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Sponsored Post- Tilt-Shift Photography- How To Make Everyday Images Look Like Miniature Worlds


Tilt-shift photography is becoming increasingly popular in the mobile photo editing world. Even if you’re not sure what it is exactly, you’ve definitely seen it on your social feeds, and after reading this article, you’re definitely going to have a lot of fun with it.

Ready? Let’s jump right in!

So…what is it?
Tilt-shift photography is a technique that has several different uses, but nowadays, its most common use is simulating a miniature effect.

Okay, how do I do it?
Simulating tilt-shift photography is actually pretty simple. There are lots of mobile photo editors out there, but the one we are loving right now is called PicsArt Photo Editor. They just came out with a Tilt-Shift Tool that’s really easy to use, but this app really shines in all the different ways that you can personalize your shots. But let’s talk about what you need to do.

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Artist Interview: Jason Jagel


"Songs of Innocence and Experience / Never No Mo Blues"

Jason Jagel creates splendidly multi-sensorial works that evidence a beautiful sense of color, linework and a knack for cohesively organizing multitudinous pieces of imagery and open areas. Jagel recently contributed a lovely interview detailing his process, his approach to composition, inspiration, and much more.


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Awesome Video Of The Day: Running on Seeds Ai Weiwei Protest at Tate Modern


On May 1st  three american art students decided to jump the barriers surrounding Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds piece at the Tate modern’s Turbine hall. This action was in protest against the barrier, against the original intentions of the work being inhibited by health and safety (originally museum visitors were to walk on the seeds), to support the release of Ai Weiwei by the Chinese government, and promote freedom of speech and art. The biggest surprise in the video comes when dozens of other museum members joined the three students in a spontaneous group protest. Now that’s power to the people! Watch the full video after the jump!

“Post – Interesting Paintings”

Chris Millar’s paintings are an interesting mix between R. Crumb, Robert Williams, and your grandmothers nick nack collection. His work is dense with stories, vignettes, and bizarre scenes that wil l keep you staring at one piece for hours before walking off to the next. Take a look at his website by clicking the title link above for more examples of his bizarre world.

B/D Apparel Artist Interview: Jiro Bevis

Jiro Bevis

To celebrate the release of B/D Apparel’s new Spring collection, we are featuring a 5-part interview series, giving you a behind-the-scenes look at each of the artists who create our graphics. Within these interviews, we explore their creative process, tools of the trade, influences, and their advice for fellow creatives.

For the first interview in the series, we caught up with Jiro Bevis, who collaborated with us to create “B/D Breakfast Club” and “Thumbs Up”. Jiro’s work interweaves iconic pop cultural references and inside jokes alike, resulting in a bold mix of idiosyncratic images, united by Bevis’ humorous approach.

Read the full interview after the jump!

Jeremy Willis


Jeremy Willis had me over to his Brooklyn studio and we hung out and talked about his paintings.  Willis describes the paintings anthropomorphically – as wanting to be doing something human, like giving birth, hugging you or selling you illicit substances.  The majority of the paintings are big and surround you with saturated colors and chaotic space.  They do feel like they have an overwhelming emotional content, and the paintings reflect the messy nature of life.  Look for more from Jeremy soon.

Lina Manousogiannaki’s Photos Of Aging Superheroes




Batman holds a gun to his own head at the edge of an empty swimming pool. Captain and Mrs. America sip mixed drinks under palm fronds. Spiderman naps on the couch. These are our Superheroes, candidly captured in their off hours. But they’re not the Superheroes we’re used to underneath their familiar suits. These Superheroes are aged, white-haired and wrinkled, and somehow completely wrong. The characters we know may die, but although they live for decades they never grow old. Our heroes stay perpetually strong, alluring, and complicated, and always, always young.

Lina Manousogiannaki’s costumed heretics of “Superheroes Gone Old” represent more than the inevitability of old age. To her, the aging superheroes they serve as reminders of the damaged Greek political system, one that politicians and people of her parents’ generation have been unwilling or unable to change.

[The series] was conceived as homage to the generation of my parents, the same one as our politicians. They have been pretending to be heroes ever since the collapse of the military junta but time has caught up with them. My heroes are old and they are afraid of everything that they can’t control. … The heroes of another time can no longer save me as they have pretended to do for so many years.

There is anger in Manousogiannaki’s writing that isn’t reflected in her images. These heroes are worn out, slightly absurd, certainly pathetic. And yet, there is the suggestion of pride here, of perseverance. They haven’t divested themselves of their worn finery. They haven’t stopped fighting. In a country with a struggling economy and generational discord, the heroes are stooped and sad. Manousogiannaki’s intent may be to put them aside and lead her own fight, but these archetypical heroes seem to be saying that it will be harder than she thinks.

David Altmejd

David Altmejd’s sculptural works anatomically analyze and digitally disect organic forms to create hauntingly recontextualized works that evoke human form in strange new ways. In their altered states, they are at once strangely familiar and aversive. Like mythological humanimal creations such as the werewolf or Frankenstein, Altmejd’s creatures wondrously hobble to life with a magic all their own. Altmejd is represented in New York City by Andrea Rosen GalleryXavier Hufkens, Brussels and Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London.