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Estelle Hanania

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French born and Paris based photographer Estelle Hanania is obviously interested in ritualistic worship and folklore culture. Find more of her work at FAT Galerie.

 

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Illustrator Stefan Glerum Gives A Contemporary And Pop Take On The Ancient Art Of The Stained Glass

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Stefan Glerum is a Dutch artist known for his playful and eye-popping illustrations. He spent four years studying illustration at Academy St. Joost and also worked as an assistant to Joost Swarte, a celebrated comic book artist. His work is characterized by clownish figures engaged in various dynamic acts. Described as “a melting pot of illustration heritage,” Glerum’s style draws on the Art Deco, Russian Constructivist, Italian Futurist, and Bauhaus movements, infusing this creative mash-up with popular themes (Source).

Recently, on the wall of a housing complex in Amsterdam, Glerum designed a massive and unique work of site-based art: two stained glass windows installed on a housing complex that depict a cartoonish collage of the location’s history. Located on the front and back of the building, each window is 60 feet high. Heren 5 Architects built the complex, and Atelier Schmit fabricated the stained glass. The AFK supported the completion of this project.

The longer you look at this stunning work, the more you’ll unravel about the surrounding location. First and foremost, the windows are aligned like a chimneystack, referring to a Oostergasfabriek (a nineteenth-century gas factory) that once stood out in that area of Amsterdam. Following the abandonment of the factory at the beginning of the twentieth century, the area hosted other industrial and public spaces. The front window shows a swimming pool, an animal shelter, and the Don Bosco School; the back depicts a public bathing room for factory workers, the laboratory of Professor Ernst Laqueur, and musicians of the Red Fanfare who formerly rehearsed there. You can read a more thorough description of each window on Glerum’s website, and there is a video about the construction here.

What makes the windows so spectacular is the artist’s seamless combination of historical periods and human environments. From military maneuvers to the coal industry to animal care, his loony figures crash together in a time-transcending and spirited symphony. Glerum’s art is not unknown to B/D; he is included in our Book 7: Class Clowns, and even designed the cover art. If you enjoy Glerum’s work—and, furthermore, are curious about artists who use similar styles of humor to engage and challenge us—you can purchase a copy of Book 7 on our shop page. Limited copies are still available.

Rinus Van de Velde

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Rinus Van de Velde’s virtuoso charcoal drawings are eye-catching, to say the least.  I hate to use a sports metaphor, but this is the charcoal equivalent of “nothing but net.”  Van de Velde is a finalist for the Sovereign European Art Prize, and has a show opening in Nuremburg at the Instituts Für Moderne Kunst on June 19th.  All images are courtesy of Galerie Zink.

Lee Gainer’s True Beauty

Lee Gainer attempts to question what we all constantly question ourselves, and that is true beauty. What is true beauty? Are they the faces we are asked to notice on billboards, TV, postcards, magazines, etc? Is it something we can buy and physically manipulate ourselves for? In her series, Frankenlovely, Lee Gainer asks us to observe the faces that have been advertised as “true beauty,” and reflect.

ALLDAYEVERYDAY’s Custom Jacket Art Show Collides Art, Fashion And Music

“Distressed, destroyed, or embellished, it’s the chosen fashion of outlaws, punks, rebels and bikers. To them, a jacket is an identity, a medium to express loyalty, acceptance, love, hate, rejection, freedom and nonconformity. In most cases, one can easily identify the rebellious type by their jacket alone. More specifically, members within their respective communities recognize the significance of various colors and patches as marks of rank and origin or acts of violence committed on behalf of the club. In punk subculture, even the chosen type of spike or stud adornment has a specific connotation. Because of its inherent mobility, potential for variety and badass undertone, the jacket is an art form like no other.

To introduce its new space, an incubator for creativity, ALLDAYEVERYDAY will present a selection of unique jackets, as customized by talents from the colliding worlds of art, fashion and music.” – ALLDAYEVERYDAY

Their show opens this saturday (the 27th) in New York. Wach the commercial for their show after the jump, sounds great!

Ai Weiwei Throws Paint All Over His Friends Wearing Expensive Designer Clothes

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Jacquemus

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer KTZ

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Phoebe English

Ai Weiwei photograph - Designer Proper Gang

Ai Weiwei is causing a stir once again. This time his project involves 14 outfits from 14 different designers, left over paint, a custom built pedestal, his friends, a camera and a rebellious streak. Asked by V magazine to be involved in this special collaborative series in conjunction with Comme des Garçons, Weiwei was sent a box of the designers one-off creations and was allowed free reign to create an editorial campaign for the magazine. He proceeded to dowse his friends and colleagues wearing the clothes with the paint he had accumulated from his earlier 2006/2008 Colored Vases project.

Following his anarchic philosophy and approach to art, Weiwei throws colors all over the delicate and expensive outfits with abandon, just like he did in his vase series. He continues to destroy the hierarchies we have come to accept (this time those of the fashion world, and how to represent clothing as a commodity). Not one to stick to the rules or to adhere to people’s expectations, Weiwei arguably destroys the original craftsmanship of these outfits – many of which took large teams of skilled tailors days to finish. The results have had mixed reviews. One of the designers, Shaun Samson (who had lilac paint splashed all over his plaid ensemble) shares his thoughts:

I don’t know if it’s sad or positive that he decided to do the project this way, but the outcome is beautiful. (Source)

Some may say Weiwei has destroyed others’ works of art, but the controversial artist sees it very differently:

Pouring a color on an outfit creates a new condition for the design. It creates a midpoint between two conflicting ideas. Gravity and the shape of the clothes combine to create a unique moment. Using these cultural products as ready-mades celebrates and reinterprets the intention of creativity. I think this act shows my respect toward their creativity. (Source)

(Via Hyperallergic)

Cinta Vidal Agullo’s Surreal Paintings Of Maze-Like Everyday Scenes

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Cinta Vidal Agulló‘s paintings depict a topsy turvy yet mundane world. There’s a dream-like quality to her work, like Alice falling down the rabbit hole and remarking on the various jars of marmalade. With a background in painting backdrops for the theater, Agullo excels and creating immersive worlds that, though they have an M.C. Escher-esque sense of physics, seem like they are a part of real life.
In an interview with Hi-Fructose, Agullo says:
With these un-gravity constructions, I want to show that we live in one world, but we live in it in very different ways – playing with everyday objects and spaces, placed in impossible ways to express that many times, the inner dimension of each one of us does not match the mental structures of those around us. The architectural spaces and day-to-day objects are part of a metaphor of how difficult it is to fit everything that shapes our daily space: our relationships, work, ambitions, and dreams.”
Agullo’s paintings are lushly illustrated like one of Graeme Base’s children’s books, almost playful in the way they explore the spatial and emotional connections between the tiny figures that inhabit them. Though they are definitely surreal, we’re invited to imagine how the different parts of each painting might fit together, like the puzzle pieces of our everyday lives.
What are the relationships between the people in her paintings? We can’t tell for certain, but it’s clear that the orbit around each other or, at the very least, they are neighbors in the same world — if not the same reality. (via Hi-Fructose)