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Custom Made Artist Rugs Raise Money For Children In Nepal

rug design by CHAMO

  Marcroy, the director of People of Print who has been featured with us before here, joined the Made By Node team (a non-profit social business) back in April 2012 to help curate and organize a collection of 18 designers from across the globe.  Each artist created their own graphic for a signature one of a kind rug design which was then crafted into a fair trade carpet, limited to an edition of 10 per artist.  ALL of the proceeds from the rug sales go to support a school of 260 children and an orphanage of nineteen in Nepal.  Each rug is hand crafted by Kumbeshwar rug makers and each employee is taught literacy and skills in addition to fair wages.   The project already has been receiving some notable recognition from Creative Review, and Telegraph’s editor for Tent London.  Made by Node will be selling the rugs and exhibiting them alongside Pecha Kucha talks during Fairtrade Fortnight in 2013.

Marcroy continued on to tell me that “the scope for future projects with Node is almost infinite.  We are looking to keep the snowball rolling and get more people involved with this amazing project.  People can also start getting their own designs crafted at a fee.”
Here is the list of the 18 artists that contributed a design for this beneficial community project:

Donna WilsonBeatrice Alemagna , Sanna AnnukkaPetra Borner , Chamo , Benji Davies , Chris Haughton , Clayton Junior , Lesley Barnes , Jon Klassen , Micah Lidberg , Joe Magee , Geoff McFetridge , Neasden Control Centre , Patternity , Serge Seidlitz , Marcroy Smith , Kevin Waldron

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Art Legend Mike Kelley Dies


One of the most iconic artists of our time Mike Kelley passed away today at the age of 58. With over four decades of activity within the international art world spanning dozens dozens of museum shows, several art noise bands, and multiple Whitney Biennial inclusions,  Kelley will be sorely missed by the art community. Watch an interview with Kelley about his work after the jump.

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Paul Yore’s Joyful Sexual Tapestries Provokes And Shocks To The Point Of Censorship

Paul Yore - Illustrations 2
fuck the police

everything is fucked

Paul Yore - Illustrations 12

The world of Paul Yore is encrypted. Behind the simplistic images hand woven on his tapestries there is a subtle will to provoke our thoughts on gender, identity, consumerism and daily violence. The artist chooses to apply psychedelic vivid colors to ultra detailed illustrations : phalluses shooting out rainbows, youths riding white unicorns, skulls conversing with pigeons, and pigs dressed up as police officers. He designs a whole lot of messages in his work, whether it’s tapestries or large installations made out of an accumulation of toys found on the streets. (One of his last pieces, “Everything is fucked”,  was removed from his last show, allegedly representing child sex abuse, see the very two last pictures below).

Paul Yore is protesting in his own way by impregnating the culture of excess on his overflowing tapestries. We are immersed within his dystopia, his family of masturbating characters, naked flying humanized butterflies and cheerful animated vanities. This joyful scenario hides his honest concerns about real debates. The actual consequences of social and cultural nonsense in our existence is a primordial topic. In a world where communicating is done through all kinds of ways, he doesn’t seem to have the freedom he needs to express his ideas. Censorship versus artistic freedom between the artist and the authorities is the culminant point this battle has reached.

Paul Yore’s work will be shown at the Museum of contemporary Art in Australia as part of the Primavera 2015: young Australian artists until december 2015. (via Juxtapoz)

Peter Nitsch

Shophouses - 4 x 8 m Bangkok

Peter Nitsch’s latest photographic series, “Shophouses,” documents Nitsch’s trip to Bangkok, where he became fascinated with the way in which many Southeast Asian city dwellers live; combining their work and living spaces. In this project, Nitsch explored the diverse cultural and social mix of a rapidly urbanizing Thailand, in order to uncover the basic human qualities that connect his subjects to his work’s viewers.


Aidan Koch, a comics writer and illustrator who’s previously been featured on Beautiful/Decay, has started a new blog entitled Field Studies to help fund an extended period of traveling. Koch, who hails from Portland, Oregon, is drawing intriguing sights she encounters during her travels – often depicting local flora, or a recurring pup named Edie – and selling each original piece for $20 through PayPal. The payments go back into Koch’s travels, thus generating even more field studies.

The studies themselves manage to come off as both timeless observations and, with the focus on plants, for instance, articulations of the zeitgeist. They are austere without being restrained and composed without being constrained. Most usefully, they serve as visual inlets to her larger body of artwork. For those not already familiar with Koch’s comics and styles of drawing, a good place to start is her comic book The Whale published by Gaze Books.

As part of her season of traveling, Koch will be the artist-in-residence at Skylab Gallery in Columbus, Ohio, during the month of June. As there is a lot of America in-between Portland and Columbus, I suggest checking out Koch’s drawings that are after the jump, then finding one that suits your daily décor needs on her site.

Andrés Medina

Most of Andrés Medina‘s photographs are of places and things we might overlook or have forgotten about.

San Francisco Gallery Alter Space’s Exhibit Of Artistic Fleeting Moments

Jason Jägel

Jason Jägel

Derek Albeck

Derek Albeck

Carlos Donjuan

Carlos Donjuan

Rachell Sumpter

Rachell Sumpter

Everyone’s Time Is Their Own is the latest project by curator Gabe Scott.  The exhibition title is borrowed from the curator’s grandmother, who held it as her philosophical way to life and death. Each of the artists encompass in their work something deeply spiritual, contemplative in the exploration of their practice as well as the surrounding world.

The works selected are representative of the fleeting moments in life that are permeated by a sense of musicality or lux. Depictions of figures play a prominent role throughout the exhibition, often appearing solitary or faceless, disconnected and searching. Body and soul are paradigms that often find themselves at odds in discourse. Individuals die alone but they take a part of their loved ones with them, this leaves the bereaved musing interconnectivity, lonesomeness, and the vast possibilities associated with continuity. Life and death cannot be bottled up, instead remembered through the slow turning lens of nostalgia.

Everyone’s Time Is Their Own is on view at Alter Space until February 22nd and includes works by Alejandro Diaz-Ayala, Carlos Donjuan, Clynton Lowry, Derek Albeck, Derrick Velasquez, Grady Gordon, Jacob Magraw-Mickelson, Jason Jagel, JR Doty, Rachell Sumpter, Roya Falahi , and Xi Zhang.

Jane South

Untitled (Tower), 2009, paper, ink & acrylic with cut wall, 3' dia x 10" deep, all images via Jane South

Untitled (Tower), 2009, paper, ink & acrylic with cut wall, 3' dia x 10" deep, all images via Jane South

Jane South‘s architectural paper constructions has had a firm place in my heart since I encountered her show at Whitney Altria a few years back. I was drawn to the hand cut and crafted composition, the obsessive repetition, and the illusionistic moire patterns that make up these layered industrial constructions. In a recent show at Spencer Brownstone one monumental free standing sculpture greets us with a dizzingly array of perspective, giving the viewer freedom to enter its inside and marvel at its surprising silence and delicacy.