Get Social:

Made With Color Presents Kelley Hagemes Painting Inspired By The Divine

Kelley Hagemes Kelley Hagemes Kelley Hagemes

Beautiful/Decay is excited to bring you our exclusive artist feature in partnership with  Made With Color, the premiere platform for artist websites. Each week we join forces to bring you some of the most exciting creatives working today who use Made With Color to create their clean and sleek sites. All Made With Color sites not only work beautifully on your computer  but also come optimized for mobile and tablet users making sure that your portfolio looks professional no matter how you view it.  For this weeks artist spotlight we bring you the illustrations of Kelley Hagemes.

Savannah, Georgia based artist and illustrator Kelley Hagemes creates mixed media works that reference various religious and mythical iconography. Imagery of the sublime is mixed with rich symbolism of life, regret, death, and the unknown.I

When I was a kid I had to go to Catholic school for a period of time, and my parents made were quite the Catholics. I feel like I was always surrounded by these images of the Sublime, dripping with symbolism and encased in ornament. Images of things that were supposed to be beautiful but also strike some sort of fear or uneasiness in you.

More broadly Kelley’s work is about dealing with lifes demons, finding happiness after sadness, transformation and strength while having to find beauty in some pretty ugly places throughout the process.

Advertise here !!!

Gustaph Meulemans

74671_8366362_lGustaph Meulemans’ use of geomtric shapes and screenprint color quality make his work stand out against todays vibrant and explosive colors. 

Advertise here !!!

Artists And Designers Create Doll Houses For Charity Showing How Life Could Be Easier For Children With Special Needs

cathedralgrouparchitecture10 cathedralgrouparchitecture13 cathedralgrouparchitecture11

For Cathedral Group’s charity project, A Dolls’ House, 20 United Kingdom architects and designers designed a doll house in order to raise £100,000 for the children’s charity, KIDSDuggan Morris ArchitectsDexter MorenDRDH ArchitectsGlenn Howells ArchitectsHLM ArchitectsLifschutz Davidson SandilandsmaeRAAD StudioshedkmFATdRMMMake Architects, and Allford Hall Monaghan Morris are among the contributors to this project. Inspired by the over 1,500 artists who participated in Edwin Lutyens’ 1924 doll house for Queen Mary, Cathedral Group organized their own doll house project. Each doll house has to be constructed on a 750 square millimeter plith and include one feature that could make life easier for a child with special needs.

As expected, the designs run the gamut in terms of aesthetics; some of the house designs are serious and practical, while others are abstract and absurd. The doll houses were on exhibit during the London Design Festival last month and will be auctioned off in November at Bonham’s in London. (via de zeen)

David O’Keefe

DavidOkeefe

David O’Keefe’s clay sculptured caricatures are grotesquely accurate. There is a sliver of realistic figuration in their distortion that makes them strangely believable in their likeness. In particular the above image ruins my sincere affection for The Beatles, as they now look like horrible gremlins from a bad acid trip.

A Day In Decay: 1994-1997

barry mcgee twist 12oz. prophet magazine
1994-1997 were significant years in my life. I was stuck in the suburbs rotting away at a high school where nothing of interest ever happened. I spent my weekends riding the metro into D.C. to paint graffiti, go to hardcore shows, skateboard and generally cause mischief. (Remember that the internet was in its early stages, so finding a cool magazine that covered my interests was a rare feat.) 12 oz. Prophet was one of my main sources of inspiration. Primarily covering graffiti and what would eventually be called “street art,” 12 oz. was ahead of the curve. 12 oz. is still around, so if you need a graffiti fix check out their site. The issue pictured above featured a great interview with Twist (Barry Mcgee). Only a few of you know about this, but the name “Beautiful/Decay” actually comes from the last question in the interview: “Raven – You’re really into shit that’s all rundown and decaying, huh?” And Twist responded: “I love stuff that’s rundown, rusted, beautiful decay, a state of decay.” I didn’t start B/D immediately after reading the interview, but the phrase “Beautiful Decay” stuck in my head for weeks. Finally, after reading several ‘zines at shows and trying to find something meaningful to do with my time I decided to put the phrase to good use and start our humble lil ‘zine.

Donna Pinckley’s Photos Of Interracial Couples And The Negative Things That People Say To Them

Donna Pinckley - Photography  2_565x706Donna Pinckley - Photography  3_565x706Donna Pinckley - Photography  10_565x690Donna Pinckley - Photography  11_565x688

A black and white photograph of a couple expressing nothing but tenderness and love. Donna Pinckley captures interracial couple posing naturally in front of their homes. Nothing should be perceived as wrong in these pictures, yet some people are not only condemning these individuals’ relationships but they are throwing hateful words at them. These can be read below the photographs, “as a reminder of how part of society sees them”.

After taking photographs of young children growing up through life, becoming adults and posing with their spouses, Donna Pinckley encountered a recurrent situation where women got to reveal the loathing comments they were facing because of their partner’s race. Her reaction to these women’s confidence has been artistic. She began to photograph interracial couples and depict their resilience and refusal to let others define them.

The couple are of all ages, and they represent any individuals in any country at any given time. This cold harsh reality is however counterbalanced by the message of hope these couples are giving us, via the mean of photography and the presence of Donna Pinckley behind it. A singular and effective way to spread a notion of tolerance and acceptance.  Despite the words, the looks and the attitude towards those relationships, the love and trust created by these couples is bursting and undeniable.

Aaron Leif Nicholson

withdoctor head shot

Aaron Leif Nicholson has an affinity for creating life-sized sculptures of imposing characters (like witch doctors and Yetis) that seem to have stepped straight out of a nightmare. Nicholson’s “Coney Island Star Man” is a prime example: faceles and hunched over the ground, he lurks on a beach as if he’s watching you. Nicholson brings his sculptural background to other works as well, which include mixed-media drawings and paintings, lending traditionally two-dimensional art a three-dimensional quality.

Julian Melchiorri’s Incredible Light Sculpture Made From Silk Worm Proteins

Julian Melchiorri Julian MelchiorriJulian MelchiorriJulian Melchiorri

London based design engineer Julian Melchiorri has been inventing amazing things in the laboratory for a while now. The outcomes he produces are a beautiful mix between art and science, and are meant to solve urban problems in an environmentally focused way. His latest project Cocoon is a light sculpture consisting of a 3D printed shell, and proteins from worm silk, crafted into nanoprisms, which form the body of the sculpture. Illuminated from within by a single 1 Watt LED light, Cocoon is a wonderful example of refraction and reflections, and the understated beauty of light.

Melchiorri explains the science behind how we normally view light and how the silk worm protein breaks up rays differently.

Light is an electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in a range of 400 nanometers. Each section of this wavelength is perceived by us in colors from blue to green and red. When we look at a light emission we usually perceive a white source due to the smallness of its wavelength that unify all the colors. When a ray of light passing through the material gets diffracted by the nano-prisms, the light wavelength is sparse until its real composition is revealed. (Source)

Cocoon is a visual experiment combining different materials, technologies and shapes. It is an innovative way of challenging our perceptions and understanding of seemingly simple things around us, in this case, light. Melchiorri and his experiments are a perfect example of the parallels between art and science. The two different areas have the same curiosity, usually about the same phenomena, and are geared toward some type of improvement. You can see Melchiorri’s other visionary projects (Silk Leaf, and Exhale) here and a video of Cocoon after the jump. (Via My Amp Goes To 11)