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The Drawings And Clothing Of Dinosaur Special Cassette Are Out Of This World

DSC Drawing fashionDSC Drawing fashionDSC Drawing fashionDSC Drawing fashion

The Artist Collective known as DSC or Dinosaur Special Cassette make some pretty neat stuff. Based out of the UK, it consists of two people who create drawings and garments. A colorful variation of ideas on instagram eventually show up in clothing lines for children and adults. These drawings stand alone in originality encompassing vibrant hue reminiscent of rainbows and youthful subject matter. They possess an amazing amount of original wonder and charm. They take a lot of influence from children’s textile patterns but with a tad more flavor. The narratives speak to Romare Bearden in collaged color and placement. It’s exciting to see people on social media drawing with such abandon. This is where you can see the best scribbles of DSC.

DSC’s clothing is sewn under the label Klushka. These are one of a kind pieces inspired by their fabulous drawings. One called “Critter Applique Jumper” is a blue smiling blob painted on top a pink sweatshirt made of newsprint patterned material. It combines early Sex Pistols never mind the bollocks with a funky collage effect. A collection of long tees or nighties with elaborately drawn prints of aliens and dollar signs are also offered. Those take reference from eighties artists like Jean Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.

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Malene Hartmann Rasmussen Explores The Darkness Of The Forest In Her New Mythical Installation

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Artist Malene Hartmann Rasmussen’s new installation “In The Dead Of Night” got her a spot amongst the 5 winners of Jerwood Makers Open, in the UK. It is her biggest work yet, featuring an artificial forest with trees 3,60m trees amongst which rabbits, mushrooms, and other elements of forest scenery can be seen. The end result of this elaborate scenery is a walk through installation where the audience can take in their surroundings in an environment full of sights and sounds.

Hartmann has taken a familiar surrounding and made it just strange enough for you to pick up an underlying mystical tone and soak in the artificial beauty of her creation. However, “In The Dead Of Night” is not a simple depiction of a forest, it reaches beyond this imagery: The forest in this piece also serves as a metaphor for the different corners of the mind and, walking through the installation prompts the audience to take a walk through their own minds.

For this piece, Hartmann has made use of various mediums and materials including ceramics, neon, photography, mixed media, light and sound. This combination of materials has made for a very thoughtful, eclectic piece with many details to spark and capture the viewer’s attention. By allowing the public to walk through the installation, Hartmann has elevated the status of the public to that of a participant, which, in turn reinforces the echos of nature present in her piece.

End with: Hartmann Rasmussen’s work has been featured previously on Beautiful Decay Photographs by Sylvain Deleu

Ghost of a Dream Lottery Ticket Installations

Artist collective Ghost Of A Dream uses discarded lottery tickets to create brilliant installations of what lottery winner just might buy with all that cold hard cash. The installation above features over $70,000 worth of discarded lottery tickets to create the ultimate “Dream Home” full of expensive art, antique furniture, and of course a lottery ticket encrusted chandelier. View more images of the Dream Home as well as the dream car and dream vacation after the jump.

Nishio Yasuyuki’s Giant Women

I’m loving Nishio Yasuyuki’s massive sculptures of women. They are bizarre grotesque shrines to to horror films and nightmarish manga stories.

Women Confront Their Body Insecurities In Empowering Photographic Series By Neringa Rekasiute

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

Rekasiute, Photo

While the work of Lithuanian photographer Neringa Rekasiute ranges from surreal scenes of fantasy to eccentric portraits, each photo illustrates a prevalent theme of her oeuvre: an admiration and appreciation for the female form. Thus, it is no surprise that Neringa has teamed up with writer, journalist, and actress Beata Tiskevic and communications specialist Modesta Kairyte to create We.Women, a female-centric photographic series.

Inspired by theories of feminism and discouraged by Lithuania’s apparent and prevailing cult of beauty, Neringa, Beata, and Modesta imagined We.Women as an empowering response to the impossible standards of beauty projected onto women.

Using Beata’s Facebook page as a platform, the trio invited women with self-esteem issues to assist them with their project by partaking in a harrowing task: standing before a mirror, shedding their clothing, and allowing their bodies and consequent reactions to be photographed.   The results—twelve black-and-white photos accompanied by a personal memoir written by each woman—are captivating and relatable, with the heartaches at hand spanning “anorexia, bulimia, breast cancer, vitiligo, depression, fat-shaming, and skinny-shaming,” as well as additional mental health perils and even cases of domestic abuse.

Deemed by Neringa as “a healing experience,” We.Women has undoubtedly aided the creators in their objective to spread awareness and, subsequently, to bring women together: “I just want women to feel united,” Neringa divulges, “I want us to feel bonded.” (Via Bored Panda)

Leslie Ann O’Dells’ Hauntingly Surreal Portraits Flourish With Beauty And Death

Psyche

Psyche

Novocaine

Novocaine

Widow

Widow

Hope

Hope

Leslie Ann O’Dell is a self-taught photo-illustration artist from Denver who creates hauntingly surreal portraits of women. Recurring throughout her works are washed-out figures overgrown with flowers and foliage; patterns sprout and undulate in the place of eyes, and everywhere you look subtle details unravel through hair and across skin. Charged with an arcane darkness, O’Dell’s works summon the chilling, seductive beauty of vampires and forest spirits. With nature, the psyche, and the subconscious as some of the central themes, the portraits shift gracefully between reality and dreams.

O’Dell’s subjects are specters of both beauty and death: flowers bleed and adorn the women’s heads like funeral offerings, bodily contours putrefy into weeds, and sightless eyes gaze into an unseen abyss. In a figurative representation of death-becoming-life (and vice-versa), a bird stretches its wings inside an opened chest cavity (see “Hope”). Some of the images confront us with a more somber beauty — observe the ethereal and aloof figures in “Contemporary Monster” and “Sleepwalk.” Vacillating between delicacy and intense emotion, O’Dell’s works seduce and seize the imagination.

Visit O’Dell’s website, Facebook, Instagram, and Tumblr to view more of her work. (Via Juxtapoz)