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Keren Moscovitch Photographs Intimate Moments Of Her Open Relationship

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New York-based artist, Keren Moscovitch, attempts to explore the murky waters of open relationships through the lens of her camera. To do this, the artist relies on her own personal experiences with polyamory. The project began when her and her partner, in a monogamous relationship, decided to open their relationship up. Whether or not the decisions was made for the sake of this art project is unknown.

“I was confronted by jealousy and pain, but also got to experience a deep intimacy that I believe is only possible when we are fully vulnerable and exposed.”


The images, some of odd details of body parts, make up “Me into You,” a series of photos that shows out-of-sequence scenes of sexual encounters and romantic embraces. The choppy narrative obscures the the identities of the ones in the photos, resulting in a batch of visual chaos. By not knowing who is who, the viewer finds themselves caught up; essentially, they are having to do some guess work on who was in the original romantic relationship and who wasn’t. But, can that ever be known by just looking through these photographs?

 “I wanted my work to show moments and views of the body that most of us experience in our erotic life, but that we aren’t permitted to acknowledge in casual conversation. If we are all sexual beings, we should be able to connect around that.”

(via Huff Post)

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Christopher Saunders’ Ominous Landscape Paintings

Christopher Saunders lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. His paintings are gloomy, atmospheric, and mesmerizing. In his own words: “My recent landscape paintings are primarily built around the cloud symbol as a depiction of event, at once internal, experiential and representational. The parameters for these events are of place rather than site and suggest the apocalyptic and contemplative sublime. The clouds depicted do not reference a specific photograph but are aggregated forms generated from a multi-source photographic index. Each cloud composition is derived from a collage method which conflates images of sky, pollution, smoke, explosions, plumes, swarms, and overexposed film. Additionally, the convention of field (plane) is employed to frame and stage these lurching deformations. Compositionally, field assumes the dual role of ground (rural and urban) and atmosphere (color and light). The image value of cloud (as event) lies within its openness, its internal dynamism, and the scope of the imaginary variations to which it lends itself. Thus field and cloud collide, collude, overlap and unfold along the horizon line of precipice. These are dramas of transition, a landscape on the move where there is no contradiction between the limitless of becoming and the singularity of the event.” (Via)

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Intricate Sculpture Carved Into an Olive Pit Almost 300 Years Ago


Talk about impressive craftsmanship. In a stunning feat of virtuosity, the Chinese artist Ch’en Tsu-chang carved an astoundingly complex scene into a single olive pit in the year 1737. The tiny sculpture is complete with eight exquisite human figures enjoying a serene ride in the furnished interior of a boat with movable windows. To construct the piece, the artist, hailing from Kwangtung and having entered into the Imperial Bureau of Manufacture during the reign of emperor Yung-cheng, allowed his eye and hand to be guided by the natural shape of the olive pit.

Measuring 1.34 inches in length and .63 inches in height, the work was inspired by a poem titled “Latter Ode on the Red Cliff,” written by Su Tung-p’o some six hundred and fifty years before; it depicts the poet and his seven companions on one of his two journeys to Red Nose Cliff, the site of an epic battle that proceeded the poet-official by eight hundred years. On the helm of the boat, the artist meticulously engraved 300 characters from the beloved poem, whose moving lines served as an artistic theme well into the Qing Dynasty. Somehow, the delicate and intricate composition elevates the epic subject matter, making it all the more precious and highlighting its worth as a narrative worth careful representation. What better way to honor a poem about a natural landscape than by rendering its speaker in an organic substance?

The creation is now preserved and exhibited in Taipei City, Taiwan at the National Palace Museum of China. (via Lost at E Minor and Twisted Sifter)

Shara Hughes



Brightly colored paintings that contain rainbows and taxidermied indoor bear fountains are always good in my books. I like Shara Hughes‘ works for their subtly ironic & clever references to painting & performance and artifice.


The Dreamy Sculptures of MyeongBeom Kim

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The sculptures and installations of MyeongBeom Kim are very dreamlike – it makes just enough sense to prevent you questioning it.  Objects transform into other objects, other inexplicably float, and yet others are designed to be entirely useless.  Yet, somehow, it all seems right.  Also like dreams, Kim’s work is playful but not without out a latent sense of anxiety.  A noose, a crutch, an axe suggest a possible dark turn toward realized fears, a nightmare.

Myriam Dion Cuts And Slices Newspapers Into Beautifully Intricate Patterns

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A myriad of cut-out patterns invading a newspaper layout. Myriam Dion creates intricate motifs using a scalpel and newspapers she chooses according to their images. This French-Canadian talented student has already been acclaimed for her work. The art pieces she designs are airy reconstructed poems.

Myriam Dion picks front covers from the Herald Tribune, Le Devoir, Cape Cod Times or FT Weekend and selects images which speaks to her. She then creates negative space by hand cutting minuscule patterns. The entire page is cut-out. Generating a halo of waves and starbursts. The ornaments she designs at the edges and around the original shape of the newspaper mimic Arabic patterns and add fantasy to the layout.

The artist has invented her own organic way of transforming a simple medium into an art piece. By cutting and perforating the thin and fragile papers, Myriam Dion is making the rendering even more delicate than it originally was. The colors, thanks to the placement of the cut-outs, twirl and whirl sporadically on the surface.
The pieces, placed on a white background and revealing the negative spaces are treasures meant to be contemplated and used as a mean for evasion. (Via The Jealous Curator)

The Fat-Fat Club- Mash-Up Food Photography by Aude Debout

“The Fat-Fat Club” is a hysterically childish new book by designer Aude Debout, who has a certain knack for combining images to create something ridiculous. This book imagines how the most gluttonous people see the world; people’s heads are hot dogs, buildings turn into overflowing desserts. In addition to the surreal content of this book, Debout definitely has an eye for the grid lines in compositions; knowing exactly where and how to combine these photographs. The layout of the book also shows Debout’s understanding of the medium she’s working with, as two separate, unrelated pages come together to form one cohesive new image.