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Clément Guegan’s Surreal Portraiture Explores Nightmares And The Loss Of Identity

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Clément Guegan is a Montréal-based photographer and filmmaker from Paris. His works are dark and conceptual, exploring nightmares and states of alienation. Interested in the loss of control, he depicts characters who are struggling within the remains of identity; their faces are always turned away or obscured, putting the viewer’s focus on their bleak surroundings. In some photos, people fall from the sky, and in others, the camera follows them as they walk through graveyards and down empty mountain roads. There is a sense you are being guided through a surreal world with no certainty (or even sense) of where you’re going.

Existential voids aside, there is a beauty that arrives through the fearlessness of Guegan’s work. He is not afraid to unravel identity and reality by exploring existence as a strange wandering. At the same time, the stillness he conveys is inspiring, and the mystery is provoking. His characters (when they aren’t plummeting from the clouds) seem brave going into the unknown, even though they merely represent the physical remnants of the self. In this way, Geugan’s images make meaning where meaning seems to have been stripped away.

On January 1st, 2015, Guegan started a 365 Day Project, which means he posted a picture every day of the year. The project is almost at a close, but the results are impressive, blending portraiture with his unique surrealist style. Some of the photos from the challenge are featured here, and you can see a bigger selection on his website. He also has a Tumblr and Flickr to check out.

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Justine Reyes

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On a recent visit to The Center for Photography in Woodstock, New York I had the pleasure of viewing the works of Justine Reyes. A series entitled Vanitas included photographs reflecting old Dutch still lifes in a similar vain but with a most sharp and contemporary air that was both refreshing and humorous.

Marcus DeSieno’s Beautiful and Terrifying Photos Of Microscopic Parasites

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It is fair to assume that while most of us know that our world, our living spaces, and even our bodies are covered with microscopic organisms, we do like to not be reminded of it. Photography student Marcus DeSieno’s recent photoseries begs to differ, offering a beautiful yet disturbingly close look at our microscopic natural surroundings. Parasites is an ongoing project “investigating a history of scientific exploration through images of parasitic animals.” Taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope and then exposed onto dry plate gelatin ferrotype plates, a process which combines classical and cutting-edge photographic techniques. The final images are archival pigment prints from the scanned ferrotype plates and printed larger for these abject animals to confront the viewer at a one-on-one scale.

“Photography and science have had an intrinsic relationship since its’ invention in 1839. It did not take William Henry Fox Talbot long until he was using his calotype process to capture what was under the lens of his microscope. The indexical nature of photography has pushed the reaches of science ever forward into the 21st century. These technologies allow us to peer in to the unexamined corners of the natural world reminding us that the universe around us is much greater than ourselves. In this realm of scientific curiosity, photography has a intriguing relationship with the invisible, allowing us to see the world that we cannot. Parasites explores these themes of science and wonder and, at the same time, confronts a personal fear of these parasitic organisms that attach themselves to humans. Embedded in the work is an engaging dialog with photographic history, its\’ shifting modes of representation, and its’ material possibilities. Parasites investigates the role of shifting photographic technologies in contemporary culture and their abilities to capture a mysterious and unseen world.”

Ginette Lapalme

Ginette Lapalme makes awesome illustration work about animals, animals loving animals, animal loving humans, and humans that remind me of animals.

James Blagden

James Blagden

Brooklyn artist James Blagden isn’t worried about offending you with racial stereotypes. Or rather the aim is to offend to get the point across. Fusing together a myriad of influences and topics found in African American popular culture, the artist pokes fun at the ideas and images we accept on a regular broadcasted basis. Whatever the common conception, the nerdiness of Asians in mainstream cinema, African Americans and basketball, gold teeth and bling, he’s done it all. Check out an interview Format Mag did on James.

Edrem

Edrem, (merde backwards), is a collaborative sketchblog from three French/Belgian  designer-illustrators: Sébastien PaquereauDavid Zazurca, and Steven Burke. The concept of the  project, as is instantly evident to the viewer, is based in achieving volume. Paquereau, Zazurca, and Burke just want to get as many whimsical, stream-of-consciousness graphics out into the world as possible. In Burke’s words:

“We like not to say who we are when we talk about Edrem, because this is not the point of the blog. We try to get…massive numbers of experimentations and funny things [onto the blog], but we don’t care if the drawing is well done or not, it just has to be understandable…”

We all have a tendency to get heavily involved in our various projects, exerting microscopic levels of control on our output. Edrem reminds us that pulling off the reigns a little bit can yield many fruitful results. The Edrem crew staged an exhibition in Spring of 2010 at Michard Ardillier in Bordeaux entitled, “La Palissade”.

Nate Turbow’s Special Brand of Mediocrity

Nate Turbow‘s drawings are released every few days via his blog and Tumblr. Each “cartoon joke” feels raw, off-the-cuff and honest. The blog format works well for the quick, one-off style of each cartoon as the post titles often act as captions.

The resulting collection is an acute sense of bumming through life — being both painfully aware one’s mediocrity and simultaneously not giving a shit.

NSFW if cartoon boobs are forbidden in your place of work.