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The Homeless Are Making Money From Their Handwriting Thanks To Graphic Designers

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A bright idea is bringing together the talented homeless population of Barcelona and typography lovers from all over the world. Homeless Fonts is an initiative from Arrels Foundation and is a platform for selling the handwriting of these street sleepers to business and individuals. Around 10 fonts are available and all profits made from the sales go towards supporting the 1400 people connected with the foundation.

We all know how much handwriting reveals about a personality; the history of the writer, and this project highlights the talent and the stories of these fascinating individuals. Often overlooked on the street, they all have reasons for living how they do, and share a side of life we usually know nothing of.

Fransisco for example, in a previous life was a graphic designer. Born in Spain, raised in Brazil, he set off to experience the world. After hitchhiking around South America, he returned to Spain an old man. Living years without a permanent address, his days are still full of adventure. He says:

“The experience of the street has taken away my vanity. The only thing I’ve learnt in life is that you have to learn, because if you spend your life without learning, you haven’t lived.”

Argentinian born Guillermo uses cardboard, newspaper, anything lying around to practice his love for art and writing. Born in London, Lorraine found herself stuck in Spain after a thief illegally used her passport to travel on. Ever the optimist, she now enjoys sleeping under the stars with new friends in her adopted home.

The kinks and loops of these fonts are such an immediate and rich art work, they are perfect for making statements with. They are certainly a powerful form of communication.

Advertise here !!!

Kenji Fujita

I love Kenji Fujita’s wonky little plaster-cast combinations. They’re kind of weird, but also free spirited, organic and a bit humorous- with titles like “Debris of Life and Mind.” Heavy…..but funny. That’s a lot of debris. Kenji Fujita will be showing his works from the last 9 years at Samson Gallery, entitled “Systematic Gaiety” from February 6- March 21st. A pretty great title to describe Fujita’s controlled whimsical chaos.

Advertise here !!!

ALLDAYEVERYDAY’s Custom Jacket Art Show Collides Art, Fashion And Music

“Distressed, destroyed, or embellished, it’s the chosen fashion of outlaws, punks, rebels and bikers. To them, a jacket is an identity, a medium to express loyalty, acceptance, love, hate, rejection, freedom and nonconformity. In most cases, one can easily identify the rebellious type by their jacket alone. More specifically, members within their respective communities recognize the significance of various colors and patches as marks of rank and origin or acts of violence committed on behalf of the club. In punk subculture, even the chosen type of spike or stud adornment has a specific connotation. Because of its inherent mobility, potential for variety and badass undertone, the jacket is an art form like no other.

To introduce its new space, an incubator for creativity, ALLDAYEVERYDAY will present a selection of unique jackets, as customized by talents from the colliding worlds of art, fashion and music.” – ALLDAYEVERYDAY

Their show opens this saturday (the 27th) in New York. Wach the commercial for their show after the jump, sounds great!

James Sutton


While this video could be mistaken for an orgy of Beautiful/Decay shirts, it’s actually awesomely thought up by James Sutton, 22 year old photographer. His work is beautifully colorful and ghetto-fabulous without being overly so. In his world, everything has a smooth finish and a sense of style. Jam is “inspired by pop culture, art & music, his work is a collision of colour and culture with a subtle hint of his love for surrealism.”

Storefront for Art and Architecture’s Bright Pink Multi-Sensory Installation




Walking past the Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York City, you might catch a glimpse of a bright pink, floor-to-ceiling, perforated, amoeba-like shape. Don’t be alarmed. “Situation Room”, a collaborative project, is a self-supported interactive structure by architect Marc Fornes / TheVeryMany paired with Oslo-based artist Jana Winderen’s engineered sounds. Visitors are invited to move within the installation, triggering the responsive sound. The passageways, apertures and tunnels are composed of 2000 parts designed by Fornes and fabricated by bengal.fierro. Patterns punched in the structure create patterns of shadow and light in the darkened room. Access to additional storefront projects is available through provided tablets.

“Reflecting on the contemporary conditions emerging between the digital and the physical realms, the collaboration of Winderen and Fornes collapses sound, light and form in an object with intrinsic sensorial behaviors, inviting visitors to question the properties of matter and the built environment surrounding us.”(Source)

This site-specific work is immersive, enveloping visitors in a multi-sensory experience that enhances the tie between physical space and sound. The idea that human presence affects built environments is made clear by the integration of responsive audio. Winderen’s website explains, “She is concerned with finding and revealing sounds from hidden sources, both inaudible for the human senses and sounds from places and creatures difficult to access.”

