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Jakob Tolstrup’s Humorous and Eccentric Human and Animal Worlds

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Inspired by past experimentation with graffiti culture, Jakob Tolstrup paints eccentric and bizarre characters and worlds. Most of his work combines images from the animal and human worlds and either exposes or makes fun of various aspects of these worlds. He uses humor and straight forward but absurd imagery to subvert ideas associated with the worlds he portrays. “I’m very fascinated by why people make the choices they do in this world, why we live the way we do and all the contradictions I see in the streets all over the world. Often with an alternative reality in mind.” Tolstrup was born in Denmark but currently lives in Berlin.

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Taxidermy And Furniture Blend As Disturbing Comment On Consumer Culture

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Designer Armin Blasbichler‘s work is often jarring.  His series ORSON, I’m Home strikes a special chord, though.  The series is composed of three “dining sculptures” created primarily from the bodies of various farm animals.  While we may be more accustomed to farm animals adorning plates on the furniture, seeing them as taxidermy furniture makes for a surreal juxtaposition.  The furniture confronts its users with the consumption it usually facilitates.  Interestingly, for the series Blasbichler features a quote from professor and writer Don Slater: “In talking of modern society as a consumer culture, people are not referring simply to a particular pattern of needs and objects […] but to a culture of consumption.”

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Andy Vible Replaces Heads With Miscellaneous Objects In His FIgurative Sculpture

Recent MICA grad Andy Vible makes “life-size sculptures of human bodies whose heads have been replaced by everyday objects”.

Straightforward enough. Or maybe not. By decapitating his sculptures he makes us feel slightly uncomfortable. In a way, we’ve lost our heads too, and that’s a good place to start. Without a head (without a brain), we are left fully subject to Vible’s will. He has our attention. And that’s where the “everyday objects” come into play. Vible inserts these elements (cctv cameras, loudspeakers, reference globes, birdhouses, etc.) into his works in order to “communicate in a type of language that everyone understands”. In common language and without our personal projections, the works are able to come across clearly. Click the link and hit your bookmark button. You know what to do.

Installation: 400 Chairs Assembled into a Sine Wave for Freedom Park in Atlanta

“Sitting is perhaps the most common condition from which we experience architecture. Whether we work, relax, watch, eat, sleep, or talk to each other, sitting is at the core of our relationship to buildings.”

“SEAT” is an installation in Atlanta’s Freedom Park produced by E/B Office (Ju Lee and Brian Brush). The piece involves 400 chairs assembled in a sine wave formation “drawn into an agitated vortex rising from the ground.”

The “SEAT” pavilion was organized in part by Flux Projects, an Atlanta based public arts organization. (via)

Antic Staatsoper’s Renaissance Inspired Photo Series Examines Man’s Desire

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Antic staatsoper makes photographs which reference old religious renaissance paintings. These include themes about love, lust, faith, shame, and betrayal. The pictures created are striking and controversial. The nude and partially nude models are manipulated in such a way that they transform into more painterly forms. Staatsoper uses a technique which blurs the image to produce a hazy mind altering effect. The overall results are violently striking images which bring age old stories to light. The idea of carnal desire is present but not only in a sexual sense. There’s also the notion of an abnormal attraction to food and drugs. And a desire for power. The artist talks about our current state of spirituality which seems compromised from the old way of thinking. This is an astute conclusion as more earthly ways have come to define us and become more prevalent in “current religions”. Still, we are aware of a higher power whether imagined or real it surrounds us with the question of why am I here and for what reason? In that sense, Staatsoper captures the uncertainty we feel in extreme situations which usually define us. From an aesthetic viewpoint the work is powerfully done in its moving and raw depiction of circumstance. Using figures seemingly pulled from greek tragedy we see them in a modern light tracing our historical significance.

Chow Martin

 

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Chow Martin uses ink and charcoal on mylar to create these magnificent half-animal, half-human, entirely fictional creatures. His intense, expressive linework seems to capture the flesh and muscles lying beneath the subject’s skin…or fur. 

 

Christina Córdova Sculpts Beautiful And Enchanting Magical Ceramic Figures

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Artist Christina Córdova sculpts beautiful and enchanting ceramic figures. The artist, now living in Penland, North Carolina, grew up in Puerto Rico where she was raised heavily embedded in Catholic imagery. The classic posses and the notion of reference and body positioning as story telling has deeply made an impact on her work — the figures within her art hold poses that can be found in both theological and mythological images. Each piece has an almost magical realist feel: while her pieces can be traditional in execution, they always feature an element of surprise and surrealism. Through blending moments of texture with perfectly sculpted human forms and strange depictions of wild animals, her works somehow achieves the ability to be screaming a secret — to be demand attention yet offering no specific answers, only curiosity and inquisition. Each work has a story. Each figure has a history. Her use of a classic material, ceramic, truly allows her work to exist within a plane of antique elegance. However, through her use of pattern and color, Córdova’s work is contemporary and fun, yet undoubtedly sophisticated. She tends to use found materials such as metals and wood from her homeland, Puerto Rico. Because of these materials, her ceramic finishes mimic a sort of rawness that truly gives her sculptures their “relic” like quality. Córdova’s sculptures are absolutely stunning and genuinely radiate a aura of mysticism and truth. (via juxtapoz)

Sophia Collier’s Water-like Portraits Of The Wind

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Working in her studio in Sausalito, CA, sculptor Sophia Collier uses a combination of acrylic block and algebraic function (with a little help from a CNC router), to carve sculptures of wind. The clear, floating relief works look like freeze-frame slices of the water’s surface. She spends a great deal of time replicating the effects that both wind and light create on a large body of water using custom rendering software and sound recordings of the wind. Collier carefully mimics its movements and reactions with a series of digital “brushes” she has created, working to develop unique strings of information to carve out each piece. The sound waves move and fluctuate in the digital space just as they do in the physical realm—and the result is a crystallized portrait of the wind, giving the visual effect of sunlit water. She outlines her entire process here.