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Matt Martin

The UK’s Matt Martin is a film photographer working out of Brighton. His work gives us a refreshingly intimate look at adventure, a subject that’s typically trampled to death by passionless snapshots, Matt shows us how to do it right. He’s also an extra hardworking and motivated young man, heading up The Photocopy Club, a series of DIY photography exhibitions aimed to take photography off of the screen and back into the hands of the people using one of the most accessible mediums – the photocopy. The next show opens in London on Feb. 3rd.
Much of this series of photos was taken from Matt Martin’s new double-zine Goodnight Neverland / Thank God I’m Forgiven published by No Fun Press.

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The Drawings And Clothing Of Dinosaur Special Cassette Are Out Of This World

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The Artist Collective known as DSC or Dinosaur Special Cassette make some pretty neat stuff. Based out of the UK, it consists of two people who create drawings and garments. A colorful variation of ideas on instagram eventually show up in clothing lines for children and adults. These drawings stand alone in originality encompassing vibrant hue reminiscent of rainbows and youthful subject matter. They possess an amazing amount of original wonder and charm. They take a lot of influence from children’s textile patterns but with a tad more flavor. The narratives speak to Romare Bearden in collaged color and placement. It’s exciting to see people on social media drawing with such abandon. This is where you can see the best scribbles of DSC.

DSC’s clothing is sewn under the label Klushka. These are one of a kind pieces inspired by their fabulous drawings. One called “Critter Applique Jumper” is a blue smiling blob painted on top a pink sweatshirt made of newsprint patterned material. It combines early Sex Pistols never mind the bollocks with a funky collage effect. A collection of long tees or nighties with elaborately drawn prints of aliens and dollar signs are also offered. Those take reference from eighties artists like Jean Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.

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Erik Jones’ Vibrant Paintings Juxtapose The Figure With Graffiti-like Abstraction

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Brooklyn based artist, Erik Jones, paints vibrant portraits marrying the female nude with abstraction. His new series, In Colour, juxtaposes traditional figure painting with digital-grafitti-esque mark making. His work is simultaneously inviting and confrontational — we enter the picture plan via recognized moments of breasts, hair, and lips, yet, are then pushed away by bold 2-D elements floating through a seemingly 3-D space (or perhaps, is it the other way around?). His paintings are endless fun for the eye, constantly provoking the viewer to make sense of a nonsensical atmosphere. He states:

“The figures are used as an aesthetic anchor, holding the viewer’s attention to a recognizable form, while exploring colorful, nonrepresentational abstractions. In a way, the figures make the chaos palette-able.  I wanted the graphic aesthetic to take on digital qualities and appear to be more naive and childlike in the approach. As if an inexperienced, non-artistic person were exploring a digital drawing program for the first time.”

The “digital drawing” effect mimics contemporary approaches to fashion prints and graphic design, giving off an editorial-like feel. While his work is very playful, it also feels precisely calculated and particular. Jones is able to create a hyper specific effect using a plethora of media, including; watercolor, colored pencil, acrylic, water-soluble wax pastel and water-soluble oil, making sure that each mark he makes is rendered the exact way he intends.

Erik Jones solo show, In Colour, will be showing at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome, Italy from October 24th – December 1st. (Via Supersonic Art)

Masashi Kawamura

“日々の音色 (Hibi no neiro)” is the name of this new music video for the band SOUR, directed by Japanese designer/art director/video guy Masashi Kawamura. The amount of choreography involved in this video, which is comprised of clips of fans shot on their webcams, is so staggering I don’t know how they possibly could have done it…but I also don’t know how they could have faked it. After the jump, more work from Kawamura, who’s done a lot of other cool, clever stuff in various mediums.

Jesse McManus

Jesse McManus is pure speed. His skills are frightening. His beautiful line work captures demented children, gremlins, goblins, cats, and very often knives, or just pointy tools in general, with an incredibly demented precision. Listen to his interview on Inkstuds, read some comics, tumble alongside him, and/or tweet at him.

Drew Turner’s Conscious Animals

Uk based designer and illustrator Drew Turner’s illustrations look into our evolution through time and space. They depict the psychological differences found between ourselves and present day organisms. With a shroud of mystery over other lifeforms, they are a visual reflection of our greater ability to imagine and argue a question of thought towards an animal as a conscious being.

oh carlyn


Continuing on my Flickr curatorial mission, here is oh carlyn, an artist based in Portland, Oregon.


One of my favorite things about her work is her method of documentation, which is basically for lack of better words, poor quality mobile-photography. But there’s something really nice about the way a cellphone takes pictures. It really captures the atmosphere… the intimacy of the air and dust. 


Spellbinding Death Masks And Sugar Skulls


For Epitaph, British photographer Rankin teams up with Beaty Editor Andrew Gallimore to create spellbinding death masks inspired by the Mexican Day of the Dead and Roman Catholic All Souls Day. Like the sugar skulls, or calavera, used to celebrate the holiday, these elegant masks put a vital and lively spin on death. Decked out in intricate beading and filigree, their models look luxurious and festive.

Calavera, normally colored in vibrant greens, reds, yellows, and blues are often eaten after the holiday; adorned in glittering stars and blooming daisies, these living skulls look like sweet confections. The female faces, painted in black, become a youthful template for imaginative explorations of an afterlife that awaits us after old age. As if from another world, their gray-green eyes stand starkly against coal-toned flesh. Rankin and Gallimore infuse the editorial with a hefty dose of high-fashion edge, introducing elements like metal spikes and and chains. These harder elements blend seamlessly with the iconography of the Day of the Dead; in one mask, a red clown nose made of punk-rock studs puts a contemporary spin on the timeless tradition.

Rankin is not new to the theme of death. In the wake of his parents’ deaths, he was compelled to break cultural taboo surrounding the dead, to face head-on his fears of dying. For last year’s photo series ALIVE: In the Face of Death, published by Hunger Magazine, he photographed those effected most by death, giving voice to grieving family members and to resilient individuals living with terminal diseases. Here, his enthusiastic lens provides solace from the fear of the unknown, inviting us to celebrate those we’ve lost as we mourn them. (via Trend Land)