Get Social:

Michael Anderson’s Equal Opportunity Destroyer

Shes_okay_raw

Michael Anderson has been busy, since the studio visit Beautiful/Decay did with him in August he’s prepared two major solo shows.  Anderson makes large-scale collages from street posters, sometimes measuring 12 feet across.  Anderson’s newest show promises to a be visually mesmerizing cultural stew of optimistic, reverse advertising, aka subvertising.  I talked with him about “She’s Okay,” the above collage, and he compared the golden lattice structure to the complexity of the girl’s thoughts and experiences.  The exhibition, Equal Opportunity Destroyer, is opening April 8th in Copenhagen Denmark at Gallery Poulsen.

Advertise here !!!

Surreal Animated Gifs Created By Reassembling Images

domonkosgif23 Animated Gifs

domonkosgif16 Animated Gifs

domonkosgif

BillDomonkos is a visual artist and filmmaker who we previously featured in May 2011. Most recently, he has begun posting gifs he’s made to his Tumblr page. If you’re familiar with any of his film work, then the animated gifs should resonate with you as they similarly reflect Domonkos’ aesthetic. In both forms, he collides and combine ideas and images using digital effects, editing, and manipulation to assemble a new experience of form. His work is largely informed by the elusive part of cinema, the ineffability of an expression that can only be sensed by evoking particular images, sounds, and feelings. The endless loops of the animated gif form brings something new to Domonkos’ aesthetic, allowing for the endless contrast of an animated image with a static image. His work reminds me of the last gif artist I posted, Tony Kinglux, who uses a similar process and method when creating his gifs, though there are obvious differences in their overall aesthetics. Domonkos lives and works in San Francisco.

Advertise here !!!

Guerrilla Girls

Interesting presentation at the MOMA about the infamous Guerilla Girls. If you’re not familiar with them here’s a blurb from their website.

“We’re a bunch of anonymous females who take the names of dead women artists as pseudonyms and appear in public wearing gorilla masks. We have produced posters, stickers, books, printed projects, and actions that expose sexism and racism in politics, the art world, film and the culture at large. We use humor to convey information, provoke discussion, and show that feminists can be funny. We wear gorilla masks to focus on the issues rather than our personalities. Dubbing ourselves the conscience of culture, we declare ourselves feminist counterparts to the mostly male tradition of anonymous do-gooders like Robin Hood, Batman, and the Lone Ranger. “

Lauren Semivan’s Black And White Photography Digs At Our Primitive Nature

Lauren Semivan - Photography Lauren Semivan - black and white photography Lauren Semivan - Photography black and white photography

Lauren Semivan’s black and white photography raises the dead, feels rich with ritual, and sullen from the earth. To say it is simply an abstract psychological expression would be too easy. There’s something else happening here that is magically archaic, and it’s not just the finely tailored compositions that carefully, yet seemingly casually, dig at our remains by arranging drawn fragments, bodies, vegetation, bones, and string, against a sparse backdrop. This “something else” is movement or play not just in the environment, but as or with the environment, a dreamy surreal fade that lingers.

Technically, each image is a true representation of not just what collects, but how the collection becomes. Shot with a purist sense of photography’s past, Semivan uses an early 20th century 8 x 10″ view camera and, without digital manipulation or any touch-ups at all, develops prints from a scanned large format negative. The ephemeral result, interestingly, pushes on our own anthropological or archeological impulses as a species– asking us to engage and connect with our ancestors, creatively, scientifically, and divinely.

Of her work, Semivan states, “In scientific disciplines, a line is classified as an event. Something as primitive as a scrawl on a surface reveals an aggregate of events, intersecting and changing course. Drawings made on the seamless backdrop describe an emotional space. Science is inherently experiential, as is art making. Knowing and feeling are not separate, and the whole of the environment can be used as a pedagogic instrument. Observatory elegantly draws upon a tension that exists between irrational and physical worlds. Within each image, ghosts of previous drawings.”

