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Diana Chyrzynska Remixes Beautiful Faces To Surprising Effect

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Diana Chryzynska’s photoshop-ed female faces seem surprising natural upon first sight. With most of the pieces of a normal face present, the viewer’s brain mashes them together to make sense of them, when actually they’re quite reworked. It’s fascinating how well your brain is able to reconcile two noses and two mouths sandwiched between two hands with eyes on top. Somehow, it takes a few seconds to realize what you’re seeing is completely surreal. Of course you realize what you’re looking at isn’t quite right, but it takes a while for your brain to sort out exactly what that is.

Maybe what makes the images more consumable is the appealing features: big eyes, luscious lips, unblemished skin.  I don’t think it’s that, though. It’s like when you read a word like baeufitul, and your brain is able to organize it into beautiful (with some coaxing). The see-through hands over the faces are the most interesting in terms of theme. They feel like veils, hiding the strange faces from view, though not entirely. It feels like the women are hiding their mixed up faces, but some are peaceful while others are confrontational. Most close their eyes, but the confrontational ones stare out from behind their hands, self-consciously aware of their strange arrangement.

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Mariano Garcia

mariano garciaMariano Garcia is an amazing art director from Las Palmas De Gran Canaria, Spain. Mariano’s work is colorful and fun with plenty of eye-popping illustrations. Check it out.

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Adam Martinakis’ Digital Worlds

Polish pixel wizard Adam Martinakis’ digital illustrations are out of this world. I can’t figure out if these started as photographs, elaborate sets, or live completely within the computer but they are impressive nevertheless.(via vectro ave)

B/D Apparel Announces: Artist Shirt Of The Month!

Each month, Beautiful/Decay will release a new shirt on the Beautiful/Decay shop before they hit any retail stores. The shirts will be printed in unique color ways in a select print run of just 300 shirts. Oh, and did we mention that we’ll be giving you a 33% discount off retail prices, pricing them at just $20 a shirt?

 

Here’s a rundown of the B/D monthly shirt release:

 

– Available in advance before the season ships to retailers
– Unique color way printed in a select run of 300 shirts
– 33% discount off retail price, at just $20 a shirt

 

First Release “Lost Face” by Vladimir (Waldez) Snegotskiy aka Ctrl-V


Vladimir Sengotskiy creates his hypercolor fantasmagoric creations in multi-media, ranging from print, web, motion and beyond. His recent design for Beautiful/Decay apparel is a neo-neon medusa’s head mask, seething with bright purple, yellow, blue and brown snakes and line confetti. Carnival masques meets facepaint!

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE LOST FACE!

Jonathan Bates’ Big Black Delta plays Every Show like it’s his Last

Photo by James Moriarty

I’ve been a huge fan of Jonathan Bates’ music for a long time. He was in the LA based band Mellowdrone, who I first saw back at the Troubadour in 2003 and loved. I first saw Big Black Delta at the Satellite in Los Angeles in mid 2011 during one of the free Monday night residences. I can’t remember who else played that night, but Big Black Delta made a lasting impression. I didn’t even realize it was the singer from Mellowdrone, since it was just Bates on stage by himself in darkness with a laptop and an array of lights behind him with a harder electronic sound. I did know that I was instantly taken by the music and his intensity. Earlier this year I saw him open for M83 at Club Nokia, this time he was backed by two hard hitting female drummers which definitely made it a more powerful dynamic and I was blown away again.

I was fortunate enough to speak with him the other day and he was nothing more than gracious. When I asked about his intensity on stage, he mentioned the old adage, “I like to play every show like it’s my last, since you never know”. I also asked what was the one record that changed things for him in regards to making music. “Sparklehorse. When I first heard Good Morning Spider… he played all the instruments on that record and I thought, I could do something like that and make my own thing. I even named Mellowdrone after his band, using a three syllable name just like he did”. The “he” Jonathan is referring to is the late Mark Linkous, mastermind behind Sparklehorse. I mentioned that I had known him back in the late 80’s when we worked together at a telemarketing office in LA, he was in a band called Dancing Hoods at the time. Probably dated myself there, but hopefully he got a kick out of my story.

Yuri Suzuki’s Tiny Robot Orchestra Turns Drawings Into Music

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For Japanese designer Yuri Suzuki, dyslexia prevented him reading music in the traditional sense. But that didn’t stop him playing it. Instead, he adopted a playful approach and created an installation that invites viewers to produce their own music using color markers. Visitors draw along the curvy lines on the floor, and then the robots translate their marks into one-of-a-kind sound pieces.

The robots are called Color Chasers, and they associate each color that they find on their path with a sound. This small, unique orchestra features five different machines that each have their own sound and shape. The Basscar has a Dubstep-like sound, the Glitchcar reproduces computer-like sounds, and the Melodycar, Arpeggiocar, and the Drumcar to add rhythm.

This imaginative work was recently selected by the New York MoMA for their collection. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

Women Take To The Streets Wearing Menstrual Blood Stains

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Fed up with the shame surrounding their periods, the Spanish performance collective Sangre Menstrual took over the public streets in sets of white pants stained with menstrual blood. This performance artwork was politically motivated; as the group writes in their “Manifesto for the Visibility of the Period,” the taboo surrounding menstruation serves to oppress women and reinforce patriarchal systems.

By making a public display of their shedding uterine linings, the group hopes to reclaim the female body and free normal bodily functions from shame and judgement. Since the earliest books of the bible and before, menstruation has been viewed as unclean, and often women have even been kept separate from men during their periods. Sangre Menstrual, whose name literally translates to “menstrual blood,” intends to change all that. In their manifesto, the group of women write, “I stain [my pants], and it doesn’t make me sick. I stain [my pants] and I don’t find it disgusting.”

The implications of Sangre Menstrual’s street performance extend beyond menstruation and into larger debates surrounding reproduction and the female body. Like the feminist artist Barbara Kruger and her legendary print “Your Body Is A Battlefield,” the blood-stained performance aims to present the body as a political act of defiance. The manifesto states, “the visibility of the period [is meant] to increase the visibility of the body, as political space.” Do patriarchal, sexist institutions persist in part because of the repulsion with which we treat menstruation? Is this work of art a groundbreaking innovation or a silly shock tactic? (via BUST)