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Photographs of Miniature Plastic People Interacting with the Nude Figure

 

Maybe a little exploitative but well done nevertheless, these shots from photographer Allan Teger are done in single exposures. Natural, bodily curves take the place of hilly landscapes as miniature  “people” go about their business perfectly naturally. A nice way to celebrate the human form through re-contextualization, or just pretty shots of naked people- what do you think? Whenever I see these little plastic guys being used in such a way, I always think of Slinkachu’s “Little People Project”. I guess this is a common thing now. But Teger’s been doing it for a while. (via)

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Miami Project 2013 Highlights

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Kate Clark’s half-human, half-animal sculpture

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Vanessa German’s Doll sculptures

Miami Project, one of the biggest fairs in the Wynwood district this year, celebrates some of the most sought after artists this year. Most importantly though, as Jillian Steinhauer brings to light in her article ‘The Women of Miami Project’, most of the impressive works here were created by women. Consequently,  most of my favorite works in this fair were created by women too!

Here are some of the highlights at the Miami Project art fair:

Brooklyn based artist Kate Clark creates sculptures that are a lifelike fusion of a human and an animal. The surreal object, almost human-sized, investigates which characteristics separate us within the animal kingdom, and more importantly, which ones unite us.

The unexpectedness of the human face on these animals also evokes curiosity. They are obviously reconstructed yet they are not monstrous, they are approachable, natural, calm, innocent, dignified. The facial features are believable and the skin, which is the animal’s skin, has been shaved to reveal porous and oily features that we recognize as our own. The viewer has an intimate relationship with the face and then identifies with the animal, acknowledging the animalistic inheritance within the human condition.

Vanessa German, a multidisciplinary artist [sculptor, photographer, painter, actress, poet] and advocate for the black female experience,  creates these female figures that are made out of plaster, wood, glue, tar and found objects: hair, shells, old jewelry. They each represent aspects of female experience, power, and her cultural heritage.

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Clever Street Artist Uses A Cement Truck’s Spinning Mixer To Create Striped Painting

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Italian artist Mimmo Rubino, also known as Rub Kandy, plays with the city.  His art’s relationship with the city and its citizens is interactive, even fun.  His newest project is simple but imaginative.  Rubino uses an urban mainstay as a canvas for his spray paint work: a cement truck.  While the mixer spins, Rubino keeps a spraying can of paint steady.  Repeating the process with various colors eventually covers the mixer in near perfect stripes.  Appropriately, the piece is titled Revolver.

Tran Nguyen

Born in Vietnam but raised in the USA, illustrator Tran Nguyen earned her BFA from Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) in 2009. Fascinated with the human psyche and interested in the psychologically therapeutic potential of art, Nguyen’s creations are often surreal, dream-like scenes. Sometimes tree stumps have eyes, twigs grow through ear canals, and miniature figures live in the folds of a gown. Besides being visually arresting, often the titles of her works are quite intriguing as well — for instance, “I Came Across a Wilting Cognition” (seen above), “We Vomit Carcasses of Unattended Thoughts,” and “Living Parallel To an Infectious Pigment,” to select a few.

Nathalie Miebach

Nathalie Miebach’s works brings together science and art by using meteorological and oceanic data as a launching pad for her sculptures, installations, and wall works.

Adrienne Allebe’s Morphing Enviornment

 

Adrienne Allebe’s exquisite drawings are a visual manifestation of the events happing in our enviornment. Renderings of microscopic organisms morph, blend, and sit atop imagery of man-made objects. Endangered and threatened animals and environments are drawn and painted so that they appear to transform, disappear and reappear in order to reinforce the tenuous condition of their existence. And forms appear to float in and out of focus, sometimes peacefully, sometimes violently, evoking the uneasy merging of human industry and technology with natural ecosystems.

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