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Mario Zoots

Mario Zoots does some pretty amazing collage work. I love how cut outs on faces can alter a harmless image into something a little haunting.

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Todd Knopke

ToddKnopke8

ToddKnopke

Todd Knopke weaves strange and wonderful quilts with heavy  titles like “A Powerful Force,” “Stoner,” and “Conservation and Revelation (A Certain Solidity).” What?!  I love the top image, of shrouded woodland mystics proffering ancient staffs and unknown orbs in the midst of whitelight/white heat/energy. I want to wrap my (technically) unborn black metal son in it while I sing him Sabbath to sleep! Who says quilting bees are just for fussy old ladies! Knopke’s sewn tableuxs shred! (Literally!)

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Jan Otto Schreiber

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Jan Otto Schreiber, a photographer from Hamburg, Germany, decided to explore Australia last year. He traveled by cargo ship for two months, traveling on the Panama Canal, and in that time documented his surroundings with over 250 different shots of islands, ships, and the sea. He spent weeks editing the proofs of his documentation, and ended up with 14 dreamy images.

This series is titled: Somewhere Between the Shores. A yellow-tinged, pale collection of photographs that mimics the experience of quiet nostalgia, the subtle stillness of the ocean, and the mystery inside moving silhouettes.

Kittozutto’s Website Update

Kittozutto
Art and design boutique Kittozutto (Yana and Jun) just recently updated their website with some brand new work! They’re the minds behind B/D shirt “The Web” (pictured above), which will be released this summer.

They combine fine art illustration with digital imaging, and the highly detailed results are often best seen in large formats. Women, fluids, and nature inspire their hyper-realistic yet surreal illustrations.

Mia Christopher’s Luscious Paintings

Mia Christopher lives and works in San Francisco, CA. Her vivacious paintings are executed in an intuitive manner with a wide variety of materials. Latex, glitter, eyeshadow and more are utilized to create luscious abstractions that immediately storm the viewer. Equal parts exuberant and grim, the dichotomy of her work derives from innermost feelings that are poured out to each surface as a way to communicate and promote personal exploration.

Shirin Sahba’s Exquisitely-Detailed Paintings Highlight Solitary Journeys

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Artist Shirin Sahba’s exquisite works are ripe with tiny details and beautiful, fresh color. The grandiose compositions feature large skies and cross-sectioned grounds that reveal petals, flowers, and patterns rather than dirt or grass. Gradients of pinks, purples, blues, and greens fill the in-between spaces in a dreamy, hazy sort of a way.

Aside from the repetitive symbols and drawings, Sahba’s work is minimal. Her images feature one or two people as the subject, and we aren’t given much visual context clues. Sometimes, there’s a tree swaying in an imaginary breeze or an elephant giving two lucky people a ride.

Born in India, Sahba spent her adolescence surrounded by “the pristine azures of the Mediterranean in Israel,” and she visited 25 countries before she was 16. Her paintings speak of her upbringing as well as her love old cinema and traditional roots steeped in the Old Persian art of miniature. “I have often repeated the narrative of solitary characters traveling with no specific destination, allowing the journey itself to carry more importance,” she writes in an artist statement. “I have also concentrated on the simplifications of the traditional landscape into an abstract picture plane of colour and textures, while including figurative miniature characters and architectural elements, unifying the abstract with the representational. The characters are allowed to freely traverse a surreal landscape of floating colour planes.” (Via Art Hound)

Animal Sculptures Created Out Of Plastic Beach Litter

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

animal sculptures

French artist Gilles Cenazandotti constructs life-size animals out of litter he’s combed from beaches, recycling a variety of plastics and other detritus. Titled, “Future Bestiary,” this series of sculptures directly addresses problems related to throw-away culture and the waste that results from conspicuous consumption. When the creatures are inserted into natural landscapes, they almost appear digitally rendered because the contrast between natural and man-made elements is so pronounced. Of his work, Cenazandotti says,

“Impressed by everything that the Sea, in turn, rejects and transforms, on the beaches I harvest the products derived from petroleum and its industry. The choice of animals that are part of the endangered species completes this process. In covering these animals with a new skin harvested from the banks of the Sea, I hope to draw attention to this possible metamorphosis – to create a trompe l’oeil of a modified reality.” (via laughing squid and junk culture)

Jon Uriarte’s Photographs Of Men Wearing Their Girlfriends Clothes

Carlos & Naia

Carlos & Naia

Nick & Reiko

Nick & Reiko

Javi & Gabi

Javi & Gabi

Jose & Ainara

Jose & Ainara

In Spanish photographer Jon Uriarte’s series The  Men Under the Influence, he photographs men wearing the clothes of their girlfriends or wives. The images are composed in the space shared by the couple. Uriarte displays ideas of gender through clothing, as the men wear outfits that would be considered feminine, including dresses and strappy sandals.  In a short statement about the series, he writes:

This work addresses the recent change in roles in heterosexual relationships from the relations of our predecessors and how those changes have affected men in particular. The photos attempt to capture men’s sense of loss of reference, now that women have taken a step forward and have finally come into their own as equal partners.

While I don’t agree entirely with some of the sentiments in this statement, I do appreciate the gender-bending nature of it. The socially-constructed roles of men and women tie our identities to an arbitrary notion that we each have to be a certain way just because of our gender. Clothing is a way we can outwardly express ourselves and our choices. I like seeing these men, looking unaffected by their attire (and even comfortable), sitting in the the place where they share their homes and their lives. (via feature shoot)