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James Kerr’s Humorous And Naughty Renaissance Collaged Gif Animations

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Under the name Scorpion Dagger, British artist James Kerr creates digital gif collages, mainly from northern and early Renaissance paintings. Kerr combines this imagery with images from popular culture, resulting in absurd and humorous animations.

“What I hope people feel/experience when they see one of my GIFs is something of both an amused reaction, and that of wanting to look at art differently…I love looking at images and imagining them differently. Essentially, you know that question where people ask ‘What do you see in that painting?’ Well, this is kind of that but expressed through an animated GIF.” (via the daily dot)

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Gaspar Lepage

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Gaspar Lepage is the pseudonym of Bristol artist Marcello Velho. His work, which is mostly animated GIFs, explores the pre-Web 2.0 era internet aesthetic (Geocities, basically) through content consisting of strange half-robot/half-monster creatures in environments inhabited by weird plants, graffitied walls, and lots of bubble writing.

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Yoan Capote’s Landscapes Made Of Thousands Of Fishhooks Illustrate The Complexities Of Life In Cuba

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Yoan Capote - Painting

Cuba’s 3,570 mile coastline, nestled in the Caribbean Ocean has seen everything from glamorous vacation resorts to the horrors of revolution. But as Cuban artist, Yoan Capote shows us in his Isla (Island) series, the heart of Cuba is her relationship to the water.

Capote’s collection of canvases illustrate the beauty and turbulence of the sea. He says,

“the sea is an obsession for any island country .. it represents the seductiveness of dreams but at the same time danger and isolation.”

In the Isla series, Capote captures that feeling by utilizing fishhooks to create texture and density on his large canvases. At first glance, the works seem to be made of heavy oil but upon closer inspection you see that each wave in his ocean scape is an individual fishhook that has been painstakingly painted and nailed into place by Capote and his team. Layer after layer of fishhooks creates a physically dangerous work. If you aren’t careful, it could stab you. Capote says, “I wanted to use thousands of fishhooks to create a surface that would be almost tangible to the viewer upon their approach.” Accomplished.

The result of this intense work is not only the undulating motion of the sea, but it is a comment on Cuba’s situation, more generally. The fishhooks are a symbol of Cuba’s fishing trade and they illustrate its perilous borders but through this work Capote is also able to point to economic issues, emigration, and political isolation thus evoking a shared sense of uncertainty about the future of the country.

This collection can be seen at Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, until 29 January 2016.

A Rubber Coated Basketball Court That Looks Like An Eye Popping Piet Mondrian Painting

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A recent project set into motion by a group of creatives in Paris, namely Vincent Le Thuy, the brand Pigalle and a group of creative from Ill Studio combines sports, art, and design in this recent project. The Duperré playground has stood fully renovated in the 9th Arrondissement since July 1st and its presence brings a splash of color and light to the classical grey architecture of Paris.

The court is made from “noise absorbing recycled rubber’ which gives it plus points in both the realms of noise complaints and the environment. The floor and the walls of the court, which is wedged between two buildings, are made of this material, which adds to the surreal aspect of the place. The use of color blocking as well as square and rectangular shapes in the design are also artistic on a deeper level in the sense that they are visually reminiscent of the work of Piet Mondrian.

This basketball court is a true trans medium work of art in the sense that it transcends the conceptual aspects of sports and design and brings it all home by being more than a concept and by being both an aesthetic and urban improvement. The technical aspects of the court eliminate noise pollution while the bright primary colors bring a splash of sunlight the Parisian urban décor.

Photos by Sebastien Michelini & Kevin Couliau

Charlotte Cornaton Creates Delicate And Illuminated Books Out Of Porcelain

Cornaton, Ceramics   

Cornaton, Ceramics

Cornaton, Ceramics

Born in Paris and trained in London, visual artist Charlotte Cornaton combines two unlikely platforms—the ancient craft of ceramics and the modern medium of video art—to create multi-faceted, socially-charged pieces. For Insomnio, her latest series, Cornaton focuses heavily on the ceramic side of her practice, creating 21 delicately crafted and hauntingly illuminated porcelain books.

