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Madrid’s Op-Art Christmas Lights

We all love the lights that pop up during the holiday season. Most of the time individuals and local city planners hang the standard lights that we’ve come accustom to or the occasional Santa Silhouette climbing down a chimney. However this holiday season the good folks of Madrids’ Barrio De Salamanca had the smarts to hire Architect Teresa Sapey to push the envelope of cheerful holiday lights. Instead of using the traditional holiday symbols that we’re used to seeing Sapey designed a series of concentric circles that overlap creating the trippiest holiday light display you’ve ever seen. The patterns overlap and become more intense the further you are with colors, patterns and shapes overlapping one another to create a spectacular and optically dazzling new take on a tradition that has been taking place for many decades. Happy holidays to all indeed! (via)

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Brent Owens Woodcarvings Walk The Line Between Art And Craft

Brent Owens - painting Brent Owens - painting Brent Owens - sculpture

Walking the line between fine art and craft, Brent Owens has a characteristic style of woodworking that he incorporates with a somewhat irreverent sense of humor and applies to a myriad of subjects.  Conspicuously hand-carved, embracing the flaws and all, Owens enhances his imperfect look by selecting wood with notable imperfections.  The casual woodwork is not a comment on Owens’ talents.  Rather it is done to emphasize the fact that the human hand has influenced the material.  Conceptually, Owens works from the notion that humans have a tendency to render nature amenable to their own agenda.  Describing this “healthy disrespect for nature” as a “shameless manipulation of a gorgeous natural material,” Owens considers his woodworking to be “imposing his own desires on the material” in the name of progressing culture.

Owens’ exploration of craft takes him in several directions.  His “Turkish rugs,” for instance, are carved freehand and modeled after Googled images.  These works are juxtaposed with carved paintings of appropriated text of medical queries and responses, which have been translated from Chinese to English.  The results are a mix of park signage and conceptual art exhibited as a confused mix of words that have lost the nuance of human translation.  The works becomes symbolic of how epically the human desire to understand and control everything so often fails.

Both funny and frightening Owens’ works are ultimately a representation of the fact that craft as fine art becomes a commentary on fine art itself.  Thereby becoming commentary on culture, and human nature at large.

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William Farges’ Rorschach-Like Inverted Nude Bodies

Inverted Nude Bodies Inverted Nude Bodies Inverted Nude Bodies farges6

French photographer William Farges‘ series “White Line” features surreal reflections of body angles, parts, and positions. Farges creates new shapes and figures by placing the reflections of nude bodies side by side, representing a continuity of form that is both startling and elegant. The series is, of course, named for the white line that dissects his diptychs – an element that emphasizes the new forms’ symmetry as a product of an inversion.  These forms reach and pull into each other, appearing as if each could disappear into the other. Farges’ images are Rorschach-like deconstructions that are smooth and round and contained. “White Line” is the result of another series of Farges that similarly deconstructs and reimagines the human form, “Chimera.” (via feature shoot)

Jesse Hazelip’s Sentimental Journey

Graffiti artist Jesse Hazelip tackles major social issues in his work.  Here are some of his pieces from the exhibition Sentimental Journey in which he reflects on WWII and our occupation in North America.  For those who are curious, the name Sentimental Journey comes from an actual bomber plane.

We Are In The Age of Wizards


One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.One year in 40 seconds from Eirik Solheim on Vimeo.

The fact that the minds eye can watch in rapid succession a forest turn from barren winterland to the growth of spring clearly means we have become Gods of The Earth. Anyways, happy New Year’s Eve! Watch the year pass in ways only Sorcerers have known.

Bars and Tones


Bars & Tones from André Chocron on Vimeo.Bars & Tones from André F. Chocron on Vimeo.
Kandinsky would have cried an abstract expressionist tear for this visual invocation of music.

Anders Krisar Creates Surreal Sculptures By Dissecting Bodies And Puting Them Back Together Again

Anders Krisár

Anders Krisár Anders Krisár Anders Krisár

Stockholm-based Anders Krisár is interested in exploring issues surrounding the human body.  Employing realistic casts of body parts Krisár then modifies them.  He imbues typical torsos, arms or faces with atypical assets and surreal qualities that are at once quiet and horrific, striking and bizarre.

Evoking a sense of how fragile the human body is, Krisár’s forms stir up feelings of discomfort.  Unnatural, ridiculous and sometimes even violent, the sculptures are so successfully disturbing because they are so meticulously executed. Rendered exactly and simply—skin looks like skin, body parts almost appear to be moving and breathing— Krisár’s works are convincing.  But at second glance there is always something distinctly wrong.  Torsos are freakishly imprinted, headless or morphed.  Bodies are severed, separated or broken. Krisár’s works thus become visual representations of the unfeasible.  This un-reality gives the pieces a psychological edge.

Beyond the challenge of confronting the bizarre so perfectly portrayed Krisár incorporates ideas of splitting, mirroring and twinning, which are frequent themes in psychoanalysis.  Erie yet captivating this psychological aspect gives Krisár’s work the ability to be emotional.  Though the work has a quiet quality, its effects are powerful.  A viewer’s sense of certainty is challenged and replaced with insecurity, question and an overall awareness that what we know only scratches the surface of what is possible.