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Arne Svenson’s Photographs Of Death Portraits Created From The Bones Of The Dead

Arne Svenson - Photography

Arne Svenson - Photography Arne Svenson - Photography

These sculptures are made from the bones of dead people. The photographic portraits of these sculptures are made by Arne Svenson. What results is Unspeaking Likeness, a strangely captivating series of death portraits, collected here.

For four years, Svenson sojourned from coroner’s offices to law enforcement agencies allover the country, snapping photographs of facial reconstruction sculptures which were built by forensic artists and molded from unidentifiable victims’ skeletal remains, with the intention of resolving crimes.

The narrative hidden behind each “face” is a mystery, and, as viewers, our own hearts tense with sadness when considering each subject’s lurid last moments of life. It’s almost too much; so, we reject the idea of reconstruction in relation to rejuvenation. It feels psychological, how we need to detach. The “face” in the context of Svenson’s portraits are not representative of an emotional life nor physical body; instead, it’s a mask or doll with a troubling echo, seemingly touched by the hands of Frankenstein.

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Mircea Cantor’s Sculptures Are made out of Everything from Corn On The Cob To Aluminum Cans


Romanian Sculptor Mircea Cantor is all over the map as far as media goes. The artist has worked with everything from aluminum cans to model airplanes (see both images above). He’s even done some “finger painting”. But what seemingly remains a constant throughout all of his work is a disdain for doing what’s been done before. Check out more images of his sculpture after the jump, including corn on the cob installation and fishing hook fighter jets. Cantor is also a co-editor of VERSION magazine. (via)

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sylvana d’angelo

Some interesting digital collages in the portfolio of Vancouver artist sylvana d’angelo . Take a peak at some of my favorites after the jump.

Alisa Ochoa’s Psychedelic Test Patterns

Alisa Ochoa’s paintings look like a kaleidoscopic world full of patterns, textures, and surreal happenings.

Ben Sanders’ Whimsical Graphic Paintings

Ben Sanders lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. His wacky acrylic paintings are full of vibrant colors, characters, and objects. Always with a sense of humor, Sanders renders portraits like The Physical Imposibility Of A Politically Correct Thanksgiving Card with glee. Another series focuses on paintings of “Magic Shoes” against exuberant backdrops of slick geometric shapes. His joyfully off-kilter environments are a treat for the senses.

Joan Rivers: A Piece Of Work

Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work takes viewers on a year long ride with Joan Rivers, the comic legend who broke barrier after barrier for female comedians and paved the way for the likes of Kathy Griffin, Sarah Silverman, and Tina Fey. As the story unravels, Mrs. Rivers talks frankly about how she got into show biz, the ups and downs of the industry, being banned by NBC late night for life, and how she will even do adult diaper & penis enlargement commercials for cold, hard cash. At the young age of 75 it seems that Joan Rivers has the energy and drive of a 25 year old, rarely stopping to catch her breath in between interviews, writing and acting in a play about her life, doing midwest comedy tours, and starring in (and winning) Celebrity Apprentice.

Next time you feel too old, uninspired, or just plain lazy, go watch this documentary for a swift kick in the ass. Joan River’s drive to keep doing what she loves until she drops dead is nothing but awe inspiring. I work harder than the average joe but walking out of the theater I felt like I had to run straight to my studio and go on a painting rampage for the next 6 months. In short Joan Rivers is a rude, crude, ass-kicking comic genius and my new personal hero.

Nathan Vincent’s Six Foot Crocheted Doily Warns ‘Be Good For Goodness Sake’

Be Good for Goodnes Sake with viewer1

Be Good for Goodness Sake detail 1

Be Good For Goodness Sake detail 2

Be Good for Goodness Sake broadcast

Santa is not the only one you telling you to be good for goodness sakes. In today’s word, that is, in today’s virtual, and real life panopticon, you have no other choice but to be good for the sake or yourself, your life, your job, etc. Your success as a human being depends on your good (or bad?) pubic, and well documented, behavior. Everyone is watching, everyone is judging.

“Be Good for Goodness Sake”,a three-person show featuring works by Nathan Vincent, Iviva Olenick, and Kathy Halper at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York, explores ideas of surveillance and public performance in the age of the virtual panopticon (intagram, facebook, etc).

Taking its name from Vincent’s large-scale work installed in the gallery,  “Be Good for Goodness Sake” pushes audiences to question their stance on surveillance and privacy in the age of social media.

Nathan Vincent’s six-foot crocheted doily acts as Big Brother and it invites the spectators to to sit on a bench flanked by security cameras, while Kathy Halper and Iviva Olenick create embroideries that question the psychosocial impacts of intimate over-sharing via social media. Inspired by her own Facebook feed, Olenick uses embroidery and watercolor to render her own “selfies” and portraits of others. Halper’s work similarly questions the disappearing space between public and private online through embroidered drawings of found images from teens’ Twitter and Facebook accounts.

The exhibition, “Be Good for Goodness Sake” will be on view at the Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York until January 19th, 2014.

Dr. Lakra

DL_PorPayasa Dr. Lakra is a Mexico-based  world renowned tattoo artist whose work has been seen on vintage printed materials and found objects rather than skin, manipulating images of pin-up girls, 1940s Mexican businessmen, luchadores, and Japanese sumo wrestlers.