Symbols

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KKK robes recreated, bullets shot on purpose on white paper, a video pointing out the current incarcerations and lynching images depicted on a throw.  Paul Rucker’s exhibition is comprised of texts, a video, quilts, textiles and installations. All with the aim to tell stories that will shock, question and reflect on America’s police violence. According to Paul Rucker, it’s an ongoing process, hence the title of his exhibition: ‘Rewind’.

The artist’s vision is plural. The exhibition translates a dramatization of how the history of racism is affecting our present lives. The Klan robes are made out of new fabrics to strike and draw curiosity. He is using powerful symbols of racism to lead our current society to communicate and debate. His subjects are intentionally provocative.
When he stitches killing images on throws that are originally suppose to bring warmth and comfort, he is deliberately choosing to oppose two major elements: life and death.
In a ten minute video, he represents the 2.3 million people currently imprisoned on a map. The use of different color make the rendering visually more effective and speaks a greater deal to the eye.

Another series consists of shots on pieces of white paper. They are created with a pistol and are named by the city and date of the event. The artist runs a series of statistics and unveils that a number of unarmed individuals were shot by the police. Once again Paul Rucker wants to make a visual impact. Instead of explaining and narrating a story, the shots on the white papers create tension. It’s an effective summary of a thousand words.

The purpose of this exhibition is to make a clear testimony on what has happened, is happening and will, undoubtedly happen again in the future.
Paul Rucker’s ‘Rewind’ exhibition is displayed at the Baltimore Museum of Art until November 15th 2015. (via huffington post)

Thomas Card Documents Outrageous And Alluring Tokyo Street Style

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We’ve always known that as far as street style goes, Tokyo rules. Inhabitants of the city don elaborate outfits and express a strong point of view through their appearance. Photographer Thomas Card’s new book Tokyo Adorned highlights more than 130 photos of these iconic looks. From Lolitas to cosplay to Yamanba, he captures girls who wear gas masks, laced top-hats, and plastic backpacks shaped like bat wings.

The photographer traveled to Tokyo a year after the devastating tsunami hit. “The country experienced an upsurge of national pride,” he writes, “and participants in street fashion increasingly celebrated their unique placement within the Japanese culture at large.”

Card removed his subjects from context (the street) and photographed them in front of a white background. Here, their outfits take center stage, an we’re able to focus on all of the incredible details and painstaking effort that goes into crafting these personas. Some of them are dark while others ooze innocence. Card’s series is a refined, delightful look at the intricacies of these subcultures.

With all this outrageous dress, does the line between personality and appearance ever become blurry? You have to ask yourself, what kind of person wears a full-sized teddy bear as a necklace? Card insists that his subjects know that people are staring, and they have a sense of humor about it. In an interview with Slate, he explains, “Everything from the names they choose for themselves to the particular arrangement of items and accessories and clothing often reflects a particular sense of humor. One woman’s name translates to ‘Barbecue.’ The humor of that is not lost on her.” (Via Fast Company)

Interview: Huma Bhabha

Huma Bhabha is not unlike a medieval alchemist, transmuting discarded materials into works of art—morphing civilization’s dusty detritus into works of stunning beauty. They freely collapse ideological mores, the annals of history, contemporary art, yet transcend concretized fact or fiction. Instead, they resurrect their charred faces, standing as relics from a near distant future, or war-ravaged effigies to a post-apocalyptic past. This practice of temporal and physical shape-shifting seems to be both esoteric and playful at once—Bhabha notes that “turning lead into gold, or at least trying…is more interesting than just using gold.” Her visceral effigies are perhaps best described as “anti-monuments;” her works, in their materiality, do not desire permanence—rather, Bhabha formalizes their very transience through her use of ephemeral, corruptible and humble materials. 

Trey Speegle at Benrimon Contemporary

 

Trey Speegle just opened Good Luck With That, a solo show at Benrimon Contemporary in Manhattan. Speegle plays with familiar paint-by-number formulas in semi-abstract works full of color and personal significance. A few works in the show feature silhouetted horses among other elements that exist within a recognizable context, but the real star here is the artist’s subdued, flat application of color. The show will be up until October 20th, so if you’re out here, be sure to roll through.