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Lee Yun Hee’s Beautiful And Unique Ceramic Pieces Inspired By Literature And Story Telling

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South Korean artist Lee Yun Hee creates narrative ceramic pieces inspired by literature and story telling. She uses both Western and Eastern influences, creating a style of her own that is striking, unique and undoubtably contemporary. Her work is fragile and flawless, almost creating an aura of effortlessness. She uses her work to reflect upon stories of everyday people; their struggles, fears, hopes, and anxieties. Yet, most importantly to her, she is truly interested in documenting their “cures” — the sort of “up from below” type stories that end with a protagonist who has had the strength and endurance to overcome a difficult task. For example, her piece La Divina Commedia, reinterprets the classic 14th century poem by Dante. In her version, she depicts a young girl’s search for truth. She explains the tale behind the piece in an interview with Brilliant 30. She states,

“there was once a girl that received an oracle, telling her future. The knowledge, the predestined desire and insecurity left her troubled. In search of happiness and peace, she embarked on a journey. Along the way, she encountered many obstacles; but at the end, she discovered the peace she has been striving for…By overcoming anxiety and suppressing desire, the girl reaches a state of ultimate peace.”

Her work acts as windows into her own version of a fairy tale; she is able to re-create morality stories within her own framework.  She refers to her self as a collector— she takes influence from everything she sees. She explains, “I have been keen on collecting images since I was a child. I would rather cut out the pictures from cartoons than read them. Even the encyclopedia wasn’t safe. These processes have had more influence than anything else on my background as an artist.”

Lee Yun Hee’s work is mystical and fantastic. Though balancing modern, classic, Eastern, and Western styles, she has creating an epic body of art that is honest, profound, and truly unique.

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Alsa Cherie- Tribute to Daniel Balavoine

From my understanding, Daniel Balavoine was a french singer popular in the 1980s. Alsa Cherie sent us some street art that was posted in Gap in the High Alps. Poetic lyrics taken from Balavoine’s songs that if translated to English would butcher such a romantic language.

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Base Camp Bonn Youth Hostel Hosts Thematically Redesigned Caravans

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German hotel owner Michael Bonner has transformed a 600 square meter vacant warehouse into Base Camp Bonn Youth Hostel, an indoor landscape of 15 refurbished and themed caravans. Each caravan’s space is uniquely detailed and designed to reflect a particular era or theme, such as the “Hausboot,” “Flower Power,” and “Big Ben.” The hostel also plays host to two U.S. airstreams and two German railway cars that can accommodate small groups. This concept creates a charming community space for guests from all over the country. Prices vary per size and sleeping capacity, but start at EUR 54 per night. (via design boom)

Carl Warner Recreates Landscapes With Food

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English photographer Carl Warner creates realistic landscapes that are made out of food. As an experienced landscape photographer, Warner puts his talents to work in order to reinvent the conventional type. The ‘Foodscapes’ are created in Carl’s London studio where he crafts out each and every little detail (all components completely made out of food) through intricate and laborious steps. The scenes are photographed in layers from foreground to background. The food products used tend to wither quite quickly under the beaming lights, this might take each landscape even more time to get finished.

He first starts off with a set of drawings; he lines up the model-drawings that he would like to work with, and from those he picks the one that will be worked on.

Warner has a team of food stylists and other artists that help him with the process.

“ Although I’m very hands on with my work, I do use model makers and food stylists to help me create the sets. I tend to start with a drawing which I sketch out in order to get the composition worked out, this acts as a blue print for the team to work to.”

Intricate Digital “Fabergé Fractals” By Tom Beddard Look So Real You Can Almost Grab Them

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Fractals are a geometric concept and mathematical set that represent repeating patterns, also known as self-similarity. Scotland-based physicist and artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue, who we have previously featured for his generative graphic work, has recently been creating 3D geometric fractal designs that he refers to as “Fabergé Fractals” because of the detailed and ornate patterns that are rendered by the artist’s formulaic methods. At first glance, Beddard’s designs appear to be fully realized, physical forms due to the intricacies of the patterns and the technical skill that is applied to each generation.

Beddard explains, “The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.

“The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation.” (via my modern met)

Modern Day Ophelia: Photographers Reimagine Haunting Scenes Of Women Underwater

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The photographic studio founded and run by Robert Staudinger and Andreas Franke (based in Vienna) have been experimenting with many different post production techniques for a while. Their recent fascination is with water. Photographing different women just beneath the surface of water, their series Barrier is like a ghostly fairytale. The women seem to either be sinking down into the depths below, postmortem, or in a state of serenity and peace, enjoying a moment of calm. We are not quite sure whether the barrier is a help or a hindrance; something to protect the women or to hurt them. The images capture an intrusive moment, either like watching someone during their final moments of life, or having an intimate bathing experience. Whatever it is, Staudinger and Franke exploit the tension between tranquility and unease; push and pull; immersion and separation.

Playing with the concept of water in the past (The Phantasy Fairytales), Staudinger and Franke seem interested in exploring the quietness and other-worldliness of the substance. By including the element in their images, it changes the mood quite drastically, and in most cases makes it seem more surreal, ethereal and eerie.

Franke has also shot an old shipwreck off the coast of Key West (Vandenberg Project), digitally adding in components later on to complete the shots. Including ballet dancers, kickboxers, a girl holding a butterfly net, a woman hanging out laundry, and a whole lot of other surreal details, Franke became experienced in recreating watery effects on his subjects to blend them in seamlessly, and somewhat believably. To see more of their beautiful skills see here. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Ryan Seaman

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Combining elements of illustration, drawing, and digital media, Ryan Seaman‘s work has a lot movement and a lot of layers. Inspired by photography, painting and drawing, his design contains many elements of grunge, that he successfully combines with other media to create dynamic designs.

Amanda Merten

Amanda Merten makes you wonder what sorts of things you could cook up with the time you spend diving deep into the bowels of the internet in search of sacred, yet-undiscovered images of cats to turn into potential memes. From styling to modeling to photography– the skill she contributes to The Smartest Thing She’s Ever Said. Amanda seems to do it all and do it all pretty well. We talk to her here about being a do-it-all, the intriguing story she’s working out with her collaborator Alice Gregory, and the mythic lack of good Mexican food on the East Coast.