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Cal Lane’s Delicate Flourishes And Motifs Cut Into Weathered Metal Objects

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New York-based artist Cal Lane combines traditional metal work with flourishes and delicate motifs. She handcuts lace and other patterns in weathered I-beams, shovels, trash cans, large storage containers, and more. The result is work that references dichotomies: industrial and domestic life; strong and delicate; practical and frivolity; ornament and function. “There is also a secondary relationship being explored here, of lace used in religious ceremonies as in weddings, christenings and funerals,” Lane writes in her artist statement.

She continues, writing about what we can understand by this surprising pairing:

The metaphor of lace further intrigued me by its associations of hiding and exposing at the same time; like a veil to cover, or lingerie to reveal. It also introduces a kind of humor through the form of unexpected relationships. Like a Wrestler in a tutu, the absurdity of having opposing extremist stances is there for reaction and not rational understanding; the rational discussion arises in the search for how one thing defines the other by its proximity. (Via L’Acte Gratuit)

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German Activists Target Urinating, Drunken Party Tourists With Splash-Back Surfaces

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

St. Pauli pinkelt zurück

A strange new campaign has started in St Pauli, the party district of Hamburg in Germany. In order to deter drunken party goers who have a habit of peeing on walls, doorsteps, playgrounds and in alley ways, local activists have coated the surfaces in a substance that will change where visitors go to the toilet. This wonder substance is a superhydrophobic coating which causes any substance to hit it to rebound and splash back more than it normally would. Some areas are marked with warning signs, some are not. Most importantly they don’t mean to be unfriendly toward tourists, it acts more as a strong message.

Such a simple, novel idea thought up by a community group will have such a wide reaching impact, and will make a whole lot of local businesses happier, cleaner and a lot less stinky.

The group also plans to roll out a program in which people using the restroom at bars can get a stamp on a special card that can be redeemed for a shot on the house after the sixth restroom trip. One thing is for certain: if you pee in public in St. Pauli, “urine” trouble. (Source)

The campaign is a tongue-in-cheek approach to a serious issue for the area. And proves that St Pauli can defend itself. So far the idea has made waves around the internet and perhaps will encourage other areas to do the same. (Via Bored Panda)

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Get Lost In This Massive 186 Ton Steel Labyrinth In Belgium

Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth Gijs Van Vaerenbergh - labyrinth

Architecture duo known as Gijs Van Vaerenbergh have installed 186 tons of 5mm thick steel walls in Genk, Belgium, creating a dense labyrinth for visitors to navigate their way through. The dense maze is made from walls 5 meters high and creates an impressive structure of many corridors and industrial looking alleyways. The pathways and shapes of the labyrinth aren’t only rectangular, or flat either. The pair have cut out cylindrical and spherical shapes and voids in the maze, allowing for some very strange view points. The pair describe their project a bit more:

A series of Boolean transformations create spaces and perspectives that reinterpret the traditional Labyrinth is a sculptural installation that focuses on the experience of space. These Boolean transformations convert the walk through the labyrinth into a sequence of spatial and sculptural experiences. At the same time, the cutouts function as ‘frames’ to the labyrinth. Seen from some certain perspectives, the cut-outs are fragmentary, whereas from other viewpoints the entire cut-out shape is unveiled. (Source)

The pair are known for their ambitious, eye catching public installations and like to create architecture that reacts to or compliments the environment it is placed in. The particular installation is part of the 10th anniversary celebrations at the c-mine Arts Center which now stands where a coal mine once did. Gijs Van Vaerenbergh have taken ideas of the mine shafts below the surface and transferred them into their ideas for the labyrinth. They go on to say:

Furthermore, the production and construction processes remain visible in the final design. Visitors who ascend the mine shafts nearby, can view the labyrinth as a materialised floor plan and sculptural whole – a perspective that runs against what a labyrinth should do: conceal itself. (Source)

(Via Design Boom)

Zero Cents’ paintings of Bloodbaths

Tel Aviv artist Zero Cents updated his blog recently. Cents is great because his style fits his subject matter so well. I feel dirty just looking at these, and I mean that in the best way possible. See more of the artist’s gory new stuff after the jump. 

Artist Turns River Stones Into Meditative Mandalas With Endless Patterns Of Colorful Dots

Elspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on StoneElspeth McLean - Acrylic Paint on Stone

Australian artist Elspeth McLean takes ordinary ocean rocks and turns them into colorful, geometric Mandalas. Through intense detail and repetitive patterns, the artist finds meditation in painting these found stones with endless acrylic dots. The acrylic paint used on her pocket-sized creations allows her to add an element of dimension in her already layered colors. These intense colors create a palette so crisp and brilliant, it is as if the stones are encrusted with jewels. Painting dots has become so embedded in McLean’s art process, that she even coined the term “Dotillism” to describe her unique style. Each dot that is painted to create her intricate, endless patterns takes an incredible amount of patience and focus. Although completing these Mandala patterns may seem like a difficult task, McLean describes this process as a grounding experience where she can find enjoyment and experience reflection.

The Mandala is a spiritual symbol in Eastern religions that holds meditative properties. It is no wonder McLean has chosen such a strong, healing symbol in her work, as she believes in the healing nature of color and art. She pulls influence from seasons, cosmos, mythology, and ancient art to create her hand-held Mandalas. Her interest in the cosmos can be seen in her stones that are painted not as a geometric pattern, but instead as incredible constellations, still painted in her dotted signature style. An avid traveler, the Australian artist is now living in Canada, gathering inspiration from the new landscapes she perceives throughout her journey. (via Demilked)

Roger Minick’s “Sightseers” Photos From The 1970s Take You Back In Time

sightseers

sightseers

sightseers

Roger Minick

 

While teaching at the Ansel Adams Workshops in Yosemite National Park in the 1970s Roger Minick began photographing sightseers.  Interested in this American activity Minick wanted to capture the “cacophony of clicking shutters” and waves of tourists seeking photographic proof that they had made it to a famous vista.

Minick’s photographs portray unique narratives of what is mainly America’s middle-class.  Poignant and humorous all at once, the images show varied individuals with intriguing and sometimes seemingly strange stories.  What is interesting is that, so far as a viewer can tell, all the subjects have only one thing in common: their desire to be in famous places in nature.  Sometimes stereotyped Minick’s images successfully portray the American tourist as being wholly distinct.

Moreover, set against iconic backdrops the images become more than just portraits.  They demonstrate a juxtaposition of nature and culture.  As David Pagel wrote in the LA Times in 1997, “these supple works use the discomfort most people feel when confronted by nature’s inhuman scale as a metaphor for the precariousness of culture in a democratic society. Awkward and uncertain, sometimes fun and at other times frightening, this quiet anxiety is a big part of these pictures’ power.”

Vaughn Fender’s Animated Type

Designer, illustrator, and printmaker Vaughn Fender is a big thinker when it comes to typeography. His type is big, bold, and full of character!

Olivia Locher

Olivia Locher might just be 21 years old but her photography has a level of sophistication that you don’t often see at such a young age. Creating layered and complex narratives Olivia takes us on a surreal journey where young girls are stacked in corners like dolls, marshmallows are stuffed down your pants, and pretty girls and pretty flowers are wrapped in plastic to keep them beautiful for eternity.