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Li Hui’s Cage

The exhibition “CAGE” by Chinese artist Li Hui will be shown at the Ernst Schering Foundation’s Project Space on Unter den Linden. In his works, Li Hui creates unreal situations that have a dreamlike quality. In the exhibition room, the visitor is temporarily and randomly surrounded by a cage made of laser beams. Hui uses the cage, which encloses but does not harm the visitor, to explore individual boundaries and demonstrate how people are influenced by purely optical though physically irrelevant barriers. Visitors are confronted with both a liminal and a powerful visual aesthetic experience. The installation not only makes the visitor “inside the cage” examine his or her feelings, the “outside” observers, too, can watch the experiment and behavior of “those trapped inside.”

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Robert William Overweg’s Virtual photographs

Robert William Overweg's virtual photographs

Description of Robert William Overweg’s “Documenting Current Spaces” series:

I have been photographing virtual environments since the end of 2007.

I felt a need to document these worlds because I see them as the new public spaces. I was grasped by their perfect beauty, most of the time copying our own real world. But with constant highlights of beauty. These documentary photographs evolved into a journey of research and questioning.

Is there a difference between a photograph of a simulated object and a photograph of the object taken in real life. Another interesting question, when does popular culture leave the copyright protected arena and become public domain? Aren’t captured experiences instantly the property of the viewer/capturer?

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Zheng Lu’s Poetic Steel Splashes Of Water Frozen In Mid Air

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Metal splashes of water twirling around space. Chinese artist Zheng Lu is suspending his favorite element in the air. He is also imprinting calligraphy letters onto the body of the sculptures for an extraordinary result.

The artist uses a plaster base to carve the shape of the spatters. He laser-cuts the thousand letters on the stainless-steel metal and and heats up the whole structure. This process allows the metal to be distorted and the different parts to be assembled. The rendering are 3 dimensional large-scaled water splashes with intricate traditional calligraphy Chinese letters spread out onto the surface.

Zheng Lu has been fascinated with water explosion since little. And he was introduced during his upbringing to the art of calligraphy. He has been nourishing his passions through his art since he was able to make art.
The spatters are extremely detailed. From the voluptuous circular shapes to the micro drops of water, the artist depicts water as close to reality as possible. The sculptures can either be suspended or laid on the floor.

The artist’s pieces are esthetically beautiful. They also are telling a story. The letters he is depicting onto the sculptures are texts inspired by literature and poems. The world of art of Zheng Lu is synonym of harmony. It’s a world where movement and stillness are contrasting concepts yet one cannot survive without the other.

Zheng Lu’s pieces were recently displayed at the Sundaram Tagore Gallery in New York. (Via Fubiz).

Photographer Khalik Allah Captures The Ups And Downs Of Nightlife In Harlem, From Smiles To Struggles

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Photographer and videographer Khalik Allah has been shooting candid photos on the streets of Harlem since 2012. Having developed a relationship of trust with those in the neighborhood he frequents, his photographs reveal, softly, but emphatically, a side of city life that is struggling and raw. Allah ventures into the night alone, with his camera and a few rolls of film, and through him we meet those he crosses along the way.

There is such a fine line, in photographing marginalized communities, between documentation and exploitation. When is the camera no longer communicating a reality and instead romanticizing the hardships? When has our empathy, or humanity, turned to voyeurism? Although addiction and poverty are notable characters in Allah’s photographs, they manage to refrain from becoming the central focal point, and his work extends itself with just as much heart as it does grit. Allah muses on his website about this very topic:

“I feel it’s impossible for any photographer to maintain objectivity. The photographer always has a literal point of view, camera choice, light choice, and many other choices; by default these choices will always make it a subjective form. Subjectivity doesn’t diminish the power a photograph may contain.”

Allah walks the line with a conscientious sort of fragility, and has catalogued a selection of work that shows darkness as well as light. There is a light that remains, and sometimes shines out. Allah has crept close enough to show us the souls through the eyes, in case we forgot to look for ourselves. (Excerpt from Source)

Jonathan Brand

Jonathan Brand’s sculptures are inspired by his personal experiences and memories where he takes real events/situations in his life and uses it as a departure point for his imaginative projects. Read about his various projects after the jump.

Abstraction And Figuration Merge In Erik Jones’ Paintings

The disparate worlds of abstraction and figuration collide in the boldly colored paintings of Erik Jones. If those polar opposites weren’t enough Jones also tosses into the mix a healthy dose of organic and geometric mark making, creating explosive meditations on the human figure that at once feel analog and digital. (via)

Skwak Feed Me Pillow

This rad pillow featuring artwork by Skwak just his our shop. It’s covered in hungry lil dudes going nuts. Feed the need of your couch, bed, and chairs with the Skwak pillow.

P.s. If you’re into Skwaks work you might also want to get Issue: J which features our exclusive article and cover art by one France’s very best illustrators!

Peregrine Church’s “Rainworks” Reveals Clever Street Art Only When The Ground Is Wet

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Artist Peregrine Church creates a special brand of street art. Instead of wild colors and sprawling compositions, you can only see his handiwork when the ground is wet. Otherwise, his clever paintings are invisible. Church calls these pieces Rainworks, and it’s part of an ongoing series of over 25.

A quick demonstration shows just how inconspicuous Church’s works are. A dry sidewalk reveals nothing, but as soon as a bucket of water is poured on it – magic. The secret is hydrophilic chemicals. Once they’re activated, the clandestine designs reveal uplifting messages, hopscotch, and funny sayings. They last anywhere from four months to a year. (Via The Creator’s Project)