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Bryan Olson’s Sci-Fi Collages

Bryan Olson lives and works in North Carolina. He combines vintage imagery to form an ongoing science fiction themed narrative. Many sci-fi elements are prevalent; portals, UFOs, analytical graphs, and celestial bodies are common in his work.The  collages represent our never ending fascination with the unknown and the search for our place in the Universe.(via)

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Iain McKell’s Photographs Of Modern Day Gypsies

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell- Photography

Iain McKell, a renowned fashion and social documentary photographer, has compiled a series of compelling images, The New Gypsies, which depicts both the physical and emotional life of a modern traveler community living in the outskirts of a technology-driven society. McKell creates surreal images that almost treat his subjects as fictional characters, yet we find that there is an undeniable hint of warmness, liveliness and honesty that instantly creates a strong bond between viewer and subject.

The British horse-drawn travelers whom sport decorated caravans, colorful clothing, and share a desire for freedom from the trappings of contemporary life, served the artist as more than just an artistic project; he calls the 10-year study “a personal journey.”

With these photographs, McKell intends to show a way of living that is both colorful and meaningful- something that lacks in contemporary living. He states that the tribe draws from the past and combines with the future, therefore “creating a set of progressive new ideas and values that are not based on materialism […] and are not chained by the stress and complications of our modern existence.”

In 2011, the photographer published a book of the series by the name of The New Gypsies by Ian McKell, it includes essays by Val Williams and Ezmeralda Sang. (via Huffpost Arts & Culture)

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Cal Lane’s Delicate Flourishes And Motifs Cut Into Weathered Metal Objects

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New York-based artist Cal Lane combines traditional metal work with flourishes and delicate motifs. She handcuts lace and other patterns in weathered I-beams, shovels, trash cans, large storage containers, and more. The result is work that references dichotomies: industrial and domestic life; strong and delicate; practical and frivolity; ornament and function. “There is also a secondary relationship being explored here, of lace used in religious ceremonies as in weddings, christenings and funerals,” Lane writes in her artist statement.

She continues, writing about what we can understand by this surprising pairing:

The metaphor of lace further intrigued me by its associations of hiding and exposing at the same time; like a veil to cover, or lingerie to reveal. It also introduces a kind of humor through the form of unexpected relationships. Like a Wrestler in a tutu, the absurdity of having opposing extremist stances is there for reaction and not rational understanding; the rational discussion arises in the search for how one thing defines the other by its proximity. (Via L’Acte Gratuit)

A Giant Immersive Kaleidoscope Built Inside A Shipping Container

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Lately, we’ve seen shipping containers used as repurposed mobile shelters for the homeless. The sculpture featured here serves an arguably less practical purpose but is a nonetheless an inventive and impressive use of the limited space. It was created by designers Masakazu Shirane and Saya Miyazaki who created a massive kaleidoscope as part of the Kobe Biennial Art Container Contest. This competition challenged creatives to craft an environment within the confines of an international shipping container. Here, the participants installed this brilliant piece as one that people could walk into and immerse themselves in an experience.

A kaleidoscope generally consists of carefully-angled mirrors that change light, color, and shape as it’s shifted. While their installation followed this general principle, Shirane and Miyazaki wanted to build the world’s first zipper architecture.  “We wanted to create the world’s first zipper architecture. In other words, this polyhedron is completely connected by zippers. And in order to facilitate even more radical change some of the surfaces open and close like windows,” explains Shirane. The structure needed to be light, soft and mobile, and they were able to accomplish it; their ingenuity paid off, too, and they won an award at the Kobe Biennial and more recently a CS Design Award. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

The Erotic Distortions Of Gabriel Gruns’ Classicly Inspired Paintings (NSFW)

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Argentinean artist Gabriel Grun paints in a style similar to the Renaissance and Baroque masters, but his work is charged with a subdued eroticism that produces a surreal effect. Grun paints the human body, often foregrounding them in natural landscapes, combining mythological and contemporary elements. Many of his human figures are contorted or shaped into grotesque or bestial shapes and poses – these distortions and manipulations could appear disturbing, but because Grun is so technically skilled at composing these eccentricities, they are merely curious and offer a contemporary and sexually-charged spin on a classical style. (via hi fructose)

Nir Arieli’s Photographs Capture The Movements Of Male Dancers

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A self-declared lover of beauty and gentleness Nir Arieli‘s photographs of male dancers combine those passions with great technical skill.  For this series, which he titled “Tension,” Arieli described his role as being a “visual choreographer.”  The portraits  are the outcome of a verbal dialogue between the photographed dancer and Arieli and of the work he says, “I don’t pre-determine the result-insisting on well-planned perfectness-but rather establish a strong understanding, let the dancer improvise and capture his movements.  Afterwards, I experiment with layering various photos on top of each other, searching for intriguing combinations.”  Dependent on coincidence and uncontrollable movements, Arieli trusts the physical intelligence of his subjects.

Arieli began his career as a photographer for the Israeli military.  Perhaps this is where his interest in capturing the physical abilities of the male body emerged. Unusual in their depiction of the male (versus female) form as a source of grace and beauty, the images are striking for their sense of movement.  In his statement Arieli says, “I can’t dance, I can’t in my room, nor in a club, let alone any kind of stage.  Whenever I am forced to try I stumble or freeze or drink enough to disappear.  However, this time, for the first time, I found myself actively involved in dancing-even if by using someone else’s body.”  Indeed, as a viewer, we feel involved with the dancer, as impossible as the postures might be for us.  Arieli wonderfully captured the movement and allowed us to feel a part of it.  (via LensCulture)

 

Jonpaul Douglass’ Amusing And Surreal Photographs Of “Pizza In The Wild”

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Los Angeles-based photographer Jonpaul Douglass gives us a glimpse into the secret lives of pizzas in his series Pizza in the Wild. These strange and amusing images are just that – perfectly-shaped pies that are alone in this crazy world, draping themselves over street signs, satellite dishes, and even a pony.

These photographs were inspired by a graffitied image of pizza that Douglass saw in his neighborhood. He was tickled by the sight and decided to replicate it using the real deal, but wanted a very specific type of pizza. It had to be the quintessential pie, like the one the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles would devour. Douglass found the perfect pizza in the form of Little Caesar’s $5 pepperoni pizzas.

All told, Douglass has gone through 20 pizzas or so in his series. In an interview with Global Yodel, he reveals that some are better kept than others:

Much of time I will pick up two pizzas and then after I run around town photographing them I will put them in my fridge in case I get another opportunity  If you look at the series you can see that some pizzas are fresh and some look to be days old. This works because some situations call for a floppy pizza and some call for a stiff pizza. I also must admit that there has been times where a used pizza gets eaten anyhow, it’s tough to ride around with a freshly baked pizza and not be tempted. (Via Neatorama and Global Yodel)

Pier Francesco Martini’s Painted Pixels

Pier Francesco Martini‘s digital self portraits are an interesting twist to one of the oldest practices in art.