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Fred Tomaselli

Fred Tomaselli
Fred Tomaselli is best known for his highly detailed paintings on wood panels, combining an array of unorthodox materials suspended in a thick layer of clear, epoxy resin. He sees his paintings and their compendium of data as windows into a surreal, hallucinatory universe. “It is my ultimate aim”, he says, “to seduce and transport the viewer in to space of these pictures while simultaneously revealing the mechanics of that seduction.”

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Moonage Daydream

Keep your ‘lectric eye on me, babe, put your ray gun to my head, press your space face next to mine love, freak out on a moonage daydream….Setareh Mohtarez’s glam interstellar fashions are what the queen being of light would wear to her prom in the outer cosmos.

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Fabian Marcaccio Creates Grotesque Sculptures With Paint

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Argentinian artist Fabian Marcaccio’s sculptures are paintings come to life. During the 90s, Marcaccio began to create a series of sculptures he referred to as “paintants,” a portmanteau of “painting” and “mutant,” of which he combines digitally manipulated imagery, sculptural form, and 3D painted surfaces. From this point, he began to create work influenced “by the dynamic relationship…between elements and overcrowdings that attract and string one another, link up and get activated in time and space.” His sculptures are at once stable as physical entities and unstable as representations of excess and collapse. Marcaccio uses a variety of media in his creations including oil and acrylic paints, silicon, sand, rope, plastic, wood, and aluminum. He’ll also create color-saturated brushstrokes with white or colorless silicon and stick them onto his sculptures.

B/D Best of 2010 – Tenko

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Swiss artist Tenko‘s work seems to represent a twisting, flawed humanity that we try to forget. Looking at his work I’m very conscious of the fact that my supposedly higher thoughts and feelings all rely on a system of organs, pumps, and fluids to exist and no amount of perfume is going hide the fact that we are simply beasts of flesh and bone. Maybe it’s all those perfectly modeled legs or even the grotesque facial expressions but I feel like I’m definitely gonna have to exfoliate tonight.

Kour Pour Recreates Carpets In Every Painstaking Detail

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Taking images from auction catalogs, artist Kour Pour translates intricately-patterned carpets onto paneled surfaces. The multi-step process is labor intensive, not to mention large – his work is 8 feet tall. First, Pour scans in the image of a rug and burns it on a silk screen. Then, he uses a broom to begin his underpainting (the texture gives it an appearance of a textile). Afterwards, he silkscreens the design to the panel and begins the work of painting every painstaking detail. The final step is to use an electrical sander to erase the painted surface and expose the layers of the under-painting. What results is work that looks like an faded, well-worn rug.

Pour is both British and Persian, and when he was younger, his father owned a rug shop in England. His work is tied to this past, as he explains in his artist statement:

Carpets were a part of my childhood growing up in England. I remember my Father’s rug shop, and how he would hand-dye sections of carpets that had faded away, in order to bring them back to their original colours. I felt that in doing this, my Father was making an effort to maintain all their history and meaning, as if he was bringing the carpets back to life. When I first moved to Los Angeles I had feelings of displacement and much like the faded carpets, I too felt a part of my history disappear. I started the carpet painting series and noticed how art and objects could play an increasingly important role in our diverse society. Through making these paintings I am constantly learning more about my background and the rich mix of culture that surrounds me and the carpets.

By recreating carpets, Pour highlights their meaning as object, as well as the implications of their surface design. They signify an object of privilege (as their originals come from an auction catalog), and our commodity-based consumer culture. Beyond that, the patterns of animals and men on horses is representational of globalization, a culture’s history, and more.  (Via Bmore Art and Flat Surface)

Network Osaka


Network Osaka is a graphic designer. That’s pretty much all I know about him or her. I don’t think they’re from Japan. They’re either from California or Mexico. Past that, Network Osaka has done some really nice print work, often employing a straightforward modernist aesthetic without seeming too derivative of the old masters.


Cool comic book-y illustrations from Eamo with an all over the place, spontaneous sense of line.

New work by Tim Lahan

Tim Lahan

Really digging these new celebrity/model mud-Michelin-Man makeovers by Tim Lahan. Also digging, across the board, gross-out illustration work as of late.