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Interview: Ryan Colditz

fleetfoxes03_webThough the medium of stereoscopic optics have been blowing minds (and crossing eyes) since the late 1800’s, artist and designer Ryan Colditz takes the media to surprising new ends. Colditz plays with this dazzling visual trope to breath new life (and dimension) to graphic design and photography, creating a startling new aesthetic that literally manages to pop off the page. Beautiful/Decay recently discussed Ryan’s home made 3-D camera, process, inspiration, and beyond- read more after the jump!

 

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Corey Thompson’s Arrows & Pointers

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Arrows & Pointers is a vector pack full of arrows and things (download it here) that point made by designer and doodler Corey Thompson. Use ’em for whatever you want. Be dope, show Corey what you make! Check out some more of Arrows & Pointers as well as other cool stuff after the jump.

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Brad Kahlhamer Combines His Native American heritage And Post Punk Sensibilities In His Explosive Paintings And Sculptures

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Brad Kahlhamer uses his Native American heritage and post punk urban culture to paint large abstract symbols across canvas’ and create his own spiritual dolls. He is interested in culture and identity and through his art is building a world where he fits in. His artwork has an undertone of darkness meets the real world. A “third place” as Brad Kahlhamer calls it, where two opposing personal histories meet.

His paintings are filled with totems, poles, teepees, hawks and weaves combined with images from different cultures. It unveils an obsession for his ancestors and the modern life he is living. He is influenced by rock music and multiculturalism which is reflected in his paintings by the tone of colors and the display of the elements throughout the canvas. The dolls are a logical continuation of the artist’s train of thoughts.

Brad Kahlhamer has decorated the dolls with recycled and organic elements; feathers, bicycle-tire inner tubes, his own hair, discarded clothing, rope, and leather. Originally, the dolls are Katsina dolls, cottonwood carvings of Katsinam, spiritual beings in the Hopi religion. Respectful of the amalgam his pieces might have caused in terms of culture appropriation, the artist, always gave credit to the origin of his influences. The tribe he has created is carefully constructed. Blending geometric shapes, nails and wired legs to the essence of the Katsina dolls, the artist is empowering the individuals and blurring the lines between multiculturalism and abstract modernism.

Unsettling Photos Of Irish Ghost Housing Developments

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In some places in Ireland there are housing developments that stand like lonely sentries, waiting for people who never come. Valérie Anex’s series “Ghost Estates, Ireland, 2011” captures these eerie non-residences and their all but unused communal spaces.

The National Institute for Regional and Spatial Analysis NIRSA defines a ghost estate as a development of ten houses or more in which fifty per cent or less of homes are occupied or completed. In October 2010, according to official estimates, there were 2846 ghost estates and more than 350 000 vacant homes throughout the Republic of Ireland.

Even completed and populated these estates would be odd Stepford-like places, with their rows of identical buildings spreading across the countryside. Lived in, though, they would adapt and change, influenced by their residents. Landscaping, additions, a new front door color— eventually the sameness of the buildings would subside. Empty, though, the monotony is numbing. Anex’s photos are stark and documentary in style. The repetition of the house forms, a superfluous real-life copy and paste, benefit from their pragmatic composition. Anex doesn’t rely on fancy tricks or filters to evoke the paralysis of these places—the empty eyed windows and rubble-strewn lawns become increasingly disturbing with each image in the series.

These empty shells are eyesores for the locals in these small towns. The crisis is affecting the country – unemployment, debts, budget cuts, flights of capital investments – but it is also shaping its landscape. Bitter memories left by the spectral and temporary nature of the property boom in Ireland, ghost estates are the symbol of the property market’s collapse, a topology of the economic disintegration of the country.

There are some residents in these ghost estates, though Anex has chosen not to include them in her photos. Tana French’s chilling 2013 novel, Broken Harbor, is set in such a place. In that book, madness and murder and awful fear take place among the mostly empty and unfinished houses of an Irish ghost estate. Looking at these photos, it doesn’t seem a stretch. It can’t be comfortable to live in such a place, with unfinished houses and absent lives. (via Slate)

Dax Norman’s Psychedelic And Surreal Animated Gif World

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If you regularly tune in to Adult Swim, Austin based illustrator and animator Dax Norman‘s work may look familiar to you. Evoking a trippy aesthetic reminiscent of Mad Magazine and “The Yellow Submarine,” Norman’s gifs ooze and pulse with bright, fun energy. Citing classic and current influences and favorites such as Max Ernst, Man Ray, Van Gogh, Shel Silverstein, William Blake, Neil Anderson-Himmelspach, Reverend Bobby AngerDavid Olive, and Joseph Noderer, Norman creates animations informed by popular culture and the world around him, as well as animations that represent strangely and wonderfully original characters, figures, and shapes.

Norman first started making gifs by re-purposing existing longer animations into loopable snippets, but as the form started to grow on him, Norman began creating original gifs, trying to finish a new one every day. He creates both 2D and 3D animated gifs that deal with alternate and multiple perceptions of reality. Of his animations, Norman says, “I see them each as ‘little paintings,’  or ‘picture poems’ each with its own universe of movement…Playing with the looping idea, and rhythm, is what appeals to me the most. Hopefully… people can hear something in my moving pictures, even though there is no sound.” In addition to his extensive archive of gifs on Tumblr, Norman also has full video animations available on Vimeo as well as a Tumblr page dedicated to demonstrating his process of creation.

Seth Clark’s Abandoned Renderings

Seth Clark’s drawings give new meaning to “Beautiful/Decay) with his beautifully rendered drawings and painting of abandoned and collapsed buildings.

Evan Robarts’ Sculptures Made From Mundane Objects

 

Evan Robarts lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His playful sculptures are constructed from found objects and industrial materials. Robarts reinvigorates everyday items like brooms, hockey sticks, and bicycle frames when he transforms them into vibrant compositions. In one piece the combination of cake sprinkles and plaster results in a dazzling abstraction that looks good enough to eat. Another body of work utilizes Popsicle sticks and ink to imitate a plane of freshly melted treats. Robarts’ zestful work triggers multiple senses and reminds us that exuberance can be found in all things.

Celebrity Draft

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Mark Stockton’s commentary on celebrity culture.