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B/D Shop: 19 New Artist Prints!

Just in time for the holidays B/D present 19 brand new prints designed exclusively for B/D by some of your favorite artists from around the world. Each high quality print is printed on thick archival paper with the boldest inks for maximum color and resolution. Add a few prints to your collection today and make those bare walls disappear this holiday season!

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Jarritos Flavor City Winners!

Paul Naveda

Paul Naveda, 1st Place

Beautiful/Decay was recently asked to judge the Jarritos Flavor City art & design competition. Contestants were asked to creatively interpret the slogan “DRINK OUT LOUD,” and the winners are in! #1 was artist Paul Naveda, above. Check out the rest of the winners after the jump!

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The Bad Lab

The Bad Lab was brought to our attention by Eric Zelinski, who submitted them as a consideration to our “Submit your Artist” contest. Although we already chose a winner two weeks ago, we at Beautiful/Decay would like acknowledge Bad Lab’s fantastically fresh t-shirt line, prints, canvases, and posters.

I’m especially fond of the canvas work (see Set Speed and Sexagon) and how their hypnotic, rhythmic qualities entrance the viewer, pulling us into the loop.

John Monn’s Warped Use of Standard Childhood Nostalgia

A major thread in my work is the use of exotic materials or shrouds to mask and encapsulate nostalgic objects from a typical suburban childhood.


Sweet! Canvas works from Los Angeles artist John Monn. Using epoxy to group and re-contextualize toy soldiers, BB pellets, and other miscellaneous objects, Monn’s work makes you re-think the mundane and familiar. I love the unique textures he’s able to conjure by throwing a bunch of random things together. But his works definitely don’t come off as “random”. There’s clearly a strong intent behind each piece that comes through really nicely. By using objects that are associated with childhood and nostalgia within very contemporary compositions, Monn controls the context in which we think back to simpler times. More from the artist after the jump.

Support LA Street Artist Revok

If you haven’t been hiding under a rock for the past few days (I know, everyone talking about hockey or basketball playoffs may make your reconsider) then you know that Los Angeles graffiti guru Revok was arrested on his way to Ireland from LAX and sentenced to 6 months in jail for vandalism within LA County. Since the news broke there has been an abundance of support pouring out from the community as well as close friend Askew 1.  The New Zealand artist and director has decided that his recent Revok dedicated mural would be perfect to start selling prints of in benefit for his legal fund. Checkout the rest of the high res close ups and support by getting your exclusive print while they’re around, only about 100 left.

Albert Reyes’ Never Dies the Dream at Mastodon Mesa TOMORROW!


Mastodon Mesa, an on-going project at the Pacific Design Center curated by Graham Kolbeins and Mya Stark, invites you to lose yourself in the twists and turns of Albert Reyes’ vast handbuilt maze. Comprised of re-purposed wood discarded on the streets of L.A., this stunning installation has been under construction for more than four years, hidden away from the world in Reyes’ back yard—until now. Albert Reyes is a Los Angeles-based artist whose hyper-realistic yet dreamlike drawings address themes both personal and cultural. His canvas has ranged from recycled hardcover book covers to public sidewalks, where his beer spit drawings drew national media attention along with original illustrations and prints by Reyes are also on display. Check out more images from his maze as well as a video shot by Graham when the maze was still in its original habitat.

Thursday, May 20th from 5-8pm
Mastodon Mesa, Suite B210
Pacific Design Center
8687 Melrose Ave
West Hollywood, CA 90069

Pieter ten Hoopen’s Photographs Of Exotic Lands In Turmoil Are Raw And Powerful

Pieter ten Hoopen- Photograph Pieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- PhotographPieter ten Hoopen- Photograph

Swedish photographer Pieter ten Hoopen has worked within all aspects of photography, from journalism to commercial. At this point in his career he is a well known and distinguished photographer: he has received many prestigious awards, amongst them the Photographer of the Year in Sweden, and the World Press Award; he has published books of photography on Tokyo and Stockholm, and is currently working on a film project about Hungry Horse, Montana, through MediaStorm.

Ten Hoopen shoots mainly on a Nikon but also uses Yashica box cameras and a Widelux. He has worked all over the world, and travels out of known safety to deliver raw and emotionally jarring footage from places far away, many in turmoil. In the past, he has worked in Pakistan, composing images from the aftermath of the 2005 earthquake, an intimate glimpse into the pain and hardship as families continued digging through rubble in search of buried survivors. He shot the small village Vladimirskoe, Russia, which, lying next to the mythically invisible town of Kitezh, occupies a strange grey area of being juxtaposed next to a national attraction while being invisible and struggling itself; problems with alcohol and unemployment make life difficult for most of its inhabitants. In Japan, ten Hoopen visited a forest that lies below Mount Fuji, known informally as the “suicide forest,” where, yearly, nearly a hundred people travel there to commit suicide. The forest is dense with vegetation and stands on the remains of a volcanic eruption, making compasses completely useless and getting lost in the woods very easy. People tie ropes to trees to prevent themselves from getting lost, and many go in there with the intention of never coming out.

There is a stillness in his images, the composition forms its own poetry, and the emotional charge of the situations he encounters stand squarely in the frame. Within the same vein of documentary photography as Sebastião Salgado, ten Hoopen brings an unprovoked sense of art to the frame; providing a visual means with which we can connect to these feelings as viewers, even halfway across the globe, even never having stepped out of our own country. That is the most powerful aspect of this kind of a photographer, he gives voice to what he witnesses, and brings forth the unexplainable beauty and devastation that words cannot do justice to.

ALMA’s Haunting Work On The Street


Brazilian artist ALMA has been getting up a lot lately with these haunting, stark, sometimes figurative pieces that move in and out of decaying urban environments in an incredibly natural way. I like that he mixes it up between extensive, symmetrical work that kind of reminds me of Richard Colman, and flat black stuff that’s really hard to define but affective nonetheless. South America is always killin’ it.