Stunningly handmade and intrinsically dreamy, Insomnio presents and explores the paradoxal nature of clay’s transformation from a heavy, solid medium to a fragile, paper-thin representation of the contents of a book. Created during the artist’s residency in Jingdezhen, China, the pieces—comprised of porcelain and illuminated by hidden LEDS—are directly influenced by ancient techniques and rooted heavily in Chinese culture:

Insomnio is a complication of porcelain sculptural books which explain the symbolism of my nightmares using Jung dream interpretation. The oneiric world is true cerebral storm and the fear of the unconscious is here materialized through the cracks and imperfections of the porcelain . . . I used the three main ancestral Chinese techniques of incised porcelain: carving celadon, cobalt painting and cloisonné glaze. Insomnio thus uses oriental know-how to express western form of thought, incarnating the exchange and symbiosis of cultures.

Adorned with designs and inscribed with text, each book presents the artist’s acquired sense of a culture’s aesthetic and, through both a literal use of light and enlightening symbolism, results in an exhibit based prominently in illumination—literally. 

Bizarre Portraits Feature Masks Made With Junk Food

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These bizarre photographs by British artist James Ostrer feature himself and others covered in thick, sticky-looking layers of candy, frosting, and other junk food. Decadent edibles look hardened and become a strange replacement for conventional masks and armor.

Candy and sweets are often associated with joy, but looking at Ostrer’s work its hard to feel that way. They aren’t delightful, but are visceral. Frosting is slathered on haphazardly with licorice used to create outlines. Sometimes, the lines are droopy and it appears that the entire piece is melting.  The result is a peculiar and unsettling group of photographs that speaks to the sickening amount of junk food we have available as well as a reinterpretation of the self portrait.

These photos are currently on display in his exhibition Wotsit All About at the Gazelli Art House in London through September 11th of this year.

Tattoo Artist Transforms Scars Of Domestic Violence And Mastectomies Into Empowering Works Of Art

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Flavia Carvalho is a Brazilian tattoo artist who provides voluntary service for women left with scars from domestic violence and mastectomies. The project’s name is A Pele da Flor (The Skin of the Flower), deriving from the Portuguese expression “A flor da pele” (deeper than skin). In support of the healing and empowerment of women, Carvalho’s scar tattoos are entirely free—all the client needs to do is to choose a design. Her goal is to help women feel better about their bodies and selves by reclaiming their scars as marks of transformation and strength.

Everything began two years ago, when Carvalho worked with a client who had been stabbed in a nightclub by a man she turned down. Over her abdominal scars, Carvalho tattooed blooming flowers and a bird—symbols of beauty, sensitivity, and growth. After seeing how deeply touched the client was with her tattoo, Carvalho decided to bring her services to more women. Since then, her project has received deservedly positive reception on social media, raising important issues related to domestic violence, the battle with cancer, and body image.

In an interview with Huffington Post, Carvalho speaks about the emotional impact of her project—turning feelings of shame into self-love—and the deeply rewarding connections she creates with her clients:

“The feedback I have gotten from women who were helped by this project has been extremely surprising. The sense of affection, sisterhood and camaraderie is deeper than I ever imagined. They contact me from all over the country, as well as from abroad. They come to the studio, share their stories of pain and resilience, and they show me their scars. Embarrassed, they cry, and hug me. Then we design the tattoo and we schedule the session. They become excited, optimistic. It is wonderful to see how their relationship with their bodies changes after they get the tattoos.” (Source)

Visit Carvalho’s Facebook and stay up to date with her inspiring project. (Via Bored Panda)

Colorful Abstractions Transformed Into Street Art

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Xuan Alyfe street art7

The pieces of Xuan Alyfe arrive from a variety of influences rarely found in street art.  His work is largely abstract, but peppered with figures and other recognizable objects.  The murals seems to subtly reference minimalist, surrealist, and even graphic design styles.  Aylfe’s art even seems to piece together various influences of other street artists into his own distinct style.  Perhaps appropriately, then, he has exhibited and painted murals worldwide.