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ALMA’s Haunting Work On The Street

 

Brazilian artist ALMA has been getting up a lot lately with these haunting, stark, sometimes figurative pieces that move in and out of decaying urban environments in an incredibly natural way. I like that he mixes it up between extensive, symmetrical work that kind of reminds me of Richard Colman, and flat black stuff that’s really hard to define but affective nonetheless. South America is always killin’ it.

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Robot ethics becoming a concern with corpse-feeding droids on the battlefield

EATR
I heard this discussion over the ethics of killer robots (ENERGETICALLY AUTONOMOUS TACTICAL ROBOT, appropriately shortened to “EATR”) on the battlefield on KPCC radio bright ‘n’ early this morning and became excited over the possibility of science fiction plot lines inching closer and closer to reality. This picture above will not be what they look like (a more accurate modeled depiction after the jump), but how frightening would it be if these self-refueling lovelies really did jump into the uncanny valley? The government is trying to make more “ethically” aware EAT(E)Rs that will reject tasty corpse morsels on the battlefield (this is apparently against the Geneva convention?) for more Brontosaurus-friendly scraps. The question comes then, if your robot kills someone on the battlefield, who’s moral dilemma does it become? Obviously robots are not of a sentient mind to make such decisions…or are they?

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Through Magnified Faces Tony Oursler Is Teaching Us That Biometric Data Recognition Is Going Too Far

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Tony Oursler - Photography 4Common movie scenes are showing us police mug shots, incognito faces in crowds and wanted killer posters. None of these seem unnatural or chocking anymore, we are tamed by cyberculture and technology. We could not imagine having to go through an identity check other than with our passport, signature or a police officer physically present in front of us. Yet, we’ve already left those ancient methods and engaged with facial, retina and odour recognition; fingerprints and hand geometry. We’ve entered the biometric data era. Not always conscious of how fast the world evolves around us, Tony Oursler has set a mission to “invite the viewer to glimpse themselves from another perspective that of the machines we have recently created”. He has been exploring the link between the growth of our technological dependance and its effect on our psychology.

The artist has created magnified face images, some of them coated with a stainless steel panel embeded with video screens and others marked with geometric patterns of algorythmic facial recognition mapping. He is embarking us with a dash of humor into the disturbing technology’s effect on the human mind. Tony Oursler plays with the face. Starting with the eyes and going down into the neck,  he is suggesting that technology will use every bit of skin and organ to study the daily behavior, emotions and rituals of humans in order to categorize them. The viewer when facing those giant profiles is left with the strange feeling of being watched. The artist wants to highlight how uncanny is the process of teaching machines how to observe only the external appareance and to pretend, from there, to understand human’s true nature.

Tony Oursler is currently represented by Lisson Gallery.

Robin Rhode

Robin Rhode
Calling Robin Rhode a ‘street artist’ is a bit misleading. It just so happens that most of his art is made in the street, but this multidisciplinary artist makes his mark in a variety of ways. Much of his work is performance based, not in the traditional sense, but rather through a process in which he acts in a 3D space and at the same time utilizes the illusion of a drawn object… and then the entire process is photographed, leaving the viewer with a consolidated mixture of mediums, spaces, forms and ideas.

Justine Ashbee

"Force", 33" x 35"

"Force", 33" x 35"

Justine Ashbee’s work is an amorphous trip into the non-linear  realm of the imagination. Her work is executed purely by hand, using paint pens. She begins with a  curve, from which lines and forms begin to spontaneously morph, and grow. Each piece gives voice to an experience, spoken in a visual language of  elegance and beauty.

Mike Stefanini

Classic typography with a twist, slick illustrations, and just the right amount of humor go into all the works in the portfolio of Parisian designer and illustrator Mike Stefanini A.K.A Atomike Studio.

Shi Mohan’s Paintings Of Weird Childhood Daydreams

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There is an unnerving quality to Shi Mohan‘s paintings, as though they are capturing daydreams, complete with all the surrealness and subconscious metaphors that come with the territory.

According to Art Seasons, a gallery in Singapore and Beijing that has previously shown her work, “Shi Mohan jocularly calls herself a life Illustrator. Pleasantly and sensitively, she documents the nity-gritty of her own life, portraying many bizarre and outlandish thoughts and desires on the canvas.”

There is a certain playfulness to Mohan’s art, though the off-kilter imagery can make it seem more sinister. Her paintings are snapshots of a more innocent yet stranger time: the weird days of youth. (via Supersonic Art)

Beautiful/Decay Book 8 Cover Sneak Peak

Beautiful/Decay Book: 8 is on its way to us from the printers and we just can’t wait to share with you all the amazing artists that we have featured. We’re not ready to announce who made the cut and what the theme is just yet but I thought i’d tease you with just a small portion of the cover. Why don’t you take a guess and see if you can figure out what’s on the cover. It’s one of our best cover images yet and I know it will blow you away. Make sure to reserve your very own copy of Beautiful/Decay Book 8 by subscribing today. We have only printed 1,500 books and once they are sold out they will never be reprinted again!