“The installation is a vibrating sound experiment that aims to transform the architecture into animated sensible form. Conceived as a sound object that absorbs and contrasts the site specificity of the Storefront Gallery with abstract, spatial, formal and acoustic variations and compositions, Situation NY raises questions about context, sensorial readings, estrangement and the uncanny tangentially resonating with contemporary debates around the ontology of objects.” (Source)

The “Situation Room” was created with the support of Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and is on display through November 1, 2014.Photos by Miguel de Guzmán. (via Hi-Fructose)

Landscapes With Water: Artist Interview With Dan Attoe

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Dan Attoe’s newest paintings are set against the northwestern Pacific landscape. It is a place where winding streams run into surfing beaches.  The sand skinny dips into dark water that is laced with rolling white foam.  The foamy tidal beaches are framed by rocky cliffs, and all those rocks, and that moving water, is surrounded by antediluvian forest.  The trees in Washington State can make you feel very small because they are preposterously tall.  Some varieties grow to be over 200 feet, pushing outside of the boundaries of a normal tree into something that feels supernatural, or maybe übernatürlich.  The forest has the fairy tale effect of making you feel very small in comparison.  The beaches, rocky cliffs, streams, and over-sized forests in Attoe’s paintings create spaces that are reminiscent of David Lynch’s television masterpiece Twin Peaks; both literally, because of geographical overlap, and psychologically, because the natural world, by bubbling with life, moving water, and impossible trees, begins to take on symbolic resonance.  If you were an explorer on a quest for an enchanted forest, Northern Oregon and southern Washington State are very strong candidates for any enterprising search parties you are leading.  When you go you may run into Dan climbing rocks or taking pictures of the moon through his telescope.  Dan grew up in the woods, his father was a forest ranger.  He is at home there.  These paintings seem to take place at dusk, when the sun is just over the horizon.  Like that quiet time of evening, there is something quieter in this new group of paintings.  The miniature figures in Dan’s paintings seem to be dealing with mistakes of love, faulty desires, friendship, and being part of the natural world with its drumbeat of sun and tides.

You can see Dan Attoe’s new paintings in his show Landscapes with Water at Peres Projects on Karl-Marx-Allee 82 in Berlin.  The show is up from March 1st to April 19th 2014.  The photos in this interview are courtesy of Peres Projects.

Kai Sekimachi’s Delicate Bowls Made Of Leaf Skeletons Can Take A Pounding

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Although she is more known for her weaving and looming, artist Kai Sekimachi has shown she can branch out into other areas of expression with her impressive bowls made from leaves. Defying the very nature of the materials she works with, Sekimachi has come up with a way to make a flimsy leaf into a structure that can support heavier objects. By adding Kozo paper, watercolor and Krylon coating to the leaves, she is able to turn a skeletal transparent leaf into something that isn’t those things at all.

Having written numerous books on arts and crafts with her husband, Bob Stocksdale, she is an expert on many areas of handmade items and objects. The pair’s practices are both anchored in nature, and show their extensive knowledge as pioneers of American Craft.

Sekimachi creates distinctive pieces from natural materials such as linen, decaying leaves, shells, and grass, and pairs them with nature inspired motifs. (Source)

Sekimachi is not afraid to try her hand at new things, and proves repeatedly that she is a fast learner. After seeing a group of students weaving at the California College of Arts and Crafts in 1949, where she was also enrolled, the very next day, the curious artist spent all of her savings on a loom of her own. She then went and perfected her craft over the next few years.

The influential couple will be having an exhibition at the Bellevue Arts Museum titled In The Realm Of Nature from July 3 to October 18 in Washington. (Via Bored Panda)

Masterpiece On The Runway- Viktor & Rolf Create Dresses That Are Made Out Of Framed Paintings

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A runway of living masterpieces was the idea behind the couture “Wearable Art” collection.
Viktor & Rolf had models walk around wearing human size canvases for their Fall 2015 couture show. The girls were coming out wearing a denim apron and a framed canvas at first white and then punctuated by paintings inspired by Dutch golden age painter Jan Asselijn. As the show went on, both designers appeared on stage to undress a model out of three, delicately taking off the painting they were wearing as a dress and hanging it on a hook off a wall.

The show was held at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, a location known for it’s contemporary art and where designers have previously held their show. (Rick Owens, Phillip Lim and Maison Rabih Kayrouz to name a few). Viktor & Rolf gave an updated version of a fashion show, instead of having regular models strutting up and down the runway, the designers gave a performance. Trying to get as close to an art performance, blending art and fashion and demonstrating once again their genius in pattern making. Watching the video (see below) will make it much more clearer that this has nothing to do with fashion per say.

The designers are experimenting wearable art. Instead of trying to prove that fashion is art they are subtely implying that fashion is inspired by the excellence of art. By taking the clothes off the models and hanging up the garments they are claiming that fashion is humble and vulnerable compared to art. There is something naive and touching about this show. Fashion designers following the footsteps of art performers, clearly inspired and admirative of the art world.

By the end of the show, art collector Han Nefkens acquired one of the pieces to donate to the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in The Netherlands (via Dezeen).