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Arber’s vaguely surreal And bleakly erotic photographs

The mysterious photographer who simply goes by the name Arber and describes where he’s from as “the North”  creates vaguely surreal, bleakly erotic, darkly off-kilter images, pulling back a curtain to reveal a parallel world full of mystery, unsettling sexual blankness and enigmatic women. We sure wish we could get a last name and a real city from him but his work is so captivating that we gave him a pass.

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Brett Kern’s Ceramic Sculptures That Look Like Inflatable Toys

Brett Kern Brett Kern Brett Kern

Brett Kern sculpts these incredible “inflatable” dinosaurs and other objects out of plaster. Kern sculpts his own molds out of clay and uses glaze to emphasize his materials’ depth and details. Pop culture has always influenced Kern’s work, and these faux inflatable sculptures are no exception. One of Kern’s first memories as a child was being given an inflatable dinosaur at the hospital for behaving while his mother gave birth to his sister. It’s this playful, childlike wonder that informs the bulk of his work, and the forging of a balance of fragility and buoyancy. .

“I find that the mold-making process imitates, in a certain way, the fossilization process. Objects are covered in a material that captures their shape and texture and this, in turn, preserves the object as a rock-like representation. Movies, television, toys and games dominated the cultural landscape of my youth. I am a product of this specific time period, and I like to think of my artwork as the fossils that will help preserve it.”

You can purchase Kern’s work over at his Etsy shop. (via i09)

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Mind Blowing Real-Time CGI Transforms A Models Face Into A Futuristic Canvas


Nobumichi-Asai-Video-1  Nobumichi-Asai-Video-3

In his latest project OMOTE, Japanese producer Nobumichi Asai combines explicit real-time face tracking and projection mapping to create unbelievable transformations of a human face. While projecting computer generated imagery (CGI) onto buildings, room walls or cars isn’t new, using a live model as a dynamic canvas demonstrates an advances use of technology.

To accomplish such realistic and mesmerizing effect, Asai gathered a team of digital designers, CGI experts, and make-up artists. Together they created a set of digital “masks”, or, as Slash Gear referred to it, “electronic equivalent of makeup”. As shown in the video, model’s face should be scanned and mapped so the graphics can be projected and manipulated in real-time, even when the face moves around.

Despite that lots of technical details about OMOTE are left unsaid, Internet users have already started speculating on the possible use of such technology. Most suggestions include testing of products such as make-up, clothing, or even tattoos. Some state that advanced versions could be employed for medical purposes, like projecting X-Rays or creating “instant previews” of plastic surgery. Not to mention the game industry. (via Gizmodo)

Jonathan Andrew’s WW2 Bunkers

Jonathan Andrew‘s minimal photos of World War 2 bunkers are beautiful and disturbing all at once. These utilitarian structures meant to protect soldiers are reminders of both the horror of war and the innovation and advances in technology that conflicts bring on.

Roger Kelly


In the year 2237, after we’ve all been forced to move to the Moon, we will keep warm with these post-apocalyptic future quilts. That is, of course, assuming rumors are proven false and the moon isn’t really the Death Star. Anyway, thats my take on London based artist Roger Kelly’s work. His pieces are not just a random collection of abstract shapes, but on close inspection, fragments of buildings, rocks, and trees all stitched together to create Kelly’s overwhelming vision.

Photographer Giorgio Cravero’s Color-Seeping Fruits And Veggies Express The Pain And Perseverance Of Nature

Giorgio Cravero - Photography Giorgio Cravero - Photography Giorgio Cravero - Photography Giorgio Cravero - Photography

Giorgio Cravero is an Italian photographer who has combined food photography with social criticism, producing a series of surreal images that metaphorically explore environmental degradation and the perseverance of nature. The color seeping from each fruit and vegetable represents humankind’s brutal exploitation of natural resources, as our unsustainable practices seek to strip nature of its very essence. In a vampiric fashion, like lifeblood drained from a body, the fruits and veggies blacken where the color filters down. However, hope remains, as the top holds its pigment. As Cravero explains:

“Men are poison for the earth. […] Nature will outlive us: in the fruit and toxic vegetables, where color slides away, there’s the upper part which firmly holds the color of life. Do we really think that we can make a difference? Do we really think, in the age of technology, that we can lay down mankind’s law to the extent that we dominate the law of nature?” (Source)

At the core of Cravero’s series is a message about the inevitable pitfalls of human arrogance. As our technological capacities have increased, so has our pride, and so we manufacture our own destruction. “The blackened chicory, the abandoned carrots are the clear images that, okay, we needed a knife to tear the meat off our prey, therefore we are technical beings for survival,” he writes, explaining where the inflated sense of confidence and self-importance came from, “but Earth had also imposed on us to be humble.” Cravero maintains that, for us, this is a fatal type of arrogance, but nature itself will survive in some form. “Nature defeats us in silence, or in any case, it will stay here for longer than us, it will be run-down, but it will still be there. […] Nature doesn’t give a damn about our pain or our profit logic” (Source).

Visit Cravero’s website, Facebook page, and Behance to see more of his work. (Via Art Fucks Me)

Alicia Martín’s Cascading Book Installations

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín

Alicia Martín


Alicia Martín (formerly featured here – as well as in our Best of 2012) has kept busy this year, expanding on her signature style of cascading book installations that we first saw in BiografíasEach installation begins as a wire and aluminum structure, to which hundreds and thousands of books are attached, creating the illusion of waterfalls of pages and spines wrapping around objects, wrapping around themselves, and pouring from windows and underneath walls.

In works such as Singularidad, the Madrid, Spain-based artist focuses her waves of books into a more circular shape, resembling a vortex rather than a waterfall. Playing with the idea of a black-hole, or naked singularity, the collective swathe of books consumes itself, rather than bursting forward. In Contemporaneos, Martín plays with the idea of the books being the background, the support, or what’s behind the object, pouring out of (or cracking through) a wall – engaging in a dialogue with more indoor, site-specific contemporary installation. However, Martín continues to re-imagine her waterfalls, with newer pieces expanding on previous work’s pouring from buildings, as well as running down streets, through windows and around trees, with pages blowing in the wind at each amazing installation. (via mymodernmet)

Andrei D. Robu’s A typoholic

Andrei D. Robu’s design portfolio is filled to the brim with amazing typography. What’s impressive about his work is how easily he works in a wide variety of styles shifting from hand drawn cursive fonts inspired by tattoo art to experimental digital typefaces with ease.