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Precious Dioramas Built Inside Tiny Sardine Cans

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Packed within the four walls of a tiny 6 by 10 centimeter sardine can, the miniature characters created by sculptor Nathalie Alony for her project Home Sweet Home are both humorous and poignant. Arranged in a massive grid, the artist’s sardine can dioramas serve as a metaphor for the confined apartments in which we nest. These intricate figurines—men, women, children, beloved pets—each exist within the limits of their aluminum enclosure, building complex family and personal universes that seem to operate independently of the outside world. Despite the isolation of each piece, together Alony’s cans form a complex network that wakes and rests as a unified community, separated only by thin, delicate metal.

Like strange dollhouses, these precious sardine can apartments allow us to navigate and to find meaning in the rituals of domestic life. Much of the action portrayed here is banal: the routine laundering of children’s clothes, the checking off of days on a calendar, the painting of walls. When seen in miniature, intricately rendered by the artist’s masterful hands, mundane home improvement tasks become endlessly enthralling. Here, we can be voyeurs in the most innocent sense, entering the intimate confines of the homes of others with tender curiosity.

Alony’s brilliant little worlds capture the lonesomeness of modern living; seeing the fourth aluminum wall pulled back to reveal precious, private lives, we yearn for a similar intimacy in real life. A home, carved out lovingly from a tiny industrial box, contains all the secrets and wonders of families that are not our own. What goes on in the cherished homes of others? (via Junk Culture and Lost at E Minor)

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Discarded Old Books Turned Into Artworks Featuring Miniature Copper Paintings

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American artist Joseph Decamillis breaths second life to old discarded books by inserting miniature illuminated into their covers. Postage stamp-sized artworks are done on copper plates and placed in carved niches. Decamillis’ works turn two-dimensional book covers into exquisite spatial collages.

“As a painter of miniatures on copper, Joe found old books the perfect match to narrate and contain his exquisite illuminated images. <…> Carving niches into old books emphasized the storytelling nature of the work.”

Combining the inscribed meanings of a book with his whimsical paintings, Decamillis constructs new discourses between book cover’s inherent text, oil-painted imagery, carefully selected text additions and the viewer. To create his trademark miniatures, Decamillis uses brushes with no more than three hairs each. After finishing the piece, the book is sealed to never be opened again.

All books featured in the “Miniature Paintings In Altered Books” series are real, mostly found in libraries, bought at thrift store bargains or given by family and friends. In this project, Decamillis was able to unite his passion for books with self-taught skills of oil painting and collage. Artist claims to often research the books before altering to find potential monetary or historical value. (via Messy Nessy Chic)

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The Wildly Warped Sculptures of Jonty Hurwitz

Much of the work of Jonty Hurwitz plays with perspective.  This is perhaps most obvious in the art pictured here.  Hurwitz creates severely warped sculptures that are snapped back to shape in the reflection of a cylindrical mirror.  He does this by scanning objects, digitally manipulating them, and fabricating the digital models.  This explanation, though, is extremely simplistic.  On his process, Hurwitz says:

“I usually start by expressing a concept using mathematical tools, often involving billions of calculations and many months of preparation. I then explore ways to manifest these formulae in the physical world.” [via]

Pier Francesco Martini’s Painted Pixels

Pier Francesco Martini‘s digital self portraits are an interesting twist to one of the oldest practices in art.

Greg Eason

Greg Eason

 

Greg Eason of Norfolk, UK, has a hand for drawing very realistic pencil illustrations, to fantastic patterns and sketches that stretch and bend across his sketchbook page. There’s something very comforting in his illustrations, their lifelike feeling, and the vacant page that inhabits the characters of his pieces.

My current work explores the era Anthropocene, working primarily in pencil, and the focus of my current work is driven by the desire to push the physical limitations of scale. I am also interested in the unpredictable nature of pattern; my interest lies in the production of organic linear structures and the suggestion of fluidity through repeated marks.

 

Desire Obtain Cherish’s Sculptures Explore Our Obsession With Consumerism, Fame, And Luxury

DOC

DOC

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“Ideas win today in our society. […] I ingest, then digest. Art is really just a mirror of ourselves.”

A truthful quote that Desire Obtain Cherish  (DOC) aka Jonathan Paul takes into account while conceptualizing his body of work. The pop sculptor, obviously influenced by Jeff Koons and Andy Warhol, combines street, pop, conceptual and appropriation art in order to create sculptural pieces that explore contemporary society’s ever-growing obsessions:  sex, gender, drugs, commerce, media and fame.

Desire’s kitschy, yet critical work exposes “society’s inability to control itself as it examines the commercial promise of fulfillment and happiness that ends in dependency.” DOC employs an exaggerated and sarcastic outlook that might come off as cleaver but pretentious and judgmental, but never in a bad way. New Yorker art critic Benjamin Genocchio characterized DOC’s work as “not malicious [..] He is more like our social conscience, delivering up uncomfortable and unpleasant truths wrapped in the most beautiful and seductive of packages.”

Although a conventional artist in paper, DOC deviates from the stereotypical standards of “good taste” in art as his ideas are more in line with contemporary commerce and marketing methods rather than traditional artisan methods. (via ARTNAU)

Will Sweeney

WillSweeney1Will Sweeney’s illustrations are colorful and awesome, featuring trippy robots and vegetables playing arcade games amongst other chaos.

Will has a new show and an accompanying book available online called “As Above So Below” which runs at the Lazy Dog in Paris until May 8th.  Check out more of his work after the cut and at his website.

Big Day For Small Press wrap up!

I tried to post this a bit sooner but traveling kept me from fulfilling my blogging duties. Better late than never!

 

A Day For Small Press was a big success with hundreds of designers, artists, and USC college students coming out to support the various indie publishers.