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Jason Hackenwerth

Jason Hackenwerth

 

Jason Hackenwerth has taken the long tradition of balloon animal making, and has come up with what my 12 year old self might have imagined the Yeerks from Animorphs might have looked like, only in gigantic, horrific, beautiful form.

 

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Chris Little

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Chris Little is a photographer and a film maker. His images are grainy and have a washed out tone, but this makes them rather enticing. His subject matter varies, everything from portraits, to ladies drenching themselves in milk, to drag racing motor sports. I dig it.

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Ballet And Geometric Patterns, And A New Sound Collide In This Awe-Inspiring Music Video

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A performance combining digital lines, monochromatic backgrounds and two individuals. The collaboration for ‘Sparks’ music video, between composer/producer Ralf Hildenbeutel and filmmaker Boris Seewald has created a dynamic choreography shrewdly synchronized with the music, a track from the composer’s new album, ‘Moods’.

The geometric motifs are shaped in lines, cubes, circles and appear sporadically while the two women dancers perform. The electro/classical sound is giving the tempo to the intertwined duo and extremely thin traced patterns. At some point, a hidden shape is moving under a black matte outstretched piece of fabric. The choreography is enhancing the voluptuous ballet moves of both dancers. They appear in order. Black, white and then together. The opposition of colors symbolized by the two dancers is unsettled by the lines, triangles and circles.

The music is leading the game. The staccato tempo in the beginning goes along the fast forwarded gestures of the first dancer. Possibly a few milli-seconds ahead of the choreography; the music is giving us the impression that our intuition is predicting the appearance of the geometric lines and the acceleration of the movements.
Taken apart, the 3 concepts (music, patterns and performance) wouldn’t have made any sense. Put together, they create a perfect synergy. (via The Creators Project)

Ralf Hildenbeutel’s new album ‘Moods’ is available for purchase. 

Bela Borsodi

It’s refreshing to see fashion photography that doesn’t look like your run of the mill fashion editorial. Bela Borsodi’s massive portfolio is full of playful and experimental photographs that walk the fine line between design, fashion, and art.

Gordon Parks’ Color Photographs Of Segregation

Gordon Parks was one of the seminal figures of twentieth century photography. A humanitarian with a deep commitment to social justice, he left behind a body of work that documents many of the most important aspects of American culture from the early 1940s up until his death in 2006, with a focus on race relations, poverty, Civil Rights, and urban life.

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50’s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era.

Read more about the photographs in a great New York Times article written by Maurice Berger and visit the website of The Gordon Parks Foundation for more of Parks incredible images from one of the most important eras in American history.

Kit Webster – Digital Sculpture

Kit Webster challenges the conventional use of space in a gallery with his installation, Enigmatica.  Using light to create an illusion of mass, Kit breaks up the room and reconfigures the environment with this digital sculpture.  I’d definitely like to see this in person.

Estelle Hanania

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French born and Paris based photographer Estelle Hanania is obviously interested in ritualistic worship and folklore culture. Find more of her work at FAT Galerie.

 

Robin Rhode

Robin Rhode
Calling Robin Rhode a ‘street artist’ is a bit misleading. It just so happens that most of his art is made in the street, but this multidisciplinary artist makes his mark in a variety of ways. Much of his work is performance based, not in the traditional sense, but rather through a process in which he acts in a 3D space and at the same time utilizes the illusion of a drawn object… and then the entire process is photographed, leaving the viewer with a consolidated mixture of mediums, spaces, forms and ideas.