Get Social:

Jerry Kearns – New Work

Jerry Kearns’ new work meditates on the construction of images post-9/11. The stark blue sky found in all of the paintings sets the mood as surreal and stands in for the strange blue sky behind the Twin Towers after the attack. Kearns explores various ways of representing the present body by subverting notions of masculinity and strength with both feminine and androgynous signifiers.

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Barry Stone

Barry Stone keeps things simple and precise with geometric abstract collages. Barry also has some video work on his site that’s worth a peak.

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Intriguing Photographs Of Porn Sets Without The Porn

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As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing the work of Elizabeth Moran.

San Francisco-based photographer Elizabeth Moran provides quite an interesting look at space and context in this ongoing series. One can’t help but enjoy the irony captured in the lack of action in these spaces that normally get so much.

The Armory documents the ever-changing sets of the pornography company Private spaces are constructed for a public gaze and appear both familiar and strangely foreign. Devoid of people, the spaces allude to an activity, but leave the viewer to imagine the scene. was founded in 1997 by Peter Acworth while he was pursuing his PhD in finance at Columbia University. Today,’s headquarters occupy the San Francisco Armory. Built by the United States National Guard in 1912, the Armory’s Drill Court became San Francisco’s primary sports venue for prizefights from the 1920s through 1940s. After falling into disrepair, the Armory was purchased by in 2006 and is now one of the largest adult production studios in the world.—Elizabeth Moran

Sarah Louise Davey’s Ceramic Sculptures Are Blended Human And Bird Freaks Illustrating The Reality Of Our Lives

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Half humans, half birds; Sarah Louise Davey’s ceramic sculptures are the symbol of emotional duality. She is blending a woman’s face with a beak and a feathered gaze. The eyes seem so real, they are preventing us from looking away. Insisting that we come closer and try to understand the meaning of it all. The other sculptures are hanging from leather cords and chains. Two arms ending with birds’ feet with rose metal claws. The arms and the faces are covered in wrinkles, leaving us wondering how old these creatures are, and if this is what will happen to us too. It will, in the artist’s imagination.

Looking at the sculptures, it feel like we’re entering the world of the wizard of oz meets the barnyard, fantasy meets reality. Isn’t it what we’re living daily? If we think about it, the result is far from being pretty and perhaps this is Sarah Louise Davey’s purpose. In order to reflect deeper on society, norms and beauty we need to stretch the limits of our understanding. When the artist exhibits those pieces, she is almost questioning if we, as individuals are not all freaks after all. Freaks that need to be analyzed and understood, because underneath the wrinkled skin and the animal features we each have a complicated unique soul giving us an infinity of possibilities. ‘At the heart of these works is the eternal push and pull of the spirit’.

Sarah Louise Davey is represented by Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia. (via Sweet Station)

Newspaper Headlines Replaced With User Comments Reveals Dark Public Opinions

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Twitter user @TechnicallyRon has spent a fair amount of time creating clever and humorous graphics for his very active account. His recent experiments with taking the format from the Daily Mail (a tabloid-format UK gossip paper) and replacing the newspaper headlines with actual user comments might fall more into a category more darkly revealing than humorous.

While some of the comments veer towards inane internet message board chatter (example, “I don’t know which Kardashian this is.”), the results often head to darker opinions that are better left unsaid, hence their prevalence behind the safety of computer screens (such as the misogynistic comments about women over 50, below).

As this story is still developing, @TechnicallyRon has not made any opinions public about these works, or if the series will continue. (via thepoke).

*Edit. This idea did however lead to web and interactive designer Richard Westenra to create a tool which anyone can use to easily add these comments to headlines (the results of which can be seen at the bottom of the post).

Video Watch: Fashion Designer Jeff Staple Interviews Jose Parla

A little over a week ago, we featured an interview between James Jean and Jeff Staple. This week, check out another vid of Staple stirring up some insightful chatter with a talented artist.

NYC artist Jose Parla is known for bringing the most subtle graff references to his abstract expressionist paintings. Tags and drips meld seamlessly with texture and scale in his atmospheric work, eschewing the familiar graffiti-aesthetic-as-gimmick-syndrome.

Full interview after the jump.

Bulgarian War Memorial Vandalized… And Never Looked So Damn Good!


According to Gawker‘s Seth Abramovitch a public monument to the Soviet Armed Forces in Sofia, Bulgaria was vandalized spectacularly over the weekend. The statues of the Second World War soldiers were painted to resemble such candy-colored figures of capitalist iconography as Superman, Ronald McDonald, Santa Claus, Captain America and The Joker. The spray-painted writing beneath it says the hack now puts the statue “in step with the times!”

Today, Bulgarian Minister of Culture Vezhdi Rashidov denounced the act as “vandalism…We are the only ones led by some kind of destructive force when it comes to monuments of socialism.” The kid in red on the skateboard just thinks it’s awesome. [sofiaecho.comphoto via AP]

Manuel de révolte au travail


The brilliant aspect about instructional illustrations is that they speak for themselves (don’t miss the story in its ordered entirety by clicking on Read More below). But if you’re further wondering what this little beauty was intended for, it comes to us thanks to Packard Jennings and the Centennial Society who describes this as a “small, sixteen-page pamphlet… produced to put inside the postage-paid, business-reply envelopes that come with junk mail offers. Every envelope collected is stuffed with the pamphlet and mailed back to its original company.” Feel like participating in some subtle revolts of your own? I would recommend checking out their participate link!