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Arturo Oliva Pedroza


Los Angeles artist Arturo Oliva Pedroza produces the kind of photography I love. That grainy, seemingly accidental snap shot that you can’t stop staring at. Pedroza’s genius lies in capturing these quiet, easily overlooked moments of beauty that smack you in the face with their simplicity and honesty. Picking up a pizza on that cold walk home from the bar can be magic–if you let it be.

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Chris Keeney’s “PetCam” Gives Artistic Freedom To Unlikely Collaborators: Animals

Fiona, Brown Swiss Cow, Val Müstair, Switzerland

Fiona, Brown Swiss Cow, Val Müstair, Switzerland

Taken by Fiona

Taken by Fiona

Coulie, Border Collie/ Golden Retriever cross, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

Coulie, Border Collie/ Golden Retriever cross, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada

Taken by Coulie

Taken by Coulie

San Diego-based photographer Chris Keeney might have orchestrated the series PetCam, but it’s not his artistic eye that captured the shots. No, instead he handed the job over to an unlikely set of collaborators: animals, including his dog Fred and cat Alice. Chickens, pigs, cows, and guinea pigs living all around the world partake in the fun with a lightweight camera that’s tailored to their size. Keeny set the shutter to click at specified intervals of time that range from a fraction of a second to many seconds.

The photographer stresses that these cameras don’t impede the movement or happiness of the subjects, and they’re given free reign to go about their day: exploring sights and sounds, relaxing under a car, and scaling rooftops. For us, the results present a view that we don’t often see – one that’s from the vantage point of an animal. Some of the photos are distorted, others confusing, but all are intriguing; they provide us a look into what catches these creatures’ eyes as the move throughout the world.

PetCam was made into a book and published by Princeton Architectural Press. (Via Feature Shoot)

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Beautifully Lit Heaps Of Trash At Night

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There’s something at once lighthearted and sad about Benoit Paillé‘s photographs in the series Jour du Déménagement (translates from French as “Moving Day”).  Discarded furniture, boxes, mattresses and other household items sit in piles waiting to be picked up by the garbage truck.  The photographs are taken in the dark, seemingly in the middle of the night, and the trash lit by a single bulb.  Little attention is paid to garbage on the curb; at night while everyone is sleeping it’s completely forgotten.  Regardless, items we’ve lived with often for years quietly sit there all night.  The scene is reminiscent of food in the refrigerator, and wondering what happens when the door closes and the light goes out.

Maartje Folkeringa’s Decaying Figures

Maartje Folkeringa creates decaying figuartive sculptures out of foam. The work reminds me of earlier work by Folkert De Jong who was our cover artist for Issue: V of Beautiful/Decay.

Nasa’s Solarium Project Gets You Up Close And Personal With The Sun

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If you ever wondered what it would be like to occupy the same room as the sun, try Nasa’s Solarium. Currently making stops throughout the U.S. the show produced by a division of the space agency known as Solar Dynamics Observatory or SDO, is actually a spacecraft that has been taking pictures of the sun for the past five years. It brings findings using photographs taken over the past year, into an intimate space  documenting the blistering star’s movement per second. The material collected is the first of its kind and splices together incredible footage into a series of HD gifs and stills giving you an idea of what it might feel like landing at the gates of hell.
Not surprisingly, most of the photographs portray a round star with several thousand fires burning at once. Constant explosions accompany the flames making you wonder how planets in the solar system don’t disintegrate immediately by her immense power. Other interesting shots capture the mother star in a dormant state depicting a series of smoldering smokestacks. In another unexpected and humorous portrayal, the sweltering star looks like a flame-grinning jack o lantern. Very cool, (or hot) indeed.
The sun is at the center of our solar system and approximately 130 times larger than earth in size and 330 times larger in Mass. It’s mostly made up of hydrogen and helium. Without the sun, all planets in the solar system including earth would die. Despite what might appear to the naked eye, the sun is actually white not yellow or orange in color. The reason for the false hue is atmospheric scattering. This is when molecules are diffused by the solar beam into the earth’s atmosphere changing the sky’s color. (via citylab)

This Plastic Skeleton Lives The Life Of “Basic” Girls On Instagram

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From the sounds of it, Skellie is your average girl. She loves Starbucks, takes full advantage of open bars, and goes on shopping sprees. Skellie chronicles her life on an Instagram account, where she’s known as @omgliterallydead. The caveat, though, is that Skellie is a skeleton – a fake one that you’d normally see around Halloween.

This project started as an inside joke between co-workers, and Dana Herlihey, a social media manager, is the brainchild behind Skellie and her antics. “In early October, a pose-able, plastic skeleton arrived at our office,” she told Buzzfeed. “My coworkers took to it; someone taped a Starbucks cup to the skeleton’s hand and I took a photo for my personal Instagram. (This was at the height of the Pumpkin Spice Latte craze.)”

Herlihey thought that it’d be funny for the skeleton to have its own Instagram account, and she realized the potential for contemporary satire. Skellie plays the part of a “basic” person who gets super excited over the most average things – Fridays, sushi, and snow are just a few. Each photo adds another definition of the term.

Herlihey has a lot of dedication to Skellie. When you see the skeleton at the coffee shop, at the dentist office, and at a bar, that means that Herlihey took her with her. “Some people love it, laugh, ask to take a photo, or make a witty pun as they pass by,” she explains to Buzzfeed.. “Others will pretend there is no skeleton sitting beside me or give me frequent disapproving side glances.” (Via Bored Panda and Buzzfeed)

Julio B Esq’s Bouduoir

Julio B Esq photography

I found Julio B Esq’s Bouduoir series during my weekly stroll through the B/D Creative Pic Pool. Julio’s photos walk a fine line and could quickly be dismissed as shocking snapshots of drunk/high people taking part in bizarre acts.However I think there is something that sets his work apart from all the shock and awe Terry Richardson wannabes that deserves a closer look. When I first saw these photos I immediately thought about the infamous Calvin Klein ads that were scrutinized for their basement kiddie porn appeal. I can see Julio’s photos taking place in the same old basement as the CK shoots complete with cheap wood paneling and 30 year old shag carpet. Creepy or not Julio’s photos have an erie calmness to them that separates them from the pack. I liked the series even more once I read his text about the inspiration for the set:

“Historically, the boudoir formed part of the private suite of rooms of a lady, for bathing and dressing, adjacent to her bedchamber, being the female equivalent of the male cabinet. In later periods, the boudoir was used as a private drawing room, and was used for other activities, such as embroidery or entertaining intimate acquaintances.”

If you’d like your work featured on Beautiful/Decay make sure to join the B/D Creative Pic Pool!