Anne Lindberg And Four Other Artists Who Transform Ordinary Thread Into Breathtaking Works Of Art

Anne Lindberg

Anne Lindberg

Sébastien Preschoux

Sébastien Preschoux

Gabriel Dawe

Gabriel Dawe

Serie

Serie

Anne Lindberg is interested in creating work that resonates with non-verbal primal human conditions.  Seeking to make work that is subtle, rhythmic, abstract and immersive Lindberg finds beauty in creating disturbances by layering materials to create varying tones, densities and pathways.

The architecture and design practice, Serie, created an amazing installation for the Maximum India Festival on the ceiling of the Monsoon Club at the Kennedy Center in DC in 2011.  Incorporating over one million threads the piece is a 3D carpet that was inspired by the traditional flat woven rugs in India (Dhurries).

Gabriel Dawe’s breath-taking, mind-bending large-scale installations are made out of nothing but thread.  The works are created using sets of string that can be up to 50 miles long.  They play with space, dimension and perception.

Brian Wills is also interested in perception and rhythm and the way the brain processes pattern.  His hand-made works are created by individually winding threads around board, or other material.  Creating dynamic surfaces his works are engaging and beautiful.

French artist Sebastien Preschoux makes thread installations in sections of the forest.  Capturing the installations for posterity via photography the results are stunning.  We imagine the works sitting quietly in the forest, as if created by a spider from another world, delicately vibrant against the natural backdrop waiting to be discovered.

Paintings Of Corrupted Disney Characters Being Naughty

Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Disney Characters  Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros - Oil Painting

Remember the urban legends that Disney movies had ‘sex’ written in the stars or that Aladdin whispers “good teenagers take off their clothes”? Artist Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros took that imagery to heart, and much further, in his series Dishollywood. The artist depicts Disney characters in rebellion, experimenting with substances, sexuality, or pairs them with pop-culture icons. Ontiveros is trying to show that these characters are ours to experiment with, and that we may appropriate them as we like, and combine them with what we like, to create new and contemporary characters.

“It is a collection of visual curiosities that pushes the audience to reimagine the world of pop as a personalized mash-up with the freedom to merge situations, rewrite the script, and provide new dialogue in alternative scenarios to tell new stories.

 

DisHollywood is also a barometer for measuring our tolerance and acceptance levels; a new way of observing the “happy ending” that trumpets the time of equality is now. In contrast to the baroque fantasy implied by the original, idealized presentation of these characters, a new context of social vulnerability shows the darker side of our contemporary society.”

Some of it does demonstrate the degenerate side of our culture. Tiana – whose name is suspiciously close to Rihanna’s to begin with – is shown as a mashup with the pop-star, with bruises on her face, presumably post-Chris Brown. In a way the images do a good job of highlighting our sometimes-questionable behavior without lecturing. The characters who are originally totally pure, are defiled, making them more real, and also making our reality seem darker in that contrast. It’s also just hilarious to see Minnie Mouse and Daisy Duck taking hits from the bong, though. (Via Huffington Post)

Gavin Worth’s Wire Sculptures Look Like Sketchbook Drawings

worthsculpture worthsculpture3 worthsculpture10

worthsculpture2

Multimedia artist Gavin Worth uses steel wire and rods to sculpt beautifully minimal forms and figures that look like they were sketched in the air. 3D representations of 2D conceptual drawings, each of Worth’s sculptures portray human forms and silhouettes, with careful attention paid to the details of these “illustrations.” His large scale portraits of faces that depict thirsty visages are perhaps his most detailed and deliberate constructions. For these, Worth sought to convey an emotional anxiety through the sculpted faces. Of his work, Worth writes,

By bending black wire into something of freestanding line drawings, I create sculptures that engage the viewer by involving them in their subtle changes. When the light in the room shifts, so does the mood of the piece. A breeze might softly move an arm. My wire sculptures tell stories of simple human moments: a woman adjusting her hair, a face gazing from behind tightly wrapped arms, a mother gently cradling her baby. The honest, unguarded moments are the ones that I find to be the most beautiful.

(via cross connect)

Amii Stewart

Amii Stewart, disco legend, and starring in possibly one of the most decadent music videos I’ve seen. I’m not sure what the pinnacle of video technology dictated in the late-late 70s but digital media artists like John Whitney were already starting to make fairly advanced films out of just graphics programming as early as the ’60s. “Knock on Wood” lyrics are after the jump if you were so inclined to watch the video and sing along…