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Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

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The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

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Zaha Hadid’s New M.C. Escher-esque Office Building In Moscow Will Play Tricks On Your Eye

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Architect Zaha Hadid‘s new office building in Moscow, known as the ‘dominion office building,’ is a big, bold, futuristic M.C. Escher. This building is one of the first structures constructed in the up and coming district of Yuzhnoportovy. The structure marks a distinct direction for the desired path of the neighborhood: a place for visionary thinking. The exterior of the building is sleek, shiny, clean and practical, yet, it’s slight asymmetry characterizes it as an entity that deserves attention. While the building itself is striking, it is the building’s interior that is truly remarkable.The lobby and staircases have been constructed in black and white, creating an art deco reminiscent feel, yet nothing about this building’s design seems taken from the past. When looking up through the structure, the geometric shapes create a design of almost painterly accord, creating a playfulness with space that borders on optical illusion. The staircases look like winding piano keys marching through open space. The presence of light is truly considered, making it the perfect environment for forward thinking and inspiration. The building is not just progressive in its aesthetic design — it has also been created in a way to encourage and make expansion for small businesses feasible within the same space. Along with focusing on helping pave the way for small business to expand, it also fosters collaboration between companies sharing the same space; there is a ground floor café next door to the terrace — creating a communal space for exchanging ideas and socializing. (Via Design Boom and Fubiz)

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Ilona Gaynor Is Designing A Bank Robbery

 

Ilona Gaynor is a designer and image maker hailing from the UK. Her latest project, Under Black Carpets, leverages bank heists as a medium of design. Through a series of intensive design and research exercises, Gaynor is using the strategies and vocabularies of robbery as a method for storytelling. Perhaps the most bizarre fact about the project is that is actually a collaborative effort with the NYC FBI Department of Justice and the LAPD archival department. Geoff Manaugh puts it well, stating that the project is an investigation into the “use and misuse of the cityscape where by architecture is considered both the obstacle and the tool to bridge or separate you from what you’re looking for” in both legal and illegal agendas. The project, ongoing, is currently comprised of an obsessive collection of materials that range from photographs of bank entrances to scale-models of get away cars. The project truly feels like the work of an insane person… and I mean that in the best way possible.

Sr. X

Sir.x graffitiSr. X is a stencil-graffiti artist based in Gijon, Spain. His humorous post-ups are fantastic and will make any graffiti artist say, “why didn’t I think of that?” Although there is a lack of information about him on the internet, the work on his Flickr page speaks for itself.

Ernest Zacharevic’s Street Art Plays With Its Neighborhood

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Perhaps more so than any other form of art, street art has the capacity to engage with the neighborhood its found in.   The work of artist Ernest Zacharevic, also known simply as ZACH, takes this to a literal extent.  ZACH’s murals are often found interacting with features of the building or objects nearby.  A bike leaning against the wall becomes a vehicle for a spray painted child or dock posts become giant pencils.  ZACH highlights the life of the city in a way by actually making it come alive.  The walls seem poised to interact with passersby, and encourage engagement.

Matt Siber’s Untitled Project

Matt Siber’s Untitled Project is rooted in an underlying interest in the nature of power. With the removal of all traces of text from the photographs, the project explores the manifestation of power between large groups of people in the form of public and semi-public language. The absence of the printed word not only draws attention to the role text plays in the modern landscape but also simultaneously emphasizes alternative forms of communication such as symbols, colors, architecture and corporate branding. In doing this, it serves to point out the growing number of ways in which public voices communicate without using traditional forms of written language.

The reintroduction of the text takes written language out of the context of its intended viewing environment. The composition of the layouts remain true to the composition of their corresponding photographs in order to draw attention to relative size, location and orientation. The isolation of the text from its original graphic design and accompanying logos, photographs and icons helps to further explore the nature of communication in the urban landscape as a combination of visual and literal signifiers.

Tomasso Sartori’s Dark, Majestic Landscape Photographs

 

Organic life is almost completely absent from Tomasso Sartori’s photographs. Instead, we’re left with sparse, apocalyptic images washed in glaring red and stifling shadow. The people-less landscapes remain defiantly intact, as if to say “we existed before you, and we’ll keep going long after you’re gone”. A nice reminder of the strength and majesty of our natural surroundings. Too often, we lapse into a flawed impression that we are the most important force in the world. Sartori’s pictures correct that mistake pretty quickly. (via)

NoLoveLost

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NoLoveLost, aka Gareth Rice, is an artist, designer, and illustrator based out of New Zealand. His work has been used and featured in print advertising, editorial design, and campaigns for K-Swiss, Oakley, and Redken. His graphics are energetic, and I like how his illustrations organically meld with the photographs they are incorporated with.  The above artwork is part of a new series intended to “give human based subjects a flawed final resolve, rather than a perfect one, which is so common in our industry.” Whether his illustrations are for a shoe company or for himself, you’ll find yourself doing a double take, just to grasp everything going on.