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Burritos Are The Gateway Drug To Fame

sol-poster1Everyones favorite burrito chain is having a video contest for the best homage to the Chipotle menu. Pick your favorite item (I personally love the Veggie Burrito with Corn Salsa) and make a creative short. The crazier the better! Read more about the contest at the I Love Foil  website.

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Olafur Eliasson: your chance encounter

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

slow-motion shadow in colour, 2009. HMI lamps, colour-effect filter glass (blue, green, magenta, orange, red, yellow)

Danish-icelandic Olafur Eliasson has done it again! “Your chance encounter” is showing at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Japan. His intent to make his work engaging and relevant in the tailored museum space brings the institution to life. The rooms and corridors are transformed through his use of light, mirrors, shadow, color, wind and fog. Eliasson re-proposes the idea of the art museum as not just simply a building we go into to see art removed from society, but as more of a public space with the potential to engage society and the urban environment. If you’ve had the “chance encounter” with Olafur’s new installation, let us know what you think- was he successful in doing so?

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Mark Jenkins

mark jenkinsMark Jenkins as been putting a lot of fun stuff in the streets over the years. His street installations are some of the best and truly bring a smile of curiosity to most on lookers. The one pictured above is my personal favorite, but make sure to check out the other fun installations coming from the wacky mind of Mark.

Elisabeth Lecourt’s Dresses Made Out Of Antique Maps

Elisabeth Lecourt is a multidisciplinary artist who lives and works in London. Her newest body of work is entitled Les robes geographiques in which delicate dresses are constructed out of antique maps. In her own words the series acts as “a portrait of people through their clothes, like a blue-print of their soul.” Her bio explains the importance of the female figure in her art: “Sensitivity and vulnerability are the main subjects in the work of the artist…the feminine figure is seen like the spine of her house, like an essential component of this particular world.” (via)

Seth Globepainter’s Dreamlike, Rainbow-Colored Murals

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French muralist Seth Globepainter paints large, expansive scenes of people on the cusp of going some place else. The fantastical compositions feature young men and women whose heads are often in the proverbial clouds. Their bodies are obscured and half-hidden in another mysterious dimension that’s as easy to access as lifting a curtain.

These murals read as dreamscapes where the surreal and impossible happens. Everything is beautiful, nothing appears to hurt, and the color of the rainbow surrounds us wherever we go.

With their backs and side turned away from the viewer, it’s clear that Globepainter’s characters aren’t concerned about us. They’d rather make it to their next big adventure, or at least find out what’s behind that curtain. This creates a lot of intrigue, and we are founding asking questions about where they are going or what they’re leaving behind.

See some of Globepainter’s impressive in-progress shots on via his Instagram. (Via Slow Art Day)

Cayce Zavaglia’s Incredibly Real Embroidered Portraits That Look Like Paint


American artist Cayce Zavaglia considers herself a painter.  “Although the medium employed is crewel embroidery wool, the technique borrows more from the worlds of drawing and painting”, the artist comments on her statement.

Manipulating color, especially paint with a brush, is obviously easier than manipulating color with varying wool strings and needles. That seems kind of impossible, don’t you think? Zavaglia makes it looks like a seamless process, laborious but not too difficult to actually achieve.

“Initially, working with an established range of wool colors proved frustrating.”

Painterly portraits demand for loose brushstrokes and intermingling colors, varying tones, and contrasting hues; creating a technique that would allow her to do this with wool strings was something that Zavaglia struggled with. However, with time, she came up with a system of sewing the threads in a sequence that would ultimately give the allusion of a certain color or tone. The system allowed for the threads to mimic the depth,volume, and form that we are familiar with in paintings and color drawings.

My work unabashedly nods its head to the tradition of tapestry and my own love of craft. Using wool instead of oils has allowed me to broaden the dialogue between portrait and process as well as propose a new definition for the word “painting”.


Swedish illustrator Niklas Lundberg AKA Diftype creates dense digital collages that transport you to another world where everyone and everything is constantly changing, morphing, and manipulating. His alternate digital worlds are so convincing that I wonder if even his business cards shape shift once they exchange hands.  Guess I’ll have to go to Sweden to find out.