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This Is What Humans Looked Like 30,000 Years Ago


The Paris-based sculptor Elisabeth Daynès listens to bones, to the remains of our evolutionary ancestors that have lived up to three million years ago. Throughout her prolific 20 year career, the “paleoartist” has worked from the skulls of wooly mammoths to species of hominid to create vividly detailed figures. Based on 18 data points that mark the bone, she can use a computer to model facial features that she later shapes out of clay. She refers to research and other bone samples to determine the build of her subjects, and ultimately she creates a silicone cast, complete with delicate painted features: veins, goosebumps, blemishes.

In a final step towards humanizing her sculptures, Daynès includes prosthetic eyes, teeth, and hair, each of which is as historically and scientifically accurate as possible. Current research suggests that Neanderthals, for example, had red hair; for her uncanny hominids, that range from Homo sapien to Homo erectus, she uses a blend of human hair. In her mind’s eye, the artist draws an informed portrait of each subject she reanimates; from the bones, she can determine period, sex and age, along with finer details like culture, climate, diet, and health.

For Daynès, this process is as much an art as it is a science. Ultimately, she hopes to reconnect with our past, embarking on a forensic search of what makes us human. Dismayed by the ways in which early human ancestors are reviled as unintelligent brutes, she injects her creations with a powerful dose of humanity; their brows furrow with concentration, and their eyes are painfully gentle. She explains “missing” them when they leave her studio for a permanent home in a museum. Take a look. (via Daily Mail and Lost at E Minor)

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Jaimie Warren’s Playful Pop Culture Selfies Subvert The Form’s Perceived Vanity

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Pretzel Rod Stewart

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as Lasagna Del Rey

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as woman in Les Demoiselles d’Avignon by Pablo Picasso

Self-portrait as Yoda in L'admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Self-portrait as Yoda in L’admiration by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Selfies are a ubiquitous mode of self-expression. Photographer and performance artist Jaimie Warren integrates pop culture. humor, and a bright color palette to create visually striking self-portraits that are absurd, humorous, and campy. In one photo series, Warren becomes celebrity-food characters, fusing their names into an offbeat expression. In another, she re-creates images from art history, embellishing them with her signature pop culture camp style. Warren’s selfies subvert the form of traditional portraiture by using absurdity and grotesqueness to supplant the selfie’s identification with vanity. In addition to her individual projects, Warren also co-directs an internationally touring “faux-cable access show” called Whoop Dee Doo, a nonprofit that partners with youth organizations to introduce kids to wonderfully strange art that is meaningful, fun, and compelling. (via la monda and vice)

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Melissa Manfull

LA-based artist Melissa Manfull‘s watercolors and drawings are all at once architectural and abstract. And, wouldn’t you know it, modern architecture and colorful, geometric art are two of my favorite things. Manfull has studied and practiced studio art both in the US and Canada, but she is now living and work in Los Angeles, California, USA. She has had a few solo exhibitions, and is currently represented by Taylor de Cordoba Gallery.

Shay Aaron’s Amazing Miniature Food Sculptures

Shay Aaron creates delicious looking, incredibly small,  and extremely photo realistic sculptures of all your favorite food items from a delicious stack of cupcakes to the most tasty BBQ favorites. The only shortcoming of the work is that I’d have to eat at least 100,000 pieces by her to justify it even as an afternoon snack.(via gaks)

Olivia Locher

Olivia Locher might just be 21 years old but her photography has a level of sophistication that you don’t often see at such a young age. Creating layered and complex narratives Olivia takes us on a surreal journey where young girls are stacked in corners like dolls, marshmallows are stuffed down your pants, and pretty girls and pretty flowers are wrapped in plastic to keep them beautiful for eternity.

Brandon Jan Blommaert

Any information regarding the details of Brandon Jan Blommeart’s existence can not be found- his current info page is a self reminder to put up some kind of blurb and maybe an animated gif. I like these sculpture/collage things he did with recycled material, though I can’t tell if they are made in a 3D modeling program or out of physical materials (a comment on his in-progress post mentions the former). These abandoned beasts struggling in the wild remind me a little of characters from Miyazaki’s Nausicaa.

Edit: I just got an email back from Brandon (who lives in Canada) with some details breaking somewhat his shroud of mystery. These sculptures are indeed made out of garbage and created for a public arts commission. The final forms will be large vinyl prints wrapping the side of a building. Can’t wait to see photos of when they’re actually up!

Mark Farid Wants To Spend 28 Days As Another Person Through A Virtual Reality Headset

Mark Farid Mark Farid  virtual realityMark Farid Mark Farid

Artist Mark Farid is attempting to undertake a strenuous social experiment and is asking for your assistance. He has a Kickstarter project called Seeing-I which is aimed at raising enough money to develop a headset that he will wear for 24 hours a day, for 28 days in a row. With the piece of technology he will live his daily life completely and utterly through the experience of another person. He will see everything through the eyes of the second person, including when they go to the cinema, to the toilet and having sex. The only prerequisites for this other human – naturally called “The Other” is to be over 21 years, a heterosexual male, currently living with his partner, and they must agree it to. If you personally suit those guidelines, you can apply here to become a part of the experiment.

Farid will throughout the process be living completely on display in a small box containing only a bed, a toilet and a shower. All of his actions will be open for all to witness and completely transparent. Because of the intensity of this project and what could be mentally damaging to most people, Farid will have the support of one psychologist for one hour a day, and will be the only time he is able to talk to someone.

The Seeing-I project will result in a documentary wanting to explore just how virtual reality affects us emotionally, the role of the individual in the larger society, how we define ourselves through what we see, and we know of ourselves. Farid says about the integrity of the project:

I don’t think any of the realities in which we live are genuine. We take this physical reality as ‘real’, but, you know, every building, road, park and garden has been designed… Everything within our existence is unnatural. We live in an entirely man-made world, where none of it is ‘real’. (Source) (Via Dazed Digital)

Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs


It’s funny how “facts” “evidence” and “reality” have a way of changing over time. How do they decide where the line between legal and illegal lies? Sometimes it’s anyone’s guess. Though probably money related. Rena Littleson’s The Truth About Drugs series of graphic illustrations explores these topics and more after the jump.