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Kurt Lam

Hong Kong based  Kurt Lam’s site says that he is a fashion illustrator but his portfolio is full of illustrations that reference art nouveau, art deco, japanese scroll painting, and various modes of abstraction that defy traditional fashion illustration tropes and push the boundaries of the genre.

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Molly Segal’s Brutal Brush Strokes Of Vulnerable Moments

Brutal, arresting, and violent, Molly Segal’s large format watercolors of hungry, rabid pack animals serve as symbols of both watchers of and participants within pernicious social situations; these scenarios, coupled with paintings of messy, passionate, unleashed sexuality are all depicted using loose, uncontrolled brush strokes, that often leave dripping paint behind. Her watercolors are made on a waterproof paper called Yupo, so before she even beings her process, she has initiated a battle between contradicting mediums. In her statement, she describes how this impacts her work:

“The loose, wet on wet technique of watercolor on Yupo paper helps me explore the ambiguities of our own boundaries. Because Yupo paper doesn’t absorb any of the paint all of the pigment sits on top, vulnerable to the elements and impermanent. The impermanence and vulnerability of the paint itself references the fleetingness of youth and the fluctuating nature of memory.”

Molly Segal is originally from Oakland and is currently an MFA candidate at The School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Thousands Of Metal Disks Come Together To Form Valay Shende’s Moving Political Sculpture

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For over 4 years, Indian artist Valay Shende put together his politically-loaded sculpture, now on show as a part of the group exhibition Migrating Histories of Molecular Identities at the Bhau Daji Lad Museum in Mumbai. Transit is a life size truck with 22 people standing on the back of it and has intensity to it, with a very moving back story. The structure is an intricate piece, made up out of thousands of metal disks all soldered together, and printed with the faces of the farmers who committed suicide from the Vidharba region and their families on them. The wing mirrors on either side of the cab have video footage of London, Mumbai and Dubai playing, to give the impression the truck is literally in transit. Shende says:

It gives a feeling that the truck is moving, but the people are actually not going anywhere, just like in real life. (Source)

Aimed at raising awareness of the increase in farmer suicide and starting a conversation about the larger political issues in India, Shende has created a powerful visual statement. This social awareness is the backbone of his practice.

Valay’s works are in subtle ways, his attempts to question the maladies afflicting urban societies and humans today. He is a keen and sensitive observer of his surroundings and is concerned about the common’s mans trials and tribulations of day-to-day life. He feels an artists owes a responsibility to the society and firmly believes an ideal world can be re-created. He wishes the audience to reflect upon the social issues plaguing man today. (Source)

(Via This Is Colossal)

Tom Deininger’s Junk Portraits and sculptures

I’m absolutely loving these explosive junk portraits and sculptures by Tom Deininger. Comprised of found objects each piece is created with various plastic and metal debris that the artist finds. The work reminds me a little of Vik Muniz but Tom still gets a pass in my book.

Nicholas Hlobo

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Nicholas Hlobo is a South African artist based in Johannesburg whose work often revolves around the idea of duality, especially as seen in the South African Xhosa culture. The contrast between feminine and masculine sexuality is of special interest to Hlobo, as well as “comfort, shelter, protection, beauty, cleanliness, sacred space, pleasure and fantasy.” An intense collection of work that gracefully explores some of humanity’s founding instincts.

Frederic Fluery’s Playful & Grotesque Drawings

Frederic Fluery lives and works in Dunkirk, France. His work remains playfull while dealing with zombies, human insides, and destruction. Fluery renders simplified characters in awkward situations.Like Daniel Clowes, his style slightly changes as his narratives shift. Frederic doesn’t hold on to a cast of characters for too long before switching gears which makes for an invigorating variety of characters and story lines.

19th Century Technique Used To Develop Images Of The Desert On Tin Cans

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Photographer David Emitt Adams‘ series Conversations with History captures images and time.  Adams collected discarded cans from throughout the Arizona desert.  The cans, eroded and reddish-brown, are as much as forty years old.  Using  wet-plate collodion, a 19th century photographic process, Adams develops the desert scenes directly onto the cans found there.  The timelessness of the deserts emerges through the images on the can, the decades of corrosion on it, and the antiquated photographic technique.

Sarah Sitkin Invites Us Into Her World Of Flesh, Organs And Mutant Portraits

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Disturbing creatures and creations bursting out from the photographs of Sarah Sitkin. The Los Angeles based artist renders dark and intriguing images that entice and generate space for introspection. The subjects of the photographs represent the kind of ugliness that attracts. She leaves it to us to draw the limit of where hideous stops and beauty starts.

Sarah Sitkin edits digitally to a minimum. Limiting the use of photoshop, she hand makes most of her props. Costumes, artificial body parts, dramatic lighting and projections are invented by instinct to fulfill the artist’s desire to give birth to her vision. Within the gloomy set up, symbols which seem dear to the artist appear sporadically. Geometric patterns such as triangles and diamonds mimic genitalia shapes. Body parts; fingers, skin and facial features are twisted and rounded until they don’t make sense anymore.

Leaving reality to reach her fantasy world, Sarah Sitkin is inviting us to come along and share her journey. Inspired by Jodorowsky and Kubrick movies, she says she is captivated by images more than plots and dialogues. The photographs do not reflect agression or anxiety. They are the depiction of Sarah Sitkin’s unique field of vision; one where deformation and anamorphosis constitute the basis of an aesthetically beautiful inner world.