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Marnie Weber

Marnie Weber’s unique cut’n’paste world is one where demure rabbit-headed women are the norm and fairytales are tinged with dark, sinister undertones…

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carmens place

Samantha Casolaris photo series depicts teenage sanctuary in New York. “The story regards a group of teenagers transvestites and transexuals who live  in a house managed by a priest, in Astoria, Queens.

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Jason Redwood- from start to finish!


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I was talking with Jason Redwood a few weeks ago, checking out some process shots of a new painting he’s working on  (titled fathomless psychotropicali), and realized it’d be kind of cool to do a blog post on the progression of the painting, from start to finish. So, Jason snapped a few pics from different stages of the painting being completed- kinda cool! The entire series is below. 

 

Helmut Stallaerts

Helmut Stallaerts

Belgian photographer Helmut Stallaerts transforms the mundane by selecting just one lonely specimen of out of the masses, turning it into his subject.

Haunting Photographs Of Abandoned Toy Factories

Abandoned Toy Factories

Via Bosure

Abandoned Toy Factory

Isla de las Munecas, or the Island of the Dolls

Photographs of abandoned toy factories are haunting. Taken by various photographers around the world, we see what’s happened after production has stopped and employees stop showing up to work. Some places are left in mid-production, while others have been ransacked by graffiti. In other places, they were defeated by nature.

Illustrating a range of factory conditions, the most unnerving photos are ones that depict these places as ghost towns. They feature cracked doll heads, broken doll arms, and soiled teddy bears. There is an air of mystery about them, and beg the question of, “what happened?” Why did they suddenly pick and leave?

What makes these photographs unnerving is the juxtaposition of toys and abandonment. We think of things like dolls and bears as being innocent. They signify childhood, a time in our lives that shouldn’t be so dark. Instead, we see toys having to face harsh realities of time, wind, snow, and more. Nothing depicts this better than the Isla de las Munecas, or the Island of the Dolls (above). While actually a floating garden, this space of land is occupied by several hundred dolls that have severed heads, limbless bodies and with empty eye-sockets. It was originally conceived as a memorial for a girl that was drowned in a canal, but has since fallen in disrepair. (Via io9)

Crafty Crows Build Nests Out of Stolen Coat Hangers

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Here at Beautiful/Decay, we don’t limit our features to art and design created by the human species. In large cities like Tokyo where there are few trees, birds may find it hard to come by nesting materials. Because of this lack, crafty crows have begun to use wire coat hangers to build their abodes, stealing them from nearby apartments. Crows’ nests are typically composed of interlocking twigs and some wire to create a sturdy structure for the birds’ eggs so it’s not hard to understand how hangers could be deemed appropriate materials by the crows. These wiry nests appear sculptural in their construction, their placements among tree branches marking a stark contrast between the natural and man-made. Crows are intelligent creatures and have been known to recognize human faces, bend wires into hooks in order reach food, crack open walnuts by dropping them from a height, and even memorize garbage truck schedules in order to track down food supplies. (via amusing planet)

Brad Spencer Uses Bricks For More Than Building

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Brad Spencer doesn’t just build things out of bricks, he also sculpts them into existence. Much of his work is large-scale and features human figures or elements that appear to emerge naturally and seamlessly from this solid medium. Bricks are normally used architecturally to build structures with 90 degree angles. Spencer challenges this conception by creating fluid shapes from this recognizable form. He uses a relief technique – starting with unfired clay, he sculpts the walls and figures into a brickwork pattern. He then fires the pieces separately, and assembles the entire piece on the day it’s set to display. Spencer says,

“Brick sculpture can be dated back to ancient Babylon but remains a fresh and interesting enhancement to any building, wall or environment.

Projects may include bas (low) relief, high relief, full dimension free standing and often a combination. The brick medium has all the same characteristics of durability and low maintenance as a brick building, blends well in settings where other brick construction is present, looks good with landscaping and has a familiarity which is comforting to people. Brick sculpture adds intrigue and interest to a commonly understood material as viewers try to figure out the techniques by which it was created.” (via my modern met)

Allison Healy’s Intricate Watercolor Illustrations

I am an avid admirer of Allison Healy‘s illustrations.  She is an illustrator based out of Boston, Mass.  Her work strikes me as the colors are rich and vibrant possibly implying   digital coloring but I know for a fact she uses watercolor and only watercolor.  I find this refreshing in the mass digital illustration age.  Check more of her intricate works out after the